Daily Flog: Obama in PA, Stevens in DC, Lieberman in WSJ, Russians in GA (non-US)

(Roy Edroso of Runnin' Scared here. Even gadflies have to rest their wings sometimes, so Ward Harkavy is on vacation and I'm filling in as best I can for a few days. )

New York Times: "Rural Swath of Big State Tests Obama"

Those bitter Pennsylvanians are once again hauled out by the allegedly Obama-worshipping Times. Though "Labor operatives line up behind Mr. Obama, and about a third of the 35 white voters who were interviewed leaned toward him," the Clinton voters are thought to be not entirely on board, so it's all in the hands of the guys who think Obama refused to shake hands with the troops.


Washington Post: "Judge Won't Move Trial For Stevens To Alaska"

The fixer from the 49th State will have to stand trial (for failing to disclose receipt of gifts) in Washington instead of Alaska, where citizens have sent him to the Senate seven times. On the bright side, everyone in DC, from judges to jurors, knows how the game is played. The downside is that Stevens has been playing it for a long time and some people may think it's time he lost one.


Wall Street Journal: "Lieberman Agonistes"

This editorial suggests the Senator from Connecticut bothers Democrats because he's an apostate, and Republicans (the kind who write to the Journal, anyway) because he's a liberal. The reliably pro-Republican paper naturally admires Lieberman for bolting the Democrats, and suggests this will bring out his conservative instincts under a McCain Administration, but while Lieberman would "be a better vice president than many oft-mooted Republicans," the Journal prefers McCain keep him on the down-low lest the rubes revolt.


Los Angeles Times: "Russia to Keep Soldiers in Georgia."

Rather than wait till Friday's announced pullout to reveal how far they're willing to go, Russia signals that it intends to continue looking after its South Ossetian interests from the Georgian side, with some troops remaining "just outside the Georgian city of Gori." The nationalistic argument plays well inside Russia, but not with the U.S., which is "attempting to dispatch several military vessels" to the Georgian coast.

Daily Flog: Russian Bear Goes Bullish; Pakistan Dithers; Obama Strikes Back

(Roy Edroso of Runnin' Scared here. Even gadflies have to rest their wings sometimes, so Ward Harkavy is on vacation and I'm filling in as best I can for a few days. )

Reuters: "Russia says troops to leave Georgia"

Having rejected a U.N. plan that would have evacuated them from a "buffer zone" on Georgia's side of the South Ossetia border, Russia agrees to abide by French President Sarkozy's original plan and withdaw its forces from deeper inside the former Soviet Socialist Republic by Friday.

The West is unmoved. Secretary of State Rice says the Russians "intend to strangle Georgia and its economy" and are "more and more the outlaw in this conflict."

The Wall Street Journal mocks the warnings NATO ministers gave Russia in Brussels ("not going to permit a new line to be drawn in Europe") as "Empty Words," because "there was no move to fast-track Georgia's bid to join NATO, nor a pledge to help the battered democracy rebuild its defenses."

Meanwhile Georgia accuses Russia of holding Georgia hostages and stealing American Humvees (which Russia admits, or rather boasts) and holds a hard line on total Russian evacuation.

It's hard to judge the level of seriousness with which these sabers are being rattled. Do Putin and Medvedev want Georgia, or just Peace With Honor in South Ossetia? Does the West have the stomach for Cold War II or any other kind of war with Russia? We'll see where the chess pieces lay on Saturday morning.


Bloomberg: "Musharraf Ouster Fails to End Deadlock Over Judges"

You'd think Musharraf's resignation would lead to at least a brief period comity among the members of the Pakistan ruling colation. But they're arguing over the dispenation of the judges Musharref fired and placed under house arrest last year to maintain the strength of his shaky dictatorship. "Sharif [of the Pakistan Muslim League] wants the judges restored through a parliamentary resolution that sends the present judiciary back home," says Bloomberg. "Zardari [of the People's Party, and husband of the late Benazir Bhutto] prefers reinstatement that also retains the current judges appointed by Musharraf on Nov. 3." Pakistan's Geo TV says Zadari also wants "indemnity" for Mushareff before the judges return, lest they wreak vengeance.

