Take Me Out to (Dinner at) the Ballgame: What To Eat at Citifield

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Canned Kozy Shack pudding dispensed from a booth and twee little bottles of wine with the plastic cup built into the top of the bottle? This is baseball fare?


I went to the Mets' third game of the season, versus the Atlanta Braves, yesterday afternoon. The baseball was entertaining (Mets won 7-5, after almost blowing a seven-run lead late in the game), but what blew me away was the food.


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It's something of a miracle you can still get these ancient standards of baseball cuisine -- Cracker Jack and salted peanuts in the shell.


Those 25 and older will remember the old days of baseball eats, when your choices were mainly limited to Cracker Jack, peanuts, ice cream bars, hot dogs without sauerkraut, and Bud. But as the Age of Foodism dawned, an expanded list of stadium eats were demanded by a public gradually getting more discerning (some might say peevish) in its tastes.

But Citi Field takes baseball eats to a more august level than ever before. Sure, 95 percent of sales are still confined to conventional snacks along a hot dog/french fries/rubber hamburger axis at dozens of kiosks and windows on several levels, but look on the field level specifically to find some amazing viands that would have been inconceivable in a baseball stadium 10 years ago.

In one food concession configured like a store, find premade packages of sushi. Across from it are counters selling gyros and feta-dusted cheese fries, and Italian specialties catered by Leo's Latticini in nearby Corona.


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Aimed more at foodies than Greeks: a lamb gyro and feta fries


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Stadium sushi?


Location Info

Map

Citi Field

123-01 Roosevelt Ave., New York, NY

Category: General


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5 comments
Nrohrs62
Nrohrs62

OOPS, there I go now, I called you "Richard!"So sorry, Robert!

Nrohrs62
Nrohrs62

Richard,I love your columns, your fearless love of offbeat fare, etc. But really, seriously, I read your "Fork in the Road" column in the paper issue of April 11-April 17, and was startled by one of your comments. While I agree with your statement that blackening spice often tastes "burned" and am also not so fond of it, you stated that the technique was "invented fairly recently by Paul Prudhomme."  You are an intelligent, well-informed writer, but Prudhomme started making his blackening spice mixes at the very latest in the early '80's! Check your facts, pal.Nadsquad, Brooklyn, NY

Reggie
Reggie

That bologna sandwich is superb. Picked one up myself at the game on Saturday.

kim
kim

What a fun way to spend Easter~

Can I purchase these meals without a baseball admission ticket?

JK
JK

Yes, but you'll have to risk arrest by sneaking in.

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