Our Ten Best Tribeca Restaurants

Categories: Our 10 Best

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Village Voice
Takahachi Nobu next door? Well, sort of. This smallish sushi joint is just around the corner from the fancier fish mecca and is said to source its stock from the same provider. Fans of its East Village sister restaurant will already be familiar with the slightly silly twist of assigning movie names to maki (is the tuna, salmon, and yellowtail Taxi Driver roll a nod to the neighborhood figure?), but the prices are reasonable and the atmosphere much more zen than that of its paparazzi-flanked competitor. 145 Duane St. New York, NY 10013 212-571-1830





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Aamanns-Copenhagen Despite a number of setbacks (and one false start a year and a half ago), this Danish import finally opened on a quiet corner of Laight Street in November. But you'll know the wait was worth it after spooning bits of pickled herring and sweet tomato compote atop the kitchen's ever-present triangles of rye bread (daters beware: the dish is a punchy, breath-killing delight). Aamanns specializes in Danish small plates called smørrebrød (that Robert Sietsema deemed "stunning"), and falls inline with the New Nordic cuisine that seems to be popping up all over the city. The room is cavernous but comforting -- like a starkly staged Ikea living room -- and teaming with stylish food lovers whose geometric haircuts seem to mimic the shapes on their plates. 13 Laight St. New York, NY 10013 212-925-1313





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Michael Weber/Courtesy Parts and Labor Design
Atera Matthew Lightner is the chef at Atera, but after dining in his restaurant, you may ask yourself if he's also a crafty park ranger or a whimsical magician. Is that a lump of coal on my plate? you'll wonder as a server sets a burnished mound before you. But a single cut through the blob's gritty shell will reveal a brilliant red core so vivid and slick that it seems to illuminate the surrounding area (the dish is a slow-roasted beet that's dried over charcoal and served with trout roe). Your meal -- 25 or so courses that will set you back $150 before alcohol -- is a three-hour exercise in studied elegance, an experience that can feel exciting, confusing, and slightly exhausting. Tejal Rao describes the food as a display of "nature plus science, not a war between the two." It's best to embark on the dining adventure with an open mind and an empty stomach, as both will be brimming with wonder by the end of the evening.
77 Worth St. New York, NY 10013 212-226-1444

@malstuch.

Location Info

Locanda Verde

377 Greenwich St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Bubby's

120 Hudson St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Kutsher's Tribeca

186 Franklin St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

The Odeon

145 W. Broadway, New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Walker's Restaurant

16 N. Moore St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Landmarc

179 W. Broadway, New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Marc Forgione

134 Reade St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Takahachi Tribeca

145 Duane St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Aamanns-Copenhagen

13 Laight St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

Atera

77 Worth St., New York, NY

Category: Restaurant

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4 comments
c4sey31
c4sey31

No Bouley? No Brushstroke? David Bouley was pioneering the TriBeCa scene long before any of the aforementioned chefs AND DE NIRO! What gives?

gurizzy
gurizzy

you snubbed Sushi Azabu for Takahachi?  Nope.  Can't accept that. 

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