We Should Be More Cynical About Albums Claiming to Change the World

Categories: Reviews

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The Knife
There's no denying that The Knife's Shaking the Habitual is a significant work of art. It's mystic, cold, brutal, and darkly groovy. There are moments where it seems The Knife is trying to be as unpleasant as possible, like the frosty, 19-minute passage "Old Dreams Waiting To Be Realized," which comes together like a nasty anxiety-attack. Or the 37-second ear-scraping snippet "Oryx," which is blaringly intrusive in the most artistic of ways. Taken as a whole, the album feels like it's about something, in the way that many hoity-toity borderline-operatic albums feel rife with commentary. It's powerful, it's unique, it's transformative - Karin and Olof Dreijer are smart people who deserve to have their music studied.

But come on. Shaking the Habitual isn't near as important as we're all pretending it is. At least not yet.

The press and public have been incredibly eager to unpack all the philosophy and radical social themes allegedly imbued in Shaking the Habitual. This mostly comes from an interview the duo did with Pitchfork late last month where they spent almost the entire conversation detailing all the queer, feminist, and alternative political ideas that influenced the direction of the record's sound. "We read so much and all these ideas steered our choices when it came to sound and rhythm," said Olof Dreijer. This has created a foundation for a lot of bluster. Buzzfeed's Matthew Perpetua wrote a semi-review, claiming the record demonstrated its ideology through relentless aesthetic dedication to queasiness. Like the sounds themselves were trying to articulate the visceral feeling of being on the wrong side of social justice. Lindsay Zoladz explored the idea that perhaps instead of encoding alternate thought in difficult music, it might be more effective, and more universal, to simply write the greatest "four-minute dancefloor anthem ever written about fracking." There was also something on Gawker that lost itself in a flimsy premise that claimed Shaking the Habitual and "Accidental Racist" had a lot in common.

All of this is fine. It's good to talk about what music means and represents, and how we ought to digest and respond as a society. But there's one inescapable issue with the entirety of our discourse. Simply put, if you were to listen to Shaking the Habitual without paying attention to any of the conversation around it, I seriously doubt you would spend any time thinking about male privilege. There is nothing politically self-evident about the music. It's a record that sounds like it's about vampires, hell, mysticism, isolation, anxiety, brutality, and being very cold. You would never think about Judith Butler, there would be no grounds for "Accidental Racist" comparisons - we are aesthetically-driven listeners, and it's pretty hard to say the music of Shaking The Habitual challenges us on any high-intellectual level. It's nothing but flavor, it is not Fear of a Black Planet, and it's time we admit that the record is almost tertiary to the socially-charged discussion.


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27 comments
bobbker
bobbker

@marathonpacks Wait, who is pretending that this record is "important"? It's the 50 hottest GIFs of writers attacking straw men, VV.

morayati
morayati

@marathonpacks I guess it depends on whether a line like "all the guys and the signori, who will write my story?" hits you in the gut

morayati
morayati

@marathonpacks re: "doubt you would spend any time thinking about male privilege." -- I sensed that in "Full of Fire" before the interviews

morayati
morayati

@marathonpacks I mean... I don't necessarily disagree with the premise, but you can tell a man wrote this piece.

jeremypgordon
jeremypgordon

@luke_winkie I don't know, I think a lot of it is self-evidently political; what other way do you read the lyrics to "Full of Fire"?

dynamofire
dynamofire

@luke_winkie I like this a lot, but I have to ask: do you really think ANYBODY listening to the Knife is NOT reading about the Knife?

jeremypgordon
jeremypgordon

@luke_winkie Or, shit, even a title like "Fracking Fluid Injection" & the music within; it's all right there in front.

luke_winkie
luke_winkie

@jeremypgordon For sure, there's totally moments, but the intense specificity we talk about the record, I think, comes from that interview

dynamofire
dynamofire

@luke_winkie Why is that an issue? Isn't the issue over-celebration combined with a lack of context?

dynamofire
dynamofire

@luke_winkie if we are only supposed to react to the album itself, w/o the context of interviews+commentary, why is there music journalism?

dynamofire
dynamofire

@luke_winkie Is there a recent work you'd say was judged fairly, totally separate from the "PR campaign"/the band simply talking about it?

luke_winkie
luke_winkie

@dynamofire I'm criticizing the listeners for buying into how The Knife framed it 100%, we should be a little more self-reflective

dynamofire
dynamofire

@luke_winkie So you're criticizing the album for not being upfront enough about its ideology?

luke_winkie
luke_winkie

@dynamofire I don't think I'm talking about that, the comparison to FOBP was about how intensely woven the ideology was to the music

dynamofire
dynamofire

@luke_winkie Also the Knife works with academic/privileged ideas for a privileged/well-read audience. Not the same kind of "revolutionary."

dynamofire
dynamofire

@luke_winkie OK, that makes total sense. Still, false comparison: FOBP/Public Enemy wasn't an instant "revolution," was it?

luke_winkie
luke_winkie

@dynamofire I guess when I say issue I'm talking about forming an album's meaning via the statements of its creators. Which is hard to avoid

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