Johnny Iuzzini's Sugar Rush Aims to Make You a Better Baker

Johnny_Iuzzini_headshot-thumb-2.jpg
Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back Thursdays for a new book.

Sugar Rush: Master Tips, Techniques, and Recipes for Sweet Baking By Johnny Iuzzini, with Wes Martin, 350 pages, Clarkson Potter, $40.

Johnny Iuzzini is kind of a big deal in the pastry world. The Culinary Institute of America grad has spent time in the kitchen with some of the country's most renowned chefs (Daniel Boulud, François Payard, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten, to name a few). In 2006, he was awarded "Pastry Chef of the Year" by the James Beard Foundation, and he has been recognized as one of the "10 Most Influential Pastry Chefs in America" by Forbes, named "Best New Pastry Chef" by New York magazine, and called one of the "Top 10 Pastry Chefs in America" for two consecutive years by Pastry Arts and Design.

More »

Probe NYC's Leafy Bounty with Ava Chin's Eating Wildly

WildEating_Cover.jpg
All images courtesy Simon & Schuster
Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back Tuesdays for a new book.

Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love, and the Perfect Meal
By Ava Chin, 245 pages, Simon & Schuster, $25

Locavores live and die by the notion that food should come from where you live; cutting the distance between farm and plate means fresher, firmer, less abused meals -- travel is tough on all living things, including the plants and meats we eat. Here in New York, we're often forced to define "local" as locales within a day's drive; "nearby," in New York, is sometimes as far as 300 miles away.

But for the urban forager, food comes from all over the city; it grows from cracks in the sidewalk; on the fringes of unkempt, outer-borough ballfields; in shaded park groves; and anywhere else plants climb toward the sun. For people like New York Times Urban Forager columnist Ava Chin, the city offers a bounty of wild-growing, edible plants, many of them frowned upon as (the horror!) weeds.

Chin eats weeds on the regular, and she lives to tell about it in her new book, Eating Wildly, which just dropped today.


More »

Here's the Key to a Great Taco

EasyGrilledLime.jpg
All photos by Noah Fecks, courtesy Countryman Press.
Easy grilled lime tacos from Dos Caminos.

Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back Tuesdays for a new book.

Dos Caminos Tacos: 100 Recipes For Everyone's Favorite Mexican Street Food
By Ivy Stark, with Joanna Pruess, 280 pages, Countryman Press, $24.95

"I have a taco notebook that grows fatter and fatter every year," Dos Caminos chef Ivy Stark writes in the introduction to her new cookbook, Dos Caminos Tacos. "It's stained with salsa and greasy fingerprints, crinkled from splashes of beer and agua fresca, and positively stuffed with menus, placemats, matchbooks, photos, and scribbled recipes from the many taquerias I have visited in search of the perfect taco....And I have found some stellar ones." She's also built a small Mexican empire, spanning six restaurants in three states, on stuffed tortillas and their ken.

More »

How Marc Forgione's Cookbook Will Make You a Better Cook

Forgione1.jpg
All photos by Evan Sung, courtesy Haughton Mifflin Harcourt
Sweet Corn Ravioli with Lobster

Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back every Tuesday for a new book.

Marc Forgione: Recipes and Stories From the Acclaimed Chef and Restaurant By Marc Forgione, with Olga Massov, 432 pages, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $40

In 2008, just as the nation hurled headlong into black financial abyss, Marc Forgione readied to open a fine dining restaurant in Tribeca. At the center of a nationwide shitstorm, where corporate accounts were being trimmed faster than a fidgety child's bangs, Forgione and company were serving $40 steaks and $20 appetizers to a shaken crowd downtown at precisely the wrong moment. "We needed to really figure out who we were as people, nevermind as restaurateurs, but as people, how the hell to survive this," Forgione says.

But against the recessional red tide, the restaurant survived, grew, and spawned offspring: two steakhouses, a modern Laotian kitchen, TV appearances, international fame, and, as of yesterday, a cookbook.


More »

Go Beyond Farm-to-Table With The Nourished Kitchen

NourishedPortugalCake.jpg
All photos by Jennifer McGruther, courtesy 10 Speed Press.
Almond rosewater currant Portugal cake.

Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back every Tuesday for a new book.

The Nourished Kitchen: Farm-to-Table Recipes for the Traditional Foods Lifestyle
By Jennifer McGruther, 320 pages, Ten Speed Press, $27.99

Jenny McGruther started her blog, "The Nourished Kitchen," in 2007 as a chronicle of her personal exploration and interest in traditional food. Last week, she released a collection of the resulting recipes in a beautiful new book, filled with lush photos she shot herself. It's an impressive and far-reaching collection, with recipes ranging from smoked salmon roe to bohemian rye bread.