"If I were the Bush administration," the U.S. Council on Foreign Relations' Daniel Markey tells Bloomberg, "I'd kiss goodbye the chance of having a workable Pakistani government" this year. That's bad news for the Bush Administration, which has counted on Pakistan to help contain Taliban agents in the region.

Bush's weak response to the Pakistani impeachment crisis and continued support for the departed dictator suggests that he is unsure which new government faction to support -- that is, which will prevail. But with his network of foreign support crumbling worldwide, he may not have time to wait before picking a side.


New York Times: "Obama’s Ads in Key States Go on Attack"

Obama, "whose candidacy has been built in part on a promise to transcend traditional politics," has nonetheless started running "sustained and hard-hitting" negative ads against McCain on local TV, while his national ads retain a sunnier aspect. The new ads contrast what-we-worry McCain stump quotes with the dire state of the nation, and stress the connection between McCain and the unpopular current President.

Evan Tracey of TNS' Campaign Media Analysis Group calls it "go[ing] quietly negative."

The Times questions Obama's use of a clueless McCain quote on the economy that "was from a debate in January, before the economy took several turns for the worse," and says that McCain has seen been properly gloomy on the subject since. FactCheck.org also complains.

Considering that McCain's ads have of late been about how Obama is like Paris Hilton and Britney Spears, this is rich and we don't mean Frank. In negative advertising, the Obama campaign is so much more sinned against than sinning -- not to mention damaged by the relentless McCain onslaught -- that they can probably afford to ignore the pearl-clutching of the Times and FactCheck.org.

Refreshingly, Democratic strategist Steve McMahon seems to think so, too. "It’s ‘game on, the money’s in the bank," says McMahon. "Let the McCain campaign chase us around the country, if they can find us."

Daily Flog: Poland to the rescue, homicidal geezer school-bus driver, China imports gold, Georgia imports Rice, more abuse (ho-hum) of Iraqis

Running down the press:

Times: 'U.S. and Poland Set Missile Deal'

Refusing to take off their Cold War monocles, Thom Shanker and Nicholas Kulish ignore the hilarity of Condi Rice going to Georgia to simmer things down. Instead, they try to get poetic on our asses:

The deal reflected growing alarm in countries like Poland, once a conquered Soviet client state, about a newly rich and powerful Russia’s intentions in its former cold war sphere of power. In fact, negotiations dragged on for 18 months — but were completed only as old memories and new fears surfaced in recent days.

The funniest line in this super-self-consciously serious piece:

Polish officials said the agreement would strengthen the mutual commitment of the United States to defend Poland, and vice versa.

Vice versa . . . Poland defending the U.S. . . . let's see . . . oh, yeah, maybe we could get Poland to step in on behalf of Williamsburg's Poles to try to stop Manhattan developers from wrecking the Brooklyn enclave's waterfront.

Solidarność with the hipsters!

See FAIR's fresh dissection of media blubber: "Georgia/Russia Conflict Forced Into Cold War Frame."


McClatchy: 'U.S. 'no' to intervention leaves Russia in control of Georgia'

One of the best U.S. sources of world news — and probably the liveliest — the McClatchy D.C. Bureau (the old Knight-Ridder operation) is a solid site. For the full flavor of the good reporting and breezy writing, try this from Nancy A. Youssef, Tom Lasseter, and Dave Montgomery:

American officials on Thursday ended speculation that the U.S. military might come to the rescue of Georgia’s beleaguered government, confirming Russia's virtual takeover of the former Soviet republic and heralding Moscow's reemergence as the dominant power in eastern Europe.

"I don’t see any prospect for the use of military force by the United States in this situation. Is that clear enough?" Secretary of Defense Robert Gates told reporters in his first public comments since the crisis began Aug. 7.

"The empire strikes back," said Ariel Cohen, a Russia expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C.

Gates' comments came just 24 hours after President Bush dramatically announced in a televised White House appearance that American military aircraft and ships would be dispatched to carry humanitarian aid to Georgia and that the U.S. was expecting unfettered access to Georgia' ports and airports.

But Bush apparently had spoken out of turn, before Turkey, which by treaty controls access to the Black Sea, had agreed, and on Thursday, Pentagon officials said they doubted that U.S. naval vessels would be dispatched.


