Where to Find the Fried Chicken Chef David Standridge Fell For on a Recent Day Off

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Lauren J. Kaplan
Fried Chicken at Root & Bone
At Café Clover in the West Village (10 Downing Street, 212-675-4350), chef David Standridge makes decadent food that's somehow easy on the waistline: a sweet potato, shiitake, and pumpkin seed salad; an entrée of cauliflower "steak" with romesco; and an almond-milk panna cotta dessert. But when he found himself with a few hours to spare recently, he strayed from the healthy and went for full-on fried comfort: the bucket of bird and trimmings at Root & Bone (200 East 3rd Street, 646-682-7076) by chefs Jeff McInnis and Janine Booth.

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How Ilan Hall Built the Gorbals and Avoided the Trappings of the Celebrity Chef

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Courtesy Ilan Hall/The Gorbals
In the high-stakes era of the celebrity chef, high-profile restaurant employees often live or die by their public image, and a cook's persona is often crafted and finessed by a public relations firm long before he or she steps into the spotlight. By the time most of these people make their way in front of a television camera, they've carefully honed a trained personality made for media. Deviating from the script can mean a quick fall from grace.

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Where to Find the Roasted Chicken That Chef Jesse Schenker Mauled This Month

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L'Artusi
At The Gander (15 West 18th Street, 212-229-9500) and Recette (328 West 12th Street, 212-414-3000), chef Jesse Schenker covers a wide range of comfort foods, like house-made pastas, charcuterie plates, and family-style suppers on Sundays. So it was no surprise that he was so smitten by another comforting dish, a full-flavored roasted chicken dish from chef Gabe Thompson of L'Artusi (228 West 10th Street, 212-255-5757):

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How Louise Vongerichten Is Building Chefs Club Into a Global Brand

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William Hereford/Courtesy Chefs Club by Food & Wine
If Louise Vongerichten hadn't pursued working in restaurants, she says, she would have become a ballet dancer. She continued dancing even as she began working at Mercer Kitchen, her family's restaurant (her father is chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten), not leaving the stage until she was 24. "It's really my number one passion," she says.

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Where to Find the Steak Quesadilla That Turned Chef Thiago Silva On to Mexican

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Los Tacos No. 1
The carne asada tacos at Los Tacos No. 1
Pastry Chef Thiago Silva spends his days making "Liquid Klondikes," s'mores pizzas, and buckets of cookies that make our knees weak at EMM Group's Catch (21 Ninth Avenue, 212-392-5978). But when a supply run to Chelsea Market introduced him to Los Tacos No. 1 (75 Ninth Avenue, 212-256-0343), he found a savory new addiction.

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Our 99 Essential Restaurant Owners Offer a Glimpse Behind the Scenes

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Dominic Perri for the Village Voice
Chicken and waffles from Buttermilk Channel
This week we present our 99 Essential Restaurants® in Brooklyn, a compendium of eateries that, together, form the borough's culinary fabric. While building the issue, we spoke to many of the people behind those restaurants, and they divulged their visions, their favorite memories, their insights into their neighborhoods, and more. Here are a few excerpts from those conversations.

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Here's Where Chef Anita Lo Had a Killer Pizza on a Recent Night Off

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Courtesy Prova
The UNICA pizza at Prova
Anita Lo is the chef and owner at the West Village's Annisa (13 Barrow Street, 212-741-6699). On a recent night off, she was craving pizza, which led her to newcomer Prova (184 Eighth Avenue, 212-641-0977), where master pizzaiolo Pasquale Cozzolino is turning out the pies.

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Kitchen Lifer: After More Than 30 Years, Ed Brown Is Still Going Strong

Categories: Chef Interviews

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Philip Greenberg
Chef Ed Brown would like you to know that you can eat dinner at Lincoln Center even if you're not there to catch a show. For the last several months, the longtime restaurateur and the company he works for, Restaurant Associates, have been working on Lincoln Center Kitchen, a "pet project," he says, that represents a divergence from the types of concepts that have long filled Avery Fisher. "We've done several different things in the Lincoln Center Kitchen space," he says. "But they've all been Italian or Italian-American. We wanted something different. Decoration-wise, you can't do a lot there, so that was gonna have to happen with the menu. We decided to start by not being Italian in any fashion. We said, let's just be American. Let's serve great food that people want to eat and buy, priced reasonably, and served with great hospitality. It sounds simple, but it's not so easy to pull off."

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Daily Bread: How Bien Cuit Is Shaking Up the Baking Industry

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©Jean Granick, courtesy Bien Cuit
I'm following Zach Golper through his U-shaped wholesale bakery in Sunset Park, learning about how Bien Cuit mixes, ferments, and bakes its bread and pastries, when he drops a recommendation that shatters everything I thought I knew about eating bread. "Don't eat bread fresh out of the oven," he says. "Let it sit and cool, so that the gas dissipates into the crumb and locks in the scent and aroma." Some breads are even better on day two, he says, when the crust is no longer crackly. I press him and his wife/business partner, Kate Wheatcroft, further about how they enjoy bread, and they tell me to tear hunks off the loaf ("Don't slice," says Golper) and eat them with a little cultured butter.

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Back to Cali: Justin Smillie Explores a New Kind of Golden State Cuisine

Categories: Chef Interviews

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Courtesy Upland
Decades after Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters and a slew of other chefs opened restaurants built on fresh produce and a confluence of global flavors, thereby pioneering California cuisine, the Golden State is experiencing a culinary comeback in New York City. Jeremiah Tower, a longtime West Coast chef and mentee of Waters, came here to take on the troubled Tavern on the Green; Jonathan Waxman, another former Waters lieutenant, is reprising Jams; and last year, Stephen Starr teamed up with chef Justin Smillie to open Upland (345 Park Avenue South, 212-686-1006), a modern meditation on what the chef ate growing up in Southern California.

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