A food educator and farmer's market regular, McGruther was taken by the work of Dr. Weston A. Price, a pioneering M.D. living at the turn of the last century, who trotted the globe studying how primitive cultures sourced, prepared, and ate food.

More »

High on Home Cooking: Celebrate 4/20 With the High Times Cannabis Cookbook

Spanakopita.jpg
Photo by Sara Remington, courtesy Chronicle Books
Ganja spanakopita from the Cannabis Cookbook.

Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back every Tuesday for a new book.

The Official High Times Cannabis Cookbook
By Elise McDonough and the editors of High Times Magazine, 160 pages, Chronicle Books, $18.95

In a week punctuated by Passover Seders, Easter brunches, and all the feasty, family-fraught gluttony spring can muster, we're here to make sure you don't forget that Sunday brings another venerable celebration: 4/20. In honor of this hazy holiday, we're de-shelving a 2012 book of reefer recipes that will both get you blitzed and taste good.

In typical High Times fashion, the book is a culinary journey and a trip through the annals of American counter-cultural history, with tales and recipes from folks who pushed marijuana culture and cooking forward in our great nation.

More »

Bake Passover Macaroons with Dan Cohen's Macaroon Bible

SaltedCaramel.jpg
All photos © Alice Gao, courtesy Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Salted caramel macaroons

Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back every Tuesday for a new book.

The Macaroon Bible
By Dan Cohen, 152 pages, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $17.99

Dan Cohen never thought he would write a cookbook; never thought he'd make macaroons for a living. In fact, despite growing up in a Jewish household on Long Island, the Danny Macaroons owner and founder never really ate macaroons as a child.

He went off to college, and before returning home for Passover one spring, a friend was incredulous that he didn't grow up with the cookie. He went home and asked his mom about it, and she said he could make them himself if he wanted them. He did, and it became a family tradition. He began selling the cookies after a new coffee shop opened up in his neighborhood with no food, and he brought a plate to the shop as a bribe, in hopes of scoring free coffee. The cookies were so good, the shop asked for a standing order.

More »

The Worst Recipes for Ramps on the Internet

ramps1.jpg
Image via flickr
Glory be, it's almost Ramp Season.
We're looking to seize the spring for all it's worth, lest summer come too quickly, and that means ramps, the glorious, leafy little things that will soon be raining down upon us thanks to our friendly farmers and foragers upstate, who say the greenmarket will soon be glowing green with wild leeks.

But in the last few years, ramp season has spiraled out of control, and so today, in honor of the holiday of fools, we offer you something a bit different than our usual Cookbook of the Week entry: a full-on ramp experience comprised of the worst ramp recipes on the internet.

More »

Spring up Your Pie Game With CIA's Pies & Tarts

Lattice.jpg
Photo by Ben Fink, courtesy HMH.
Strawberry balsamic pie with cookie-cutter lattice.

Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back every Tuesday for a new book.

Pies and Tarts

By The Culinary Institute of America and Kristina Peterson Migoya, 336 pages, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $29.99

In today's cookbook culture, even the best, most serious chefs fall victim to over- personalizing and editorializing their books; each recipe comes with a story and a glossy, full-color photograph, and you end up learning more about the chef and his or her background than you do about cooking great food.

But leave it to the Culinary Institute of America, and to pastry chef Kristina Peterson Migoya, to put out a book that declines to frolic in the fields, instead bringing cooking back to the kitchen (and yes, there are still beautiful photos).

More »

Plan an Over-the-Top Bacchanal for Spring: How-to With Artists Bompas and Parr

BompasParr1.jpg
All photos by Beth Evans and Nathan Pask, courtesy Pavilion
Let these guys show you a good party

Publishers love to send us cookbooks here at Fork in the Road, and often those books come straight from the chefs at some of New York's best restaurants. So we decided to share the love, and each week, we'll feature a new book, a recipe, and a few thoughts on cooking from the authors. Check back every Tuesday for a new book.

Feasting with Bompas and Parr
By Sam Bompas and Harry Parr, 224 pages, Pavilion, $34.95

Sam Bompas and Harry Parr (known for epic culinary feats like exploding food-fireworks over London, pool-sized cocktails you can row across, and, earlier, artful jellos and cocktails), published their latest book Feasting last December, just in time for the holidays.

Now seems an ideal time to pull it off the shelf; if ever a winter warranted a bacchanal-style feast for the coming of spring, it was this one. Lately, 60-degree-day teasers have titillated our tender flesh into believing spring is actually on the way, which makes what remain of these winter temperatures increasingly insufferable.

More »
Loading...