Slate: 'Conventional Nonsense: Making the case for a press boycott of the national political conventions'

Jack Shafer notes the foregone conclusions of these non-events. Amen.


Post: 'HILLARY PUSHES WAY ONTO STAGE'

The tab's institutional contempt for Hillary pays off in this case, because she really did push her way onto the DNC stage. Not that this is big news. But how many more shots at Hillary does the Post have left? And she is such an easy target.


Christian Science Monitor: 'Mexican citizens asked to fight crime'

Sara Miller Llana's story notes:

[I]f Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard has his way, a new corps of 300,000 residents will become watchdogs of sorts — monitoring and turning in police officials who operate outside the law.

The Times reports on the same story — citizens outraged that corrupt cops are even aiding and abetting kidnappings of children — but of course it takes the establishment side, not even noting Ebrard's call for a citizen corps.

Can you imagine a crew of 300,000 New Yorkers regularly keeping tabs on the NYPD? The Times sniffs, Don't even mention it. And its story sez:

Given the involvement of some wayward officers in the kidnapping trade, it is easy to see why victims’ relatives look outside police forces in trying to bring such nightmares to an end.

But Luis Cárdenas Palomino, director of intelligence for the federal police, says that private negotiators do not have the same experience as his veteran agents, who he says have been catching more kidnappers and freeing more victims in recent years.

No wonder that, here in NYC, the Times, with its institutionalized obeisance to authority, doesn't hold the NYPD's feet to the fire.


Post: 'TRAGIC MOM'S BABY IS SAVED'

A runaway school bus crushes pregnant NYPD traffic agent Donnette Sanz, "but a superhuman effort by 30 strangers who lifted the vehicle off her body miraculously saved her baby before she died."

Word pictures of the bus driver with his head in his hands — ""The light turned red, and I couldn't stop . . . I tried to miss her. I tried to go behind her, but she stopped and moved back, and I hit her."

Oh, by the way, we find out only at the end of this weeper that the 72-year-old driver hasn't had a license in 40 years and that his record includes "a gun bust and arrests for driving on a suspended license, grand larceny, menacing and aggravated harassment."

And he was driving a school bus — a school bus!

Most absurd quote of the day:

Mayor Bloomberg, who went to St. Barnabas to comfort [her] relatives, said, "I hope that as this child grows up, he comes to understand that his mother gave her life in service to our city, and we are forever grateful."

The Daily News account is lamer, but it does include this quote from Bloomberg:

"It is a terrible poignancy that Donnette's son's birthday will now coincide with the day his mother died."

Give Bloomberg a break. George W. Bush couldn't have connected those dots.


Post: ' "WRONG MAN" FREED AFTER 14 YRS.: BAILED OUT ON "BAD RAP" IN QNS. SLAY'

Great quote garnered by Ikimulisa Livingston:

Kareem Bellamy stepped out of Queens Supreme Court to the open arms of relatives and cheers from his relentless law team, which spent nearly four years working to get him freed.

"I hope I don't get struck by lightning," he joked in the midst of a thunderstorm. "I can't believe I'm really walking out."


Times: 'Bomber Kills 18 on Shiite Pilgrimage in Iraq'

Obsessed with Georgia, the Times editors are now consigning Iraq news to a roundup — you know, like those small-town-newspaper city council stories that always include "in other business" items.

Today's example is yet another suicide bombing. In other business, the Times adds:

And at Camp Bucca, an American military base in southern Iraq, six sailors who were working as prison guards in Iraq are facing courts-martial on charges of abusing detainees, the United States Navy said in a statement on Thursday.

Only two other brief grafs, both far down the story, about this abuse. No mention of exactly what kind of abuse is alleged or that Camp Bucca is the largest U.S. prison in Iraq, housing a staggering 18,000 Iraqis, probably none of whom have been to trial.

At least the BBC saw fit to present a separate story on this.

But the U.S. establishment press has consistently underplayed jail abuse, except when it reaches the high embarrassment level of Abu Ghraib. Remember the proud "Murderous Maniacs" at Camp Mercury near Fallujah, the U.S. soldiers who beat up prisoners for sport? If you don't, see yesterday's Daily Flog.


