Think Pink -- Where to Drink Rose Wine This Memorial Day Weekend

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Image by Katie Burton
Rosés at the Gander
Like permission to wear white, Memorial Day weekend officially kicks off pink wine drinking season, although many of us are partial to doing both year-round. If you're grounded in the city over the holiday, here are three spots to get your summer rosé drink-a-thon started.

Celebrate "Hip, Hip Rosé" at the Gander (15 West 18th Street; 212-229-9500)
If your drinking can't wait until five o'clock, the Gander's got your back. Chef and owner Jesse Schenker has launched a summer special in the Bar Room called "Hip Hip Rosé!" which features $25 bottles of pink drink from around the world, every day, starting at 2:30 p.m. Wines hail from Italy, New York, Greece, and even the Republic of Georgia, like Pheasant's Tears Tavkeri Rosé, 2013. Other selections include a crisp, pale Provençal version from Chateau de Roquefort, and a bright, berry-scented Txakolina from Ameztoi Rubentis out of Spain's Basque region.

The list is curated to complement the new Bar Room menu, highlights of which include gnocchi with sofrito, spring peas, and ramps dusted with pecorino; and hamachi collar with worcestershire, radish, and lime.

Drink "Rosé All Damn Day" at Pearl & Ash (220 Bowery; 212-837-2370)
Snag a table early to launch your "Rosé All Damn Day" drinking session on the patio of Bowery hotspot Pearl & Ash. Interesting wines and unique rosé magnums — we expect nothing less from wine director and Renegade Wine Dinner founder Patrick Cappiello and team — will be sourced from their favorite producers. Selections drawing from California to the French pétillant naturels and crémants to Provence will rotate frequently. Offerings include a 2014 Matthiasson from Napa Valley and bubbles by Nathalie Gaubicher out of the Loire Valley. In addition to having the full Pearl & Ash menu available, the restaurant will offer a selection of oysters from either coast (six for $18).

Sample "Rosé All Day" at SixtyFive (30 Rockefeller Plaza, 65th Floor; 212-632-5000)
If you're stranded in the city on Memorial Day, cheer up. A rare opportunity to drink and dine al fresco with sweeping views of the Manhattan skyline has opened up, and you'll have fewer folks to battle for it. On Monday, May 25, SixtyFive, the cocktail bar and lounge steps from the iconic Rainbow Room on the 65th floor of 30 Rockefeller Plaza, will host "Rosé All Day." The theme "Rosé All Day" is a misnomer; SixtyFive doesn't open until 5 p.m., although specials run until midnight, effectively giving you a seven-hour drinking "day."

Glasses of sparkling rosé and prosecco will be on offer for $10 all night, while wine flights of Fritsch rosé of Zweigelt, Josep Foraster cava rosé, and Sakura Emaki sake rosé will be available for $15 (two-ounce pours of each). Complement your wine with bites from the recently launched small-plates menu, with dishes like spicy tuna tacos with smoked ancho mayo, and fried garlic or langoustine tartare with peanut, tofu, and chilled tom yum broth.



Drink From the Tap at This All-Keg Wine Bar

Categories: Wine

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Michael Groth
Row of Taps at Lois

Named for its Alphabet City Loisada location, Lois (98 Loisada Avenue; 212-475-1400), an all-tap wine bar, feels long overdue in a city once on the cusp of embracing the movement. Several years ago, taps with local wines began popping up at bars around the city — North Fork wineries were early, eager proponents of the system, while kegged-wine forerunner Gotham Project began distributing a Finger Lakes riesling. Yet, perplexingly, nobody capitalized on that momentum. Maybe there weren't enough good wines in kegs to justify an entire bar dedicated to them? Gotham Project certainly endured growing pains: The wines it sourced in its early years were awful — and often priced too high by its restaurateur clients, negating its value proposition. I stopped ordering tapped wine for a long time as a result.


