13 Reasons Why Banning 'Pig Gulp' Sodas in NYC Isn't Such a Bad Idea

Categories: My Rant, Sietsema

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I'm not a fan of Mayor Bloomberg. In fact, I'm often heard railing against the mayor's real estate policies, which have seen ugly condo towers soaring around the city at random, granted huge subsidies and tax abatements, disfiguring historic neighborhoods. The same policies have driven homegrown ma-and-pa eateries out of business in favor of awful national franchises, cavalierly obliterating what is best about New York City and sending the profits out of state. But there is something attractive about Bloomberg's ban on bathtub-size sodas. Here are 13 reasons to admire the ban on huge soft drinks.


1. Huge sodas are spectacularly unhealthy, a causal factor in obesity, dental decay, and vitamin deficiency, more so for children than adults.

2. The High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) used in these sodas is bad for you. It is suspected to be a contributing factor in fatty liver disease, childhood-onset diabetes, and adult heart disease.

3. The average adult consumes from 70 to 140 pounds of HFCS per year, representing crazy levels of a synthetic chemical that does not occur in nature. It is an ingredient in nearly every form of processed food, but sodas contain the greatest concentrations.

4. While sodas sometimes pose as food, and take up space in your stomach, they are totally devoid of nutritional value and often act as a replacement for meals or parts of meals. They are disgustingly targeted at children. Don't confuse this issue with "freedom of choice." It is a food safety issue, like salmonella in your ground meat.

5. The corn monoculture, subsidized by the government, encourages the production of HFCS as a primary agricultural product. This has totally imbalanced agriculture in America. You pay for the HFCS twice - in taxes lost to the government, and with your health when you drink huge quantities of soda.

6. Soda sweetened with HFCS tastes awful compared with soda sweetened with sucrose.

7. Soda is served in plastic bottles or cups - petroleum-based products that often end up in landfills, releasing pernicious chemicals into the environment long after the soda has been consumed.

8. Water is good for you. Soda is not.

9. Watching Americans drink huge barrels of soda makes us look like idiots.

10. In an era of hyper-inflated health care, when many are deprived of necessary medical attention, the practice of drinking huge quantities of soda places further stress on the healthcare delivery system.

11. This "pig gulp" restriction doesn't deprive anyone of drinking huge quantities of soda if they so desire. They just have to buy several human-size servings. It's like putting a tax on cigarettes - drinking large volumes of soda will simply cost you more money, resulting in more taxes recouped by the city. The bodega owner or 7-Eleven operator will enjoy a larger profit.

12. Children will learn moderation by watching their parents drink smaller sodas. It's a good lesson to learn.

13. By "drinking" rather than "gulping" you'll enjoy the soda more. We teach moderation in drinking booze, why not moderation in drinking sodas?


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11 comments
StrangerInTheNight
StrangerInTheNight

It's a good thing that they think about our health. But that is not going to solve the problem, it will just make pay more money unless you are legally prohibited to drink more than 16oz per visit :) On this bright note, burgers, french fries, chicken wings and other food must be prohibited too or at least some kind of portion control :) So a waiter in a restaurant would say, "you've just had mozzarella sticks for appetizer, sir, therefore you are not allowed to get a burger... only a salad" :) If someone is going to eat KFC in the morning, McDonald at lunch, dunkin donuts for coffee break, and taco bell in the evening, then it doesnt matter if you drink 20oz or 5oz of soda... :)

JJ Bugs
JJ Bugs

We should be banning face eating instead.

Brigman
Brigman

For fuck sakes, America. Are we really so fat that we have to waste legislative time deciding how to control our diet? Embarrassing. The people who drink these 40 oz drinks probably have bloated credit cards and 9 kids each. Please stop making the rest of us sponsor your ignorance and show some control.  

Unree
Unree

All great reasons ... but does Bloomberg really have the authority to impose this diktat?  A ban on selling something is a classic legislative choice, not an executive one.  Dude is 100% sure he gets to decide stuff and the City Council doesn't--we see it from how he thinks his council colleagues are stuck with term limits but he'll go away when he damn well pleases--and sadly the City Council people agree with him.

charles hoffman
charles hoffman

big sodas are badbig sodas are really badbut big sodas aren't the problemand banning big sodas isn't the solution

Guest
Guest

7-Eleven is considered a grocery store, that category of busines is regulated by the state and cannot be restricted by the city, all Bloomberg's ban will do is shift business to this national chain.

Neo-Realist
Neo-Realist

I wouldn't want ban them.  People should be able to do their own thing in consuming food without mommy state restrictions; Anyhow, they'll get around the ban by purchasing two sodas at once if need be.

But what you can do is place a VAT of some sort on these huge drinks and apply the proceeds to the Medicare fund to pay for the care of people who have fallen into a disease state due to their bad dietary habits.

Rsietsema
Rsietsema

Sorry, I don't think the "right" to drink 40 ounce sodas is a right worth retaining -- in common with the "right" to drive your car without seatbelts.

Vibeofthecity
Vibeofthecity

Well Hizhoner Bloomberg's daughter Georgina does BLOW and it's banned what does it say about rich people

burning_plastic
burning_plastic

 It is worth resisting the "nanny state." I don't think this is so much about what's healthy. Are they planning on banning food with pesticide residue or antibiotics or growth hormones or anything else that would actually force the corporations that sell us these things to change their ways? No. It's aimed at the public, chastising people because they want a giant bucket of  "the real thing" and criminalizing soda pop.

I don't drink it. I have seen people buy those sizes and rarely finish it. It's a terrible thing to do to your health but it's not as bad as a lot of other things, and I think if you start criminalizing this you would eventually criminalize banana splits.

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