San Franciscans Will Pay Plenty for a 'NY Bagel'

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Reach deep into your pocket for a taste of NY in SF.


The City by the Bay is as pop-up crazy as New York. San Francisco FiTR correspondent Tracy Van Dyk reports that a current Mission pop-up near the corner of Guerrero and 18th serves one thing, and one thing only: New York-style bagels. But there's a catch: The bagels are $3 apiece.


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Schmendricks bagels are tough and a little on the runty side.


The pop-up is called Schmendricks, and it happens only Wednesdays and Fridays at Fayes Video starting at 7:30 a.m., and concluding when the bagels give out. Schmendricks is the brainchild of investment banker Dan Scholnick, a partner at Trinity Ventures, who apparently was dissatisfied with all the competing Bay Area bagels, many of which claim to be New York bagels.

According to the preachy and earnest statement on the Schmendricks website, toasting these bagels is prohibited: "If you're not sure how to properly treat this thing, we'll have to ask you to give it back to us. This is an authentic Brooklyn bagel. That means it was hand-rolled and boiled before it was baked." Not sure what "Brooklyn bagel" means vis-à-vis New York bagels in general, but the statement goes on to say that plain, sesame, poppy, onion, garlic, and salt are the only authentic bagel flavors, and "even an everything bagel pushes the limits of authenticity."

Balderdash! I asked Van Dyk (a New York City native) what she thought of Schmendricks pretentious and expensive bagels. Her reply was terse: "Outside is way too tough. Bagel is tiny. It's also a bit yeasty tasting. Very hard to chew through," suggesting Schmendricks is boiling its bagels much too long (45 seconds to two minutes is plenty).


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Don't you dare toast this "Brooklyn bagel," even if you want to melt butter on it!



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8 comments
NateMunger
NateMunger

A so-called food critic who relies on hearsay rather than eating the food? Annals of Absurdity indeed.

dunstable
dunstable

I've never had a Schmendricks bagel, but I have had many bagels here in SF, and the typical "bagel" here is far, far off the mark of what a NYer or NJite would consider a bagel.  It is little more than round bread, and it would not be unfair to say that it is like comparing a baguette to Wonder bread.  There is no comparison.  If Schmendricks at least comes close, I would pay $3 for that, although I would not wait in a long line, as happens with Schmendricks.  

sgershik
sgershik

What you call tough and runty, I call authentic.  People have a hard time remembering when a portion of food was something reasonable, instead of the super-sized expectations of today's obese population.   

The proper way to wrap a bagel before boiling is around your hand. That makes for a smaller, 4 ounce bagel, the way things used to be.

I brought some Brooklyn bagels home (the reason they are Brooklyn, instead of "New York" is that the bagels were modeled after Park Slope bagels, something you would have discovered if you took 30 seconds to Google it) and tried them alongside my Friday taste of Schmendricks.

I prefer Schmendricks, which remind me of how bagels used to taste when I was a kid (in Brooklyn).  And $3 for a taste of childhood is damned cheap.

sffork
sffork

It's nice to feel superior isn't it? This is a pretty venomous review from an author who didn't even try the bagels in question.The correspondent, Tracy Van Dyk, appears to have eaten a single bagel, which might have been bad, but doesn't justify the tone of this article from a single visit. FWIW, Schmendricks makes a better bagel than anything I've had in Manhattan this decade (even Kossar's bialys are terrible now), mostly of the oversized variety. Brooklyn still has good bagels, but they're a rarity. And a history lesson, everything bagels appeared in NY during my childhood, in the late 70s or early 80s, so any claim of their "authenticity" is only a few years from pizza, blueberry, or other gourmet ones.

Siestema loves to use Tracy Van Dyk to show how quaint and inferior SF is to NY. Like in a 2010 piece about a lousy porchetta sandwich, in which Siestema claims SF is riding on NY's porchetta craze. Any proper research would have shown that SF has had popular porchetta for years before 2010. In fact, SF"s most popular porchetta place,Roli Roti, pre-dates 3 of the 4 popular NY-based restaurants cited in the VV piece.

sadov88
sadov88

You can't beat a New York bagel! I hear its 'the water.'

openmindsrgreat
openmindsrgreat

@VoiceStreet recently they got a visit from @muntherulrik for free!! San Fran is getting spoiled. But, think I'll go open a bagel stand! : )

jeremy.mcnamara
jeremy.mcnamara

I would possibly pay $3 for a proper montreal bagel out there.

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