A Taste of Decoy, the Party End of RedFarm's Mullet

Categories: Field Notes

decoyduck-robb.jpg
Adam Robb

For the past two years, restaurateur Ed Schoenfeld and chef/partner Joe Ng have hosted pop-ups and served an abbreviated menu out of the former Laundromat below their West Village nouveau-Chinese restaurant RedFarm. Last month, they opened Decoy (529 1/2 Hudson Street, 212-691-9700), the fully realized version of the cocktail bar and restaurant that was always intended for the space. We stopped by on a recent evening to sample the subterranean spot's Peking duck prix fixe and progressive cocktails.

Schoenfeld works the room and can't help but make his presence known. "Do you use a vaporizer? My son runs a $100 million dollar vaporizer business," he bellows to a friend.

Music switches between indie and hip-hop. All of it is loud, but every selection has rhythmic propulsion without descending into monotony. "I need music!" bartender Igor Zukowiec shouts. He explains, "When I first started here, they were playing the music low, but I said I have to have loud music!"

Natural wood is juxtaposed with exposed brick, and duck ornaments and potted plants hang from a central iron bar that cuts down the center of the space. The fact that the bar runs the length of the restaurant's communal table -- the dining room's main option save for a two-top and a few stools shoved into the vestibules on either side of the entryway -- should be your clue that the focus here is on drinking and the salty, fatty foods that support the practice.

You can have a proper three course meal if you so choose, although you'll have to forgo Donald and Daffy for main courses like $45 lobster noodles, black sea bass with leeks and black beans, and jerk baby chicken, which, thankfully, doesn't have any misplaced commas but still regrettably sounds like a command. For most diners though, all signs point to the $130 Peking duck feast for two, which nets six shareable courses with portions that are fair given the $65-per-person breakdown. Snacks and small plates precede the bird. A trio of pickles (cucumbers, mangoes with mustard, and kimchi cauliflower with pineapple) is a great way to prep your tongue for puffy, gnarled fish skin chips fried shatter crisp and served with fragrant black garlic aioli. They're easy to love, and $8 a la carte at the bar.


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4 comments
noreenbherr
noreenbherr

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Joey_Tai
Joey_Tai

Yeah Ed Schoenfeld and Joe Ng really created a authentic restaurant for White people while pay slave wages to the Chinese kitchen staff. They are known to exploit and bully the Chinese workers. One thing readers should know about Chinese people,they Ass Kiss White people and are really nice to them but treat fellow Chinese like SHIT. No BullShit. These Chinese Dragon ladies are some of the worst. You know they have socially arrived when they date or marry a White person. They've succeded in life and got their White prize.

Joey_Tai
Joey_Tai

Yeah Ed Schoenfeld and Joe Ng really created a authentic restaurant for White people while pay slave wages to the Chinese kitchen staff. They are known to exploit and bully the Chinese workers. One thing readers should know about Chinese people,they Ass Kiss White people and are really nice to them but treat fellow Chinese like SHIT. No BullShit. These Chinese Dragon ladies are some of the worst. You know they have arrived when they date or marry a White person. They've succeded in life and got their White prize.

activist
activist

@Joey_Tai I heard from some of my Asian activist friends that Grand Sichuan on 9th Ave and West 24th Street are quilty of treating their workers badly as well. 

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