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Why South Africa Is One of the Most Exciting Wine Regions in the World

Categories: Wine

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Lauren Mowery for the Village Voice
Swartland Mullineux vineyards
Lurching forward, rocking back, the black Jeep fought for purchase on the jagged rocks and loose soil of the Paardeberg mountain slope. Perched on the edge of the leather seat, I grasped the roll bar above me to avoid swaying into my co-passenger's lap. Four adults had squeezed into the barely three-person rear of the vehicle as rides into the eucalyptus forest, our destination that evening, were scarce.

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The Grape Frontier: Patrick Cappiello Leads a Revolution in Wine

Categories: Interviews, Wine

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Evan Sung
Not even ten years ago, most serious wine drinkers in this city were of a pretty elite group — they were suits with deep bank accounts who cellared Burgundy and Bordeaux and finished nights with $1,000 bottles ordered off the lists of wine meccas like Cru and Veritas. But sometime in the last decade, interest in wine began to seep past traditional boundaries, hooking enthusiasts with much more meager budgets. These drinkers pushed into underrated regions, looking for wines that wouldn't drain their savings in one shot. They drank funky and unusual wines, and forwent the white-tablecloth temples in favor of more casual restaurants. And they were led into this brave new frontier by people like Patrick Cappiello, the wine director at Pearl & Ash (220 Bowery, 212-837-2370) and newly opened Rebelle (218 Bowery, 917-639-3880).

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Here's How One New Yorker Got Her Master's of Wine

Categories: Wine

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Michael Seto
New York has long been a hotbed of successful women. Before Hillary, the state sent Geraldine Ferraro to receive the first female nomination by a major party for the White House. Edith Wharton explored social hypocrisy in her acclaimed books. Sonia "From the Bronx" Sotomayor sits on the bench of America's highest court.

Manhattan is also the epicenter of America's fine-wine industry, the ranks of which ambitious women have been slowly but steadily infiltrating. Formerly the province of Caucasian gentlemen (and not-so-chivalrous gents), several of the industry's leading ladies derive from the unusually high pool of Masters of Wine living locally.

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Here Are NYC's Best Wine Tastings in April

Categories: Wine

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Lauren Mowery for the Village Voice
Sun setting over Portugal's Alentejo wine region
Spring makes her stunning debut not with the blustery, wet weather forecast for this week, but with a knockout lineup of wine tastings from three stellar regions: Willamette, Oregon; Corsica, France; and Portugal. Rather wine than sun, right? Here's where to taste this month.

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Bright and Crisp, Drink Wine From British Columbia

Categories: Wine

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Lauren Mowery for the Village Voice
Vineyards of Painted Rock
Acid: Wine needs it for balance. It makes your mouth salivate, cuts through fat and cream, keeps wines fresh, especially sweet ones, and helps the contents age gracefully in the bottle. But too much of it, and the drinking experience mimics sucking a tart, mouth-puckering lemon. Too little of it, and the wine tastes flabby, or flat, or even syrupy, like bad store-bought margarita mix.

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How to Do Valentine's Day Like a Wine Pro

Categories: Wine

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Rob Lawson

What does a wine lover want on Valentine's Day? Definitely not to fight for the right to overpay for an underwhelming "special occasion" menu and a glass of mystery "Champagne." Consider one of these four low-stress, high-reward, wine-based experiences instead.


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Notes From Peru's Pisco Trail and Where to Drink a Pisco Sour in NYC

Categories: Wine

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All photos by Lauren Mowery for the Village Voice
This Saturday, shake up a Peruvian cocktail in honor of National Pisco Sour Day (celebrated on the first Saturday of February). As appreciation for the Latin American spirit grows, quality-minded brands are hitting NYC shelves while bartenders embrace pisco's spectrum of flavors for a range of uses.

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Why Pairing Wine With Your Super Bowl Snacks Is Not Pretentious

Categories: Wine

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Lauren Mowery for the Village Voice
Wine shouldn't be foisted onto every culinary event; no matter how grand or mundane, some matches are better left alone: the Kentucky Derby and bourbon, or bagels, lox, and black coffee (OK, a glass of Champagne wouldn't be so terrible with either). "Super Bowl & Beer" sounds like another archetype that doesn't need tinkering. But there's a case to be made for wine.

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