Miley Cyrus Isn't "Hurting Women," The Patriarchy Is

Categories: Miley Cyrus

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Screenshot via "We Can't Stop"
Feminism! It still exists even when Miley writhes around like so.
On Monday, the New York Observer published a column on Miley Cyrus by Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, Orthodox Judaism's answer to Dr. Phil, asking "Is Miley Cyrus Harming Women?". Boteach pontificates frequently on sex, love and morality, but this time he reached way, way up on his tippy-toes and attempted to solve the riddle known as the existence of Miley; namely, is the young lady hurting other ladies, with her relentless display of her vagina and breasts and such? Does a woman's brain, as the sub-hed to his article asks "stand a chance against her genitals?" (And does that mean there's going to be some sort of awful, squishy cage-match between those two parts of my body later? Because I am not ready.)

Boteach probably didn't write the terrible headline or sub-hed on that story, but he's certainly responsible for the rest of the mess that follows. The basic premise of the piece is a pretty old song. Perhaps you've heard it: when young women like Miley run around in their undergarments or--gasp!--their altogether, they're harming all women. Or rather, they're hurting the image that men have of all women, making it harder for men to respect us.

He writes:

See also: Miley Cyrus Redeems Herself on SNL


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Miley Cyrus Redeems Herself on SNL

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To say that Miley Cyrus has over-saturated all channels of popular culture since her notorious VMA performance on August 25 would be, well, kind. Her maniacal, tongue-sprouting grin or gyrating, vinyl-clad body--or both!--have been ubiquitous since. Dialogue detailing cultural appropriation and the racist implications of her "We Can't Stop" video and its VMA treatment began as soon as the broadcast of the awards show ended. Late last week, Sinead O'Connor wrote an open letter to Cyrus, addressing Cyrus' recent Rolling Stone cover story and comments she'd made citing O'Connor as an inspiration for her look and the "Wrecking Ball" video. In her letter, O'Connor begs Cyrus to fire anyone who lets her "prostitute" herself for the benefit of the music industry while reminding her that her records are fine enough on their own without her writhing up and down on a taut chain for a music video. Cyrus responded by mocking O'Connor. Hours after that, famed lens-toting creeper Terry Richardson posted a series of photos that started the backlash up all over again, and Miley, with her nipples all over the internet and YouTube plays for the "Wrecking Ball" leaping close to 200 million, told Sinead that she couldn't respond to her latest letter because she was too busy practicing for her hosting/performing gig on Saturday Night Live.

In short: "I'm just being Miley" has segued into "I'm just being a walking wet dream of a dissertation for a pop culture sociologist," and all of this came to a glorious, table-turning head for this season's Disney Girl Gone Bad on SNL.

See also: Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

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Miley Cyrus Takes Stand on Syrian Conflict in Her "Wrecking Ball" Video

Categories: 2013, Miley Cyrus

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Last week, President Obama announced he would attack Syria after evidence that the country had used chemical weapons on it's own people surfaced--should he receive the authorization of Congress. Needless to say, it has sent many political scholars into a frenzy. Miley Cyrus is among them. On September 9th of 2013, she released the video for her newest single "Wrecking Ball," directed by a man who once took advantage of one of our writers, in which she uses stunning minimalist imagery to loudly voice her controversial support for American intervention in Syria.

See also: Dissecting the Politically Charged Subtext of Miley Cyrus's "We Can't Stop" Video

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Twerk Pioneers the Ying Yang Twins Talk Twerking and Miley Cyrus (TWERK!)

Categories: Miley Cyrus

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It seems today everybody's twerking for the weekend. Now that America's at a point where even Miley Cyrus is twerking and Jay-Z is shouting it out, it's time to look back at the pioneers who paved the way for the twerk takeover. The Ying Yang Twins brought twerking to a national level with their breakthrough 2000 hit "Whistle While You Twurk" and, with the Twerkpocalypse upon us, have returned to take their rightful place on the Twerking throne with their new wonderfully titled mixtape Ass in Session. The Twins bring their all time twerking classics to the Gramercy Theater tomorrow, July 26th, and we had the tremendous (or is that twerk-mendous) fortune to speak with the Twins themselves, Kaine and D-Roc, on taking their twerk empire to the next level.

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Dissecting the Politically Charged Subtext of Miley Cyrus's "We Can't Stop" Video

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Few starlets have undergone as drastic and public a personal and musical transformation as Miley Cyrus. She chopped off her long brown locks for a styled blonde Mohawk-ish thing. She exchanged her trademark country twang for a sheepish auto-tuned "baaah!" She dropped off her guitar and popped up her ass. The one thing that hasn't changed about Miley Cyrus, however, is that her music is best experienced with the sound off. This is especially true of the music video for her latest song, "We Can't Stop."

