The Guitar Will Never Die (Says Henry Rollins)

Categories: Pazz & Jop

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Louisa Bertman

Is the day of the guitar band over, or at least on hiatus? It's a good question. It is hard to think of a single contemporary musician who is considered a "guitar hero."

Music is always moving, always changing. Perhaps not as noticeably in the mainstream, where it seems to be about the singer, the choreography, and "the show," but in the tributaries, where the real work is being done, music is in a constant state of redefinition and evolution. As an avid listener, I try to keep an open mind. This has served me well. I can't keep up with all the records I buy these days, both new and on cool re-issue.

See also: Free Energy, Ty Segall and the Problem Facing Guitar-Based Music

That being the case, I don't listen to nearly as much guitar-driven music as I did years ago. While the sound is still part of my life, I do find well over half of my listening to be on the instrumental and avant side of things, where often a guitar is not the predominant instrument, if it's present at all. This trend in my listening is not due to a lack of great guitar bands or players. It is simply because I try to spread myself as thinly over the vast array of choices available as I can. It's not as if there hasn't always been a ton of music to be enjoyed, but since the 1980s I have made a concerted effort to expand the perimeter of my musical appreciation.

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I think that oversaturation is a good place to start. I listen to a lot of music. As much as I can, actually. It has been my obsession since I was very young. In recent years, I have noticed the guitar often move to the back and to the side at a lot of live shows. However, that doesn't mean guitar music has lost its appeal. I think there is just more eclecticism in independent music. Curious, innovative young artists are searching for other sounds and textures to work with. I am so thankful that they are doing so. It has made modern independent music completely exciting and compelling.

Thankfully, music doesn't always have to be three chords and attitude to get it across. At this point, I can't imagine listening to one kind of music besides good music.

The appeal of guitar music will never die. There, I have predicted the future, and it's full of guitars. It is the most mass produced and sold instrument in the world and works just fine electric or acoustic. The guitar allows someone, with little effort, to bang out some rudimentary chords and express themselves. The portability and affordability of the guitar will always keep it in play. It is an instrument that is easily enjoyed alone to preserve one's sanity. It's one of humankind's best inventions.

I have an analog mind that was raised on the likes of Led Zeppelin, Ted Nugent, and Aerosmith. They were a small part of the FM radio I was listening to, which in those days was surprisingly diverse. But these were the bands I was seeing live, where I made a real connection with music. The power of an amplified guitar was a life changing experience for me.

It was punk rock that cemented my love for guitar music. Being able to be right at the front (or damn close) at Ramones, Cramps, 999, Gang of Four, Buzzcocks, Bad Brains, Clash, Damned, and Minor Threat shows, where I could actually feel the music, I mean really feel it, was huge for me. I have had the same connection at jazz shows, but for me, the volume and aggression that is present in a lot of guitar music is irresistible. I am growing older, but those sounds still move me. It could be at this point a Pavlovian response, but I don't think so. I think the guitar is just a beautiful-sounding instrument that allows for incredible individuality, like the styles of Robert Fripp and John Fahey: two different worlds, one basic instrument, both amazing.

See also: Six Punk Bands We Don't Need To Talk About Anymore

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50 comments
Heidi Sullivan
Heidi Sullivan

Pavlov's punks salivating to the sounds of super slinkies!

TheoBatarini
TheoBatarini

@henryrollins Couldnt agree more. Take Gogol Bordello, The Noisettes, The Jim Jones Revue as best examples to proove this. Rock&Roll

0birion
0birion

@henryrollins whats the matter henry? know how to write an article but dont know how to write back to persons trying to interact with you?

0birion
0birion

@henryrollins the guitar is DEAD! who was the last great innovative guitarist to arise and lead the rest to the next stone? dead i say.

RugbySkin
RugbySkin

@henryrollins liked your recommendations on more recent guitar bands, will give them a listen.

Marc Okon
Marc Okon

I wish that were true, but many said the same about Jazz instruments and look what happened. Guitars may well see a resurgence, but the likely dominance of EDM type shit and its derivatives as well as toxic puerile pop will be here for some time.

Patchoulidiver
Patchoulidiver

@henryrollins Had the same feeling center stage at a Rollins show, well said, the guitar & guitarist shall remain.

blueyedirishguy
blueyedirishguy

@henryrollins My top 5 Rollins band guitar riffs: All I want, You didn't need, The end part of love Long, Starve, Brother Interior

Shuggles76
Shuggles76

@henryrollins talented Musicians will win out in end over talented mixers, producers, & marketers which is what a lot of mainstream music is

angelanova
angelanova

"The appeal of guitar music will never die. There, I have predicted the future, and it's full of guitars. It is the most mass produced and sold instrument in the world and works just fine electric or acoustic. The guitar allows someone, with little effort, to bang out some rudimentary chords and express themselves. The portability and affordability of the guitar will always keep it in play. It is an instrument that is easily enjoyed alone to preserve one's sanity. It's one of humankind's best inventions."

Well expressed. I agree. 

drrxpress
drrxpress

@henryrollins read it, your right on, you forgot, as many do. Justice League! Thanks for being and inspiration, you square! Mean that w/love

MerglerB
MerglerB

@henryrollins - Thank you, Henry. I'm sharing your article with some student musicians tomorrow. No doubt they'll feel it too.

maf_filion
maf_filion

@henryrollins occasionally someone comes along and re-energizes an instrument, a style or attitude. Hope this happens to the guitar again.

cartoonistjohnb
cartoonistjohnb

@henryrollins Good article. Thank you. It's a pleasure to read your words, Henry. You've got a distinctive writing voice.

mysonlovesjack
mysonlovesjack

@henryrollins I'd put forth that Jack White is pretty close to a current "guitar hero". Not many sounds better than a well played guitar.

elaineshute
elaineshute

Although we listen to many kinds of music in our house, guitar-based rock has long reigned supreme on the stereo. Loved your blog, but would argue there are always "guitar gods" on the scene. Currently Gary Clark,Jr., Derek Trucks, and, as always, Richard Thompson fit the bill for me. 

0birion
0birion

@henryrollins wanna know why? because you sit around writing articles on it instead of seeking out and helping those with mad skills, unable

obirion
obirion

@Shuggles76 @henryrollins keep dreaming. i mean that in both a literal and sarcastic sense.

angelanova
angelanova

That's a cool question. I think they continue to live on in the world through their sound recordings and I hope their souls make it to heaven,

ILPS9000
ILPS9000

@GeneralNeurosis

Probably because Petty is not the lead guitarist in the Heartbreakers, Mike Campbell (an excellent guitarist) is...

angelanova
angelanova

Oh, my! Jack White is on my bucket list of guitar players I must see live one day.

boredomk1lls
boredomk1lls

@0birion@henryrollins

What a shit thing to say. People like Jimi Hendrix or Joe Satriani didn't have any help with their guitar playing; they did their own thing by themselves and became famous for it.

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