5 Best Dishes at Shanghai Asian Cuisine

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Shanghai-style lo mein at Chinatown's Shanghai Asian Cuisine


This week Counter Culture sails into Shanghai Asian Cuisine, a comparative newcomer to Elizabeth Street in the most ancient part of Chinatown, next to the alley called Chinatown Mall. Here are the five dishes that my friends and I enjoyed the most.

5. Shanghai Style Lo Mein -- The residents of Shanghai like their wheat noodles plump and their soy sauce thick, as evidenced by this heap of delicious pasta, here shown with the "pork" option (you can also get the same noodles with chicken, beef, shrimp, mixed seafood, and mixed meat and seafood).


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4. Choice of Three Cold Dishes -- The buffet of cold dishes indigenous to Shanghai cuisine is said to show a Russian influence. Starting at the top and running clockwise are: mock duck made from bean curd skin and mushroooms, "Szechuan" cabbage, and shredded jellyfish, which tastes like sweet vinegary noodles.


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3. Noodles With Meat Sauce (Cha Chiang Mein) -- This northern Chinese standard (also eaten in Korea) is lavishly topped with ground meat in a fermented bean sauce, so rich you'll probably never make it to the bottom of the bowl.


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2. Sweet Red Bean Pancakes -- Flaky pastry enfolds the slightly sweet red-bean paste, which oozes at the edges. These pancakes seem more Malaysian than Shanghaianese, but make the perfect end of a meal at Shanghai Asian Cuisine.


Next: Number one, and some pictures of the restaurant



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12 comments
Mike
Mike

The XLB are indeed very good here, but the ones at Nan Xiang in Flushing are decidely better.

Mak
Mak

I quite like this place, but although the XLB are very nice, thin, and delicate, they strike me more as a cantonese conception of soup dumplings -- and in fact all of their food seems similarly skewed -- and they remind me of the sort of XLB more typically found in Hong Kong than in Shanghai.  Not a bad thing at all, and I do like this place, but if one prefers richer and less subtle XLB, these won't likely wouldn't be your first preference in my opinion.

ace
ace

Elizabeth Street is not "the most ancient part of Chinatown." That honor goes to the bottom of Mott Street from Chatham Square up to Pell Street. That's the block where Chinese immigrants first began to cluster in the late 1870s and where New Yorkers first tasted Chinese food in the mid 1880s. Over the next decades, they gradually expanded east on Pell and up Mott to Canal. Elizabeth Street came much later.

Mike
Mike

You missed the shrimp & watercress dumplings? They're amazing.

Rsietsema
Rsietsema

Thanks for that clarification, ace.

Mollysgaga
Mollysgaga

Are the shrimp and watercress dumplings as good as at the late lamented step-down Sweet & Tart?  If so I'm on my way.

Rsietsema
Rsietsema

I agree -- should have been six best dishes. Also loved the snow pea leaf dumplings.

   
   

1. That's not a clarification, it's a correction (of an error).

2. You haven't corrected your post. WTF are you waiting for?

gargupie
gargupie

How would you stack this against 456 on Mott Street? I"ve to say, SAC's red bean pancake looks much more appetiting than the one I tried at 456 (though cheaper at the latter location).

Rsietsema
Rsietsema

Haven't tried the pancake at 456, but the crab soup dumplings are definitely better at SAC. At SAC, though, the entire upper half of the Shanghai menu is missing (pork shoulder, meatballs, etc.)

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