Bloomer Creek Wines Make Finger Lakes Hallowed Ground

Categories: Unscrewed

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Dede Hatch
Kim Engle's wines are worth the investment.
Kim Engle pauses mid-sentence as his eyes drift to the window. Looking uneasy, he peers through the foggy pane at his vineyards: "Sorry, the rain made me lose concentration; it makes me nervous." For four summer days, the rain had been driving down in unseasonably high quantities; that morning, the sound of water pounding the roof was like marbles unleashed from the sky. For a vineyard owner, the weather was frightening — particularly when trying to farm organically.

I was visiting the Finger Lakes to understand firsthand this fast-growing region of New York. Much had been written about Finger Lakes Rieslings. Occasionally, critics bestowed upon the region honorific titles like "world-class" or references to "Riesling on par with the Mosel," yet the wines weren't commonplace in shops or on wine lists.

Asking colleagues in the wine industry for producers I should visit, the name Kim Engle, followed by the phrase "I love Bloomer Creek wines," popped up repeatedly. Bloomer Creek wasn't well-known, wasn't publicly lauded like Weimer or Dr. Konstantin Frank, household Finger Lakes winery names. "Find Kim Engle. His Pinot Noir Freaked. Me. Out." another wine writer gushed. I felt privy to a secret — like a hot stock tip written on a folded napkin.

Christy Frank, owner of Frankly Wines in Tribeca, stocks a few Finger Lakes producers, including Bloomer Creek. "I love their wines. I like that they are working relatively naturally in difficult conditions, with small quantities, and are taking risks to make wines that taste of terroir."

I found Engle at his winery on the east side of Seneca Lake. Standing inside the rustic re-creation of a French country carriage house he and his wife, Deborah Bermingham, finished building in 2007, we chatted through the outlandish storm. Engle seems humbled by it all — an artisan and farmer in awe of the earth.

Engle got his start in wine through farming; he started working local jobs during a leave of absence from Cornell at age 19. He milked cows, worked on an organic grain farm, and grew his own vegetables. "I got a job for what is now Hosmer Winery over on Cayuga," he says. "At that point, it was just a vineyard, and I fell in love with it."

Engle met his now wife, then a fellow Cornell student, through a friend. Although an accomplished artist, Bermingham decided to make wine together with Engle from the beginning. Different vineyard practices have come and gone since getting their winery license in 1999. "For 10 years, I was NOFA-NY certified organic, but I stopped certification for a variety of reasons," he says. "With grapes, at the time, there was virtually no market."

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