Austin Barbecue God Aaron Franklin Brings His Brisket to Hill Country

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Franklin's brisket was a smoldering heap of pure pleasure.


Pitmaster Aaron Franklin of Franklin Barbecue in Austin, Texas -- currently one of the most celebrated BBQs in the Lone Star State -- brought his beef brisket to Hill Country Barbecue Market yesterday evening, and the line of supplicants snaked through the restaurant to the front door.

The brisket was served from 6 p.m. till it ran out, sometime before 9 p.m. Franklin smoked the briskets, as he does in Austin, for a whopping 15 hours -- a more usual amount of time for Texas brisket would be eight or 10 hours -- and the blackened beef cuts turned out meltingly tender and smoky as hell, with a texture somewhere between brisket and pot roast. The flavor was unforgettable, and my companions and I wrapped up slices glistening with fat in white bread with raw onions, pickle chips, and jalapeños, which is the usual method of eating it, and washed mouthfuls down with Shiner Bock beer.


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Soon after 6 p.m., the line extended to the front door and beyond.

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8 comments
Steve
Steve

Smoke, smoke, smoke. No substitute for it. My smoker is made from a discarded hot water heater and has the briskets falling apart after 12 - 14 hours at 185 degrees. 

Mesquite, pecan and oak are my woods of choice. I lay a stack of wood in a tub of water for about 30 minutes prior to stacking them in the fire box. It makes a ridiculous amount of smoke during the cooking process.

Afterwards when we slice the brisket, the smoke ring is a half inch think. Pure smoky goodness...mmm, mmm, mmm...The Impulsive Texanwww.theimpulsivetexan.blo...

Bob
Bob

15 hours is about the usual amount of time to smoke a brisket unless you're a yankee.

Rsietsema
Rsietsema

Not true, Bob! I've heard of 12 hours at the most, but the times I cited are accurate. One of the reasons Franklin's brisket is so good, is that he smokes it longer, presumably at an even lower temp than usual. (And I'm going by the practice of pitmasters at places like Mueller's in Taylor, City Market in Luling, Southside Market in Elgin, Smitty's in Lockhart, etc., etc.)

Nycbbq
Nycbbq

You're right Robert. Most Tx pitmasters start  brisket really hot ~350 F and bring it home low and slow in about  5-6 hrs. A good trick when you're in the weeds but not as tender, juicy or smokey. The old school pits do not run overnight. 180 cooking temp is my latest magic number.Robbie R

Nycbbq
Nycbbq

Looks great !! Thanks for the coverage. Sorry I missed it.Robbie R

Info
Info

Robbie, you missed your life too. Keep hiding

Rsietsema
Rsietsema

Wish you'd been there to offer your analysis, Robbie. He's doing the same thing tonight at the Eater Awards, if you are available.

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