Free Laughs and Free Cupcakes in This Week's Cheap Comedy Roundup

Categories: Comedy

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Pulled from @HMWebseries Twitter profile page
High Maintenance star Ben Sinclair hosts a screening and Q&A at the Bell House this Thursday.
This week in Cheap Laughs, we have word lovers, G'n'R covers, Web series discovery, a blessed anniversary, and free cupcakes. Here's our rundown of the best in independently produced New York comedy this week.

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Let the Dude From the Sonic Commercials Be Your New Comedy Hero

Categories: Comedy

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The guy holding the hotdog on the right is extremely funny.
This week in Cheap Laughs, we have square deals, pizza steals, slammed meals, and copped feels. Here's our rundown of the best in independently produced New York comedy this week.

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The Best of This Year's New York Comedy Festival

Categories: Comedy, Festivals

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The 2014 New York Comedy Festival went down from November 5 through 9 in over 20 venues around the city. It once again boasted a stellar lineup of comics, which made it difficult for us to pick and choose which shows to actually put on our "must see" list. That said, it had to be done and, ultimately, we were beyond happy with the choices we made. So here is the wrap-up of the funny that we were able to catch this year.

See also: Comedy's Biggest Names Talk About Their Relationship With New York

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Andrew Dice Clay Talks NYC Upbringing, New Memoir The Filthy Truth

Categories: Comedy

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Sheepshead Bay native Andrew Dice Clay is likely the most misunderstood comedian of the past 40 years. An actor at heart, his over-the-top stage character -- part social satire, part rock 'n' roll bombast -- has been boycotted, banned, panned by critics (including those at the Village Voice) and, in the mid '90s, outright dismissed as has-been.

Yet his landmark accomplishments remain. Clay was the first stand-up to sell out the Madison Square Garden arena...which he did not just once, but two nights in a row. He's headlined more than 300 arena shows. His total lifetime ticket sales hover somewhere around 13 million.

After 15 years in showbiz jail, Clay returned with memorable appearances on Entourage, in Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine, and in his fittingly titled Showtime special, Indestructible. Memoir The Filthy Truth is out this Tuesday, he plays a '70s radio-station magnate in Martin Scorsese's upcoming HBO series, and a biographical documentary is in the works.

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The Roast Battle: 'Like Fight Club for Comedians,' Says Jeffrey Ross

Categories: Comedy

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Photo of Jeffrey Ross in a hat provided by Jeffrey Ross
Roastmaster General, comedian Jeff Ross has roasted tens of thousands of people -- maybe more, he says.

His first official Roast was of "actor" and ponytail god Steven Seagal, and he opened with this joke: "A lot of you don't know me, but I feel uniquely qualified to be here today because I'm also a shitty actor." Today, Jeff Ross is practically a household name. He has been the Roastmaster at the venerable Friars Club, and is part of every Comedy Central Roast, usually scoring the biggest "OH NO HE DIIIIIN'T"s of the night.

"Everything is a roast! Even in an airport with strangers, or at Thanksgiving," says Ross. "I can't help myself!"

See also: Roasts + Rap Battles = Roast Battle, the Hottest Thing in L.A.'s Comedy Scene

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A Movie Called Women Aren't Funny Proves Women Are Funny

Categories: Comedy, Festivals

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When you get funny people together in a room, pure magic can happen. That said, when you get two funny people on the phone together who happen to be married, well, you just sit back and listen to the antics ensue. That's exactly what happened when we got Bonnie McFarlane and Rich Vos on the phone to discuss the incredible movie they made, Women Aren't Funny. If you know anything about these two, their banter is for the ages (which they prove regularly on their popular podcast My Wife Hates Me) so, yes, this interview was the easiest we've ever done.

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Left-Field Picks at This Year's New York Comedy Festival

Categories: Comedy

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Late Night With Seth Meyers
Grown-Up Annie, Michelle Wolf
It's a special edition of Cheap Laughs this week. The New York Comedy Festival has taken over town, rolling through our five boroughs (well, three) with the unstoppable force of a dangerously packed clown-car. Some of the talent on display are megastars already. We will not recommend buying a ticket for Bill Cosby, Marc Maron, or Maria Bamford. Because if you need a stranger's recommendation to do those things, you need to pay closer attention. We're highlighting some left-field comedy choices that are worth your time amid a crowded slate. Let's get into it.

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Comedy's Biggest Names Talk About Their Relationship With New York

Categories: Comedy

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Justin Stephens
Amy Schumer: "I like these sick, sad, loud, honest people. I fit in."
Throughout the middle part of the 20th century, comedians like Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Joan Rivers, Woody Allen, and Bill Cosby shared stage time with folk musicians, Beat poets, and activists in the basement bars and coffeehouses of Greenwich Village. The Improv Comedy Club, founded in 1963 in Hell's Kitchen, expanded to a Hollywood outpost in 1974, paving the way for the first -- and, with two dozen venues, still the largest -- chain of comedy clubs in the United States. The Upper West Side's Comic Strip, opened in 1976, would be where the likes of Chris Rock, Eddie Murphy, Jerry Seinfeld, and Dave Chappelle were discovered. The 1980s saw MacDougal Street's Comedy Cellar emerge as the most inviting workout room in the country for talent including Ray Romano, Louis C.K., Jon Stewart, Dave Attell, and Colin Quinn.


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Comedian Mark Normand Owes His Career to a Joke About Wheat Thins

Categories: Comedy

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Mark Normand on Last Comic Standing
Comedian Mark Normand is an ever-present showman. He is always looking to dazzle his audience, real or imagined, whether performing a set at the Comedy Cellar or slurping pancakes drenched in cheap syrup across from me during his interview. When he speaks, he sounds like a 1940s horse-racing announcer. A fellow comic describes him as a "cartoon character," which seems to work for the New Orleans native who has become a staple in New York's stand-up scene over the past seven years, averaging a half-dozen spots a night -- when he isn't on the road, touring.

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Follow New York Comic Sam Morril from Club to Club as He Works Out This Joke

Categories: Comedy

Sam Morril has been a stand-up comic in New York for almost a decade. He has been on Conan and Comedy Central, and performs in comedy clubs all over New York City and nationally. Before making it to the stage, Morril would hand out flyers for comedy shows -- doing so, luckily, only for a short stint. Morril met Patton Oswalt after a show in New York, who advised him to "do open mics, just go to every open mic." Morril took his advice. "They were awful," he reflects, "humiliating and awful. But I just kept doing them."

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