Post: 'TRAP PLAY TARGETS GIANTS; "SEX-TORTION PLOT" VS. COACH COUGHLIN'

Feds yesterday busted a birdbrained Philadelphia man for allegedly trying to blackmail Giants Coach Tom Coughlin with false allegations of extramarital flings with two women.

Stop right there, unless you want to walk around all day with images swirling in your brain of this aging coach naked and having sex.


Post: 'DEM'S KILLER WENT "POST-IT" '

Hed of the day, lovingly applied to a wire story:

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - The man who fatally shot the chairman of the state Democratic Party after he lost his job had a Post-it note at home with the victim's last name and phone number along with 14 guns, antidepressants and a last will and testament, according to court documents.


Wall Street Journal: 'World Economy Shows New Strain'

If you can tear yourself away from Olympic water polo for a second, remember that China is losing the gold-medal battle but is raking in the gold anyway.

The WSJ reports, in other business:

The global economy -- which had long remained resilient despite U.S. weakness -- is now slowing significantly, with Europe offering the latest evidence of trouble. . . .

With the European growth report, four of the world's five biggest economies -- the U.S., the euro zone, Japan and the U.K. -- are now flirting with recession.

China, the world's fourth-largest economy, is still expanding strongly, as are India and other large developing economies. . . .

The global weakness marks a sharp reversal of expectations for many corporations and investors, who at the year's outset had predicted that major economies would remain largely insulated from America's woes.

The Journal almost always leavens its dense reporting with a human touch (not on its inhumane editorial pages, but in news stories), and even this piece has a good morsel:

British consumers are hunkering down. "The cost of living has rocketed," says Gareth Lucas, 34 years old. He works part time at a hospital in Swansea, south Wales. With fuel costs so high, Mr. Lucas tries to fit more tasks into each car trip and no longer treats himself to cappuccino at a nearby café.

At night, to make extra cash, Mr. Lucas does gigs as a stand-up comedian -- but increasingly he performs to smaller audiences. "People just aren't going out anymore," he says.


Wall Street Journal: 'Data Raise Questions On Role of Speculators'

Suspicions confirmed: The oil market is being driven by scumbag speculators, not the "free market." The WSJ puts it into perspective:

Data emerging on players in the commodities markets show that speculators are a larger piece of the oil market than previously known, a development enlivening an already tense election-year debate about traders' influence.

Last month, the main U.S. regulator of commodities trading, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, reclassified a large unidentified oil trader as a "noncommercial" speculator.

The move changed many analysts' perceptions of the oil market from a more diversified marketplace to one with a heavier-than-thought concentration of financial players who punt on big bets.

This is a fascinating developing story — let alone a probable explanation of why gas costs so much — if only the rest of the press would take the topic seriously.

Here's the politics of it:

The . . . questions about the reliability and transparency of data in this market are feeding into efforts by Congress to impose restrictions on energy trading. Four Democratic senators on Thursday called for an internal CFTC inspector-general investigation into the timing of a July 22 release of a report led by the agency. That report concluded speculators weren't "systematically" driving oil prices. Oil prices soared until mid-July before beginning a decline.

In recent months, legislators in Congress have demanded insight about the distinction as they try to answer concerns of constituents, from companies to consumers, about what has contributed to the high price of gasoline and other fuels.



Daily Flog: Warning to whitey, desired streetcars, soiled Lennon, two Georgias, Target practice

Running down the press:

Daily News: 'First look at wife of John Lennon slayer in decades - she says let me be'

Jesus Christ! I'd forgotten that Mark David Chapman was such a sicko/twisted Lennon wannabe that he had also married a woman of Japanese descent.


Post: 'ARK. ASSASSIN GUNS DOWN TOP CLINTON ALLY'

Congratulations to the Post for not only mentioning in the second paragraph that the shooter had just been fired from a Target store but also for showing the maturity not to hammer into readers that grim irony, as I am immaturely doing right now.


Post: 'COLOR BY NUMBERS: MAC GAINS MORE WHITES VS. OBAMA'

Good story, better head. The fourth graf is key:

McCain has closed the gap by padding his lead among whites, Southerners and white evangelical Christians.