See also: Miley Poppin' Molly: How Miley Cyrus Officially Made Singing About Drugs Uncool

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Miley Poppin' Molly: How Miley Cyrus Officially Made Singing About Drugs Uncool

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It's not officially summer until a former tween star does something that sparks outrage across the world. This summer, Miley Cyrus is making a major comeback as the source of that anger with her new single "We Can't Stop," the Mike WiLL produced, beach-friendly jam that sounds more like a slowed down and inferior version of "Party in the U.S.A." than something strikingly new from the former Disney star. While the song's sound itself is tame, it's the lyrical references that have been cause for some concern, namely the hints at poppin' Molly ("So la da da di we like to party / Dancing with Molly / Doing whatever we want") and snorting cocaine ("And everyone in line in the bathroom / Trying to get a line in the bathroom").

See also: What Will the Miley Cyrus/Tyler, the Creator Collaboration Sound Like?

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Running The Numbers: The Four-Disc, 73-Track Bob Dylan Covers Comp With Miley, Ke$ha, Lenny, And Many Others

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Today Amnesty International releases Chimes Of Freedom, a really, really huge compilation of bob Dylan covers by artists both canonized and obscure. Trying to analyze such a huge undertaking can only be done in one way: Mathematically.

Amount of music in this collection: 73 songs on four CDs, totaling 313 minutes and 24 seconds. (You get three additional songs if you buy it digitally, for an additional eight minutes' worth of music.)

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Miley Cyrus Takes Her Party In The USA To Occupy Wall Street

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Here is a fun sentence to type: Miley Cyrus released a video in support of Occupy Wall Street! The clip, posted Saturday, pairs a remix of her 2010 song "Liberty Walk" with footage from the Occupy protests, and is so incongruous that when I first saw it I spent about five minutes verifying that it was an official Miley production. If the song hadn't gotten such wide coverage, I'm not sure I'd still be able to say with complete certainty that the former Disney Channel star was responsible for it. The clip looks like a tribute video (fan-made clips that take, say, a Taylor Swift song and put it over footage from Twilight or Glee to emphasize the deep emotional relationships between the characters); it even opens with the suspiciously iMovie-looking white-text-on-black-screen epigraph "This is dedicated to the thousands of people who are standing up for what they believe in..."

In truth, it's not so out of character. Cyrus is a longtime vlogger, and her ability to use new media in an accessible, authentic-seeming way has been a huge boon to her popularity. But for those more used to the image of Miley Cyrus as a slick, corporate pop star, the apparent sincerity and homegrown flavor of the video were hard to process.

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100 & Single: Late Bloomer Nicki Minaj Scores Summer Smash Off Aging Album

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Imagine if People named an actor "Sexiest [Gender] Alive" months before he or she had released a hit movie or TV show. It's not unthinkable, certainly—think back to the '90s and the Julia Ormonds and Skeet Ulrichs who scored Next Big Thing magazine covers before face-planting in a flop movie—but it's damned unlikely. Usually chart-topping, newsstand-blanketing fame comes after the public has gone gaga for the emerging star's wares.

In music, it's a lot easier to be a best-seller without blanketing the airwaves. Generations of quirky rock acts, from Jethro Tull in the '70s to the Arcade Fire in 2010, have topped the Billboard album chart without even scraping the Hot 100. But pop, R&B and hip-hop acts generally live and die by the single; hit songs lead to hit albums, full stop.

Nicki Minaj spans all of these genres; she's a new queen of hip-hop who sings like an R&B diva and aspires to pop domination. If anyone should need a big radio hit to become a best-selling star, it's her. So it's a total head-scratcher that only this week, Minaj scores her first Top 10 pop hit—a year after she dropped her first major-label single, and more than four months after Pink Friday topped the album chart.

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A Nation of Justin Bieber Fans Threaten to Kill Miley Cyrus on Twitter

Last night, the Canadian industry savior and haircut titan Justin Bieber overcame a cold and a guest appearance from Sean Kingston to sell out Madison Square Garden. The performance was being taped for an upcoming 3D biopic, and thus Bieber brought out the big guns: Boyz II Men. (Usher, Jaden Smith, and Ludacris were also in the building.) But the evening's reported highlight? A duet with 17-year-old Miley Cyrus, who just happened to have separated from her boyfriend last week. Together, they sang "Overboard," a song Bieber initially recorded with his opening act, Jessica Jarrell. At the time, the substitution of Cyrus for Jarrell seems to have played well with the crowd--listen to those screams!--but Bieber nation is a notoriously protective bunch (see: Kim Kardashian), and the backlash against Cyrus online was swift, immediate, and fearsome. Watch your back, Miley:

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