The Early Word: Reis 100 Sandwich Factory

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A trio of tiny sandwiches. Left: White anchovy banh mi; Top: Orange-strawberry-almond jam with cream cheese: Bottom: Duck pate with pickled beets and turnips

It's all sandwiches all the time around here. Bar Reis, a neighborhood bar in Park Slope, recently opened an annex called Reis 100 Sandwich Factory, serving, yes, 100 different mini sandwiches. It's a great business idea, since the shop is open until 2am, and you can bring the snacks into the bar with you.

The diminutive, four-inch sandwiches are divided into categories like grilled cheese--cheddar/tomato, Manchego/mushroom, etc--egg salad, vegetarian, tuna, banh mi (natch), torta, Eastern European deli, and so on. You have a choice of white or wheat mini baguette, both of which are wonderful, made by Caputo Bakery.

There are some hits and some misses.

Most of the sandwiches are $3.50, which is a bit on the high side considering you need at least two or three for a proper lunch. That's over $10 if you're hungry. Plus, about a third of the sandwiches are $5--understandable since they're stuffed with things like white anchovies and prosciutto, but you might end up spending more than you thought you would. On the other hand, if you're a little drunk you probably won't notice. And these sandwiches would make amazing tipsy food, which is really the point.

Fork in the Road sampled three sandwiches from the long list. The best (and simplest) was the sweet and savory orange-strawberry-almond jam with cream cheese. The jam floated with bits of orange peel, and squished deliciously into the cream cheese.

Maybe you'd know better to order a banh mi here, but if you give into curiosity, it's not so bad. The tiny baguette is spread with mayo, and then stuffed with nice pickled carrots, cucumbers, and perky cilantro. But stick to the kielbasa, hot dog, or chicken and bacon versions. The white anchovy was too tart to go with the carrot--all pickle and nothing else.

And stay away from anything remotely to do with the duck pate--a meatstuff that you would be hard-pressed to identify as pate. It seemed to be made of ground-up deli meats, weirdly dry, crumbly and flaky (look at the picture above and you'll see). It tasted sort of okay, but there's no need to waste your valuable meal times on bad pate when there are so many delicious duck products in the world. The pickled beet and turnips that came with it were just fine.

375-B Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn
718-207-7874


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