At least that should make the rest of us whites feel better — that we're not quite as bad at acting on our institutionalized, internalized racist impulses.

Being upfront about race is something that much of the media is not doing. Witness this CNN story:

"McCain, Obama to address 'values voters' "

Sens. John McCain and Barack Obama plan to appear together Saturday at a minister-moderated forum held in a church as thousands of evangelicals plan to gather in the nation's capital to pressure both men move further to the right on social issues.

"Values voters" my shiny metal ass. The rest of us also vote our "values." These are white conservative Christians (99 percent of them), so call them that in the headlines. Christ, there are even political parties in Europe that use "Christian" in their names.


Newsday: 'Revealed: Julia Child was a U.S. spy in World War II'

This AP story is old news, but it does remind us why she seemed to have such mixed feelings about turkey.


Post: 'BRETT FEELIN' UP THE CREAK'

Clever hed on this:

The 38-year-old Favre - who turns 39 in October - had his fifth practice yesterday morning for the New York Jets, but he admitted his arm wasn't exactly feeling lively.

Brett Favre is one pro athlete who talks like a real person, unlike the platitudinous Derek Jeter, for example, or the former Giant blowhard Jeremy Shockey or the guarded-beyond-all-reason, high-paid choker Alex Rodriguez. Favre sez:

"I didn't throw the ball very well this morning, underthrew some throws. No pain, but I'm 38 years old. It's got to be fatigued a little bit. . . . I felt 38 today, I'm not going to lie to you."

In his case, he probably won't. A rare celebrity.


Times: 'In a Generation, Minorities May Be the U.S. Majority'

Warning to whitey: Your reign as The Man will end sooner than predicted. Sam Roberts reports:

The census calculates that by 2042, Americans who identify themselves as Hispanic, black, Asian, American Indian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander will together outnumber non-Hispanic whites. Four years ago, officials had projected the shift would come in 2050.

The British press doesn't whitewash this news with P.C. tentativeness. The BBC's lede, for example:

White people of European descent will no longer make up a majority of the US population by the year 2042 - eight years sooner than previous estimates.

The big change is among Hispanics and Asians whose share of the population is set to double to 30% and 9%.

The Times more subtly emits a red-alert tone:

“No other country has experienced such rapid racial and ethnic change,” said Mark Mather, a demographer with the Population Reference Bureau, a research organization in Washington.

Unless you're talking about the Cherokee Nation. In that previous monumental conflict in Georgia (even before Sherman's march), Andrew Jackson ethnically cleansed the Cherokees, herding them to the Ozarks along the Trail of Tears and replacing them with slaves and ballcap-wearing, NASCAR-loving rednecks.

Anyway, the Times just loves trend stories, and here's a trend in the Times itself: Just last week (as I noted on August 7), the paper blared "'Minorities Often a Majority of the Population Under 20' "

Next topic for the Times: How do we protect the Upper West Side from these Visigoths?


Human Rights Watch: 'High Toll from Attacks on Populated Areas'

Yes, NYC-based Human Rights Watch has an open bias as a Goody Two-Shoes, but also does some great reporting — unlike its better-known but stodgy fellow NGO Amnesty International — so why not include it in "the press"?

Mainstream international papers, like the Guardian (U.K.), have no problem giving HRW full credit when it breaks news stories. This morning the Guardian's Mark Tran notes:

Human Rights Watch provides the first independent confirmation that Georgian villages in South Ossetia have been looted and burned.

HRW is somewhat schizoid as a news source, because it always follows its great nuggets of news with predictable appeals to officials to stop the madness. For example, today it reports:

Forces on both sides in the conflict between Georgia and Russia appear to have killed and injured civilians through indiscriminate attacks, respectively, on the towns of Gori and Tskhinvali, Human Rights Watch said today. Human Rights Watch expressed its deep concern over the apparently indiscriminate nature of the attacks that have taken such a toll on civilians.

Memo to HRW: Lose the second sentence, please, because your news reporting speaks for itself and you're clouding the impact of that reporting with that squishy, predictable statement of "deep concern." (I guess HRW feels it has to do that, but I ignore such statements of concern — who could disagree with such sentiments? — and take its reporting seriously. Keep reading this item and you'll see why.)

U.S. papers refuse to include HRW and like groups in their press club, but the Internet dissolves that separation because HRW's reports are as freely and directly available as news from other sources.

You may have forgotten — and the mainstream press has done nothing to help you remember — that HRW broke one of the most grim and explosive stories (so far) from the Iraq War.

Back in September 2005, HRW revealed that U.S. troops at Camp Mercury, outside Fallujah, proudly called themselves "Murderous Maniacs" as they tortured and beat up hapless Iraqi prisoners merely for sport — and in a highly sexualized way that was worse than at Abu Ghraib. As I wrote back then:

In a shocking new report, soldiers of the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne reveal that they or their fellow soldiers routinely beat, tortured, stripped, humiliated, and starved Iraqi prisoners in 2003 and 2004 at a base near Fallujah, often breaking bones, either at the request of superiors or just to let off steam.

HRW wasn't guessing, nor was it chiding from its Fifth Avenue offices. It waded right in and talked to U.S. troops about it. From its own report, "Leadership Failure: Firsthand Accounts of Torture of Iraqi Detainees by the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division":

The accounts here suggest that the mistreatment of prisoners by the U.S. military is even more widespread than has been acknowledged to date, including among troops belonging to some of the best trained, most decorated, and highly respected units in the U.S. Army. They describe in vivid terms abusive interrogation techniques ordered by Military Intelligence personnel and known to superior officers. . . .

The torture of detainees reportedly was so widespread and accepted that it became a means of stress relief for soldiers.

Soldiers said they felt welcome to come to the PUC [Prisoner Under Control] tent on their off-hours to "Fuck a PUC" or "Smoke a PUC." "Fucking a PUC" referred to beating a detainee, while "Smoking a PUC" referred to forced physical exertion sometimes to the point of unconsciousness.

Three years later, HRW has made its own march into Georgia. So keep tabs on its reporting. For that matter, keep checking the Guardian's Georgia page.


NY Observer: 'Penguin Group Wins Rights to Steinbeck Novels'

Minor note on a major author, especially compared with Tony Ortega's unique yarn about Steinbeck and Mexican-American farmworkers in today's Voice: "John Steinbeck's Ghosts."


Times: 'Ruling Is a Victory for Supporters of Free Software'

John Markoff's piece about a court ruling in favor of open-source software is a little confusing, but the upshot is that a major pothole has been patched on our major transportation artery, the information highway.


Times: 'Conflict Narrows Oil Options for West'

In other transportation news: Good piece by Jad Mouawad about our latest loss in the centuries-old Great Game in Central Asia, and bad news for us SUV owners:

[E]nergy experts say that the hostilities between Russia and Georgia could threaten American plans to gain access to more of Central Asia’s energy resources at a time when booming demand in Asia and tight supplies helped push the price of oil to record highs.


Times: 'Downtowns Across the U.S. See Streetcars in Their Future'

Yet another transportation story.

Unfortunately, the Times blows this story by just briefly noting that cities and even small towns across the country had functioning streetcar lines until the mid 1950s, and not mentioning at all that it was the automobile lobby that killed them as it pressured pols to build the Interstate Highway System.

I don't blanch at this new development because when I was a kid in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, I depended on the kindness of streetcars. Public transit is a blessing, no matter how much my fellow straphangers grouse about the MTA and Long Island Rail Road.


Post: 'BIZMAN HAD A "LOT" OF NERVE'

Carolyn Salazar's lede is right to the point:

An enterprising squatter transformed a vacant Brooklyn lot into a thriving million-dollar business — an illegal parking lot and chop shop, prosecutors said yesterday.

Whereas powerful pol Shelly Silver is squatting like Jabba the Hutt on a vacant lot on the Lower East Side, as the Voice's Tom Robbins reports.


Daily News: 'Gloomy Gotti trip to Sunshine State'

The latest installment of news about the fading Italian-American Gangster Era. John Marzulli reports:

Junior is on the move. John A. (Junior) Gotti, aka Bureau of Prisons inmate 00632-748, began his journey to Tampa Wednesday to be arraigned on racketeering and murder charges.

Who gives a shit?


Daily News: 'Elizabeth Edwards