Totonno's Pizzeria Napolitano Bounces Back

Categories: Revisit, Sietsema

P1140407x.jpg
Click on any image to enlarge
From Totonno's limited roster of toppings, we ordered Italian sausage and garlic.


Coney Island's ancient pizza parlor Totonno's reopened recently after a five-month hiatus following Hurricane Sandy, which flooded the premises and did massive damage. Two years ago this month, the venerable pizzeria was nearly destroyed by fire. Could it completely recover following these two disasters?

FiTR waited a discreet two weeks after the reopening, then pedaled over there to see if it remained the best pizzeria in New York, and possibly the best in the world.


More »

Wildwood Barbeque's Texas Smoked Brisket and Jamaican Jerk Chicken Wings

P1130671x.jpg
Served with white bread, the sliced brisket at Wildwood is damn fine


[In connection with a feature that will be appearing tomorrow in the Village Voice, I've revisited half a dozen barbecues, old places I hadn't been to in years, and new places I hadn't had a chance to visit before. Here are some thumbnail sketches of my experiences.]


It's a branch of the sprawling and diversified B.R. Guest restaurant chain, so maybe you wouldn't expect Wildwood Barbeque to be very good. But, surprisingly, it can be quite good. The original pitmaster was Matt Fisher, now at Fletcher's Brooklyn Barbecue, and the place smells like hardwood smoke the minute you step in the front door.

More »

Brother Jimmy's Carolina 'Cue

P1130712x.jpg
Brother Jimmy's BBQ's pulled pork sandwich with coleslaw option, this one from the Union Square branch. Note the presence of the charred outer parts of the meat, sometimes known as "Mr. Brown."


[In connection with a feature that will be appearing this Wednesday in the Village Voice, I've revisited half a dozen barbecues, old places I hadn't been to in years, and new places I hadn't had a chance to visit before. Here are some thumbnail sketches of my experiences.]


If you're a fan of great barbecue, it's easy to ignore Brother Jimmy's. When I went 10 years ago, I found the 'cue awful. But maybe I wasn't focusing on the right things. Or maybe the place has simply gotten better, as the quality of New York barbecue has risen dramatically.

More »

Union Square Café Revisited

P1100880xx.jpg
At Union Square Café, your meal begins with a bread basket, butter with herbed sea salt, and picholine olives.


As Danny Meyer increasingly focuses his attention on an expanding Shake Shack empire, seeding locations up and down the Eastern Seaboard, you've got to wonder, is he still paying attention to his white tablecloth joints? To answer this question, a friend and I returned to his first restaurant, Union Square Café, which celebrated its 27th birthday this month.


More »

Telepan Retains Its Luster -- and Then Some

P1100421x.jpg
This luscious squash and pecan tart could be the seasonal conclusion to your meal.


CIA grad Bill Telepan had worked at Le Cirque, Gotham, and Ansonia -- the first really ambitious restaurant on the Upper West Side -- when he was propelled to fame by a three-star Times review of Judson Grill. After the untimely demise of that establishment, the chef opened the restaurant that currently bears his name on the Upper West Side in 2005. Even though the place is named after him, he observed in an interview, "It's not about me, even though the name is Telepan."


More »

Revisiting John Brown Smokehouse

P1090699x.jpg
A luscious assortment of barbecue from the relocated John Brown is Dish #43 in our countdown.

Welcome to 100 Dishes to Eat Now, the tasty countdown leading up to our "Best of 2012" issue. Tune in every day (weekends, too!) for a new dish from the Fork in the Road team.

More »

Food Gallery 32: A Revisit. Already

Categories: Revisit, Sietsema

P1090382x.jpg
You can thank Mr. Fish for this giant lunch.

[See more Revisits: Perry St | Barbuto | Daniel]


No sooner had the ink dried on the print edition of the Counter Culture review of Food Gallery 32 -- Koreatown's fabulous three-level fast food spot - than reports were coming in about stalls in the complex that seemed to be on the verge of closing. Well, changes have occurred in the last month at the wildly popular property, but they actually don't seem to amount to much. In fact, the repertoire of dishes at the seven counters has expanded slightly, if you take into account both the additions and the subtractions. Leading Fork in the Road to believe that all the franchises represented have a common owner, who's only attempting to adjust the offerings at the counters, not change the overall mix of food.


More »

Pea Shoot and Snap Pea Salad at Roman's, Dish #76. And (What the Hell!) the Rest of the Meal

P1080531x.jpg

Welcome to 100 Dishes to Eat Now, the tasty countdown leading up to our "Best of 2012" issue. Tune in each day (weekends too!) for a new dish from the Fork in the Road team.


More »

Excellent Prix Fixe Lunch Deal at Vongerichten's Perry St

P1080174x.jpg
The skate with smooshed fresh peas and a pea-shoot salad was one of the afternoon's delights.


When Jean-Georges Vongerichten opened Perry St in 2005, it was his eighth dining establishment in New York. His intention was to return to his professional roots by opening an uncomplicated and unpretentious neighborhood bistro, as his original triumph Jo Jo had been. Perry St was located in the West Village in one of three newly built Richard Meier glass towers on the West Side Highway facing the Hudson River, a dramatic location but an isolated one. What's more, the chef lived upstairs, so the place would feel almost like his own commissary, and one suspected the august French figure of sneaking downstairs from his upstairs aerie for a bite of cheese or a small Alsatian sausage in the middle of the night.


More »

Jonathan Waxman's Barbuto: A Revisit

P1070834x.jpg
Barbuto's legendary wood-roasted chicken


Named after a beloved dog, whose image appears in line drawing on the shirts of the waiters, Barbuto was a project of chef Jonathan Waxman that occurred in a somewhat fallow period of his career. When it opened in 2004, it was decidedly off the beaten path, a canteen in a West Village photo studio with a wonderful location on bucolic Washington Street, open to the summer breezes off the Hudson a block distant. Early on, the diners were models, photographers, and ad people; eventually the place developed an avid neighborhood clientele.


More »

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...