Is Bunny the New Bird in NYC?

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Gee, it doesn't quite look like fried chicken, does it? Fatty 'Cue's fried rabbit with spicy vinegar dip


Is rabbit the new chicken? Well, probably not! But Fork in the Road has been encountering rabbit all over New York menus in the last few months, and it seems to be more than a fluke. It all started this past March (So March Hare!), when we encountered a novel rabbit cacciatore at Zero Otto Nove, depositing a good-size and tender haunch in a rich tomatoey hunter's sauce shot with capers and onions, and thought, "Gee, this is great." Somehow, the hare, with its firm pale flesh, stood up much better to a sauce that would have overwhelmed and nearly dissolved a piece of chicken.


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Rabbit cacciatore at Zero Otto Nove


In short order, rabbits were flying out of area kitchens like Peter Rabbit's siblings hopping out of the hutch into Farmer McGregor's fields to steal carrots. Fatty 'Cue (the one on Carmine Street) established deep-fried bunny as its signature dish, looking very much like a misshapen version of fried chicken and served with a tart Southeast Asian dipping vinegar. Meanwhile, cooler heads at Daniel Boulud's Boulud Sud were offering a rabbit porchetta configured as a room-temp roulade.

Debuting this summer near the Barclays Center, Woodland featured Bugs basted in Riesling on a bed of spatzle that was almost bread pudding, while the recently opened Le Midi deposits a dark rabbit ragu, Italian style, on thick fettuccine.

The Organ Meat Society has also been downing lots of bunny lately, including deep-fried rabbit livers with tartar sauce at Hospoda, and rabbit hearts with garlic and olive oil at Porsena.


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Fried rabbit livers with tartar sauce at the Upper East Side's Czech restaurant Hospoda

Next: More bunny!

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9 comments
wanchai
wanchai

Rabbit and hare are different animals, they don't taste the same at all...


wanchai
wanchai

Rabbit and hare are different animals, they don't taste the same at all...


suparabbit
suparabbit

@robertsietsema "what's up doc?"

hopperhome
hopperhome

Since when do we eat animals considered pets in the US? There are 2 to 4 million rabbits kept as pets in the US. House rabbits are common pets in urban areas in homes just like a cat or dog. They are the third most popular mammalian pet in the US, UK and Canada. Domesticated rabbits can be litter box trained, learn their names, learn tricks, are affectionate, & bond for life with people. Of course, you can eat them. People will eat anything. Less than 85% of meat rabbit operations are inspected in this country. Rabbits can have  diseases/parasites like cats or dogs. In some countries dogs & cats are regularly consumed. But as pet ownership of these animals is on the rise so is the opposition to eating them. Rabbits are established as pets in the US so why do we objectify them as food & not dogs or cats. If tradition is the excuse, then we should applaud some cultures for poaching puppies & boiling cats. But we don't. The same breeds who are cooked make the best pets like Dutch, New Zealands, Satins, Californians, etc. There is no difference between a "meat" rabbit and a pet rabbit. Rabbits from meat operations are now living as pets. Recently, a gorilla from a zoo in Erie PA, Samantha, was awarded a certificate as a compassionate pet owner of a rabbit. (The Dutch rabbit lives with the Gorilla as a companion.) Even a gorilla knows that rabbits are best suited as friends not food. What does that make us?

swayneharris
swayneharris

@VoiceStreet Rabbit tastes like poultry to me...am I the only one who feels that way?What type of meat is rabbit considered?Is it red meat?

yumandmore
yumandmore

@ForkintheRoadVV don't understand why? occaisionally as a special but everywhere? why the trend? just to be trendy? #rabbit

VoiceStreet
VoiceStreet

@swayneharris That is a VERY good question - @robertsietsema @tejalrao, do you know if rabbit is considered white or red meat?

swayneharris
swayneharris

@VoiceStreet @robertsietsema @tejalrao Then another site considers it white meat like poultry.Does anyone have a definitive answer?

swayneharris
swayneharris

@VoiceStreet @robertsietsema @tejalrao I looked it up,it is considered red meat,the leanness of rabbit simply makes it seem like white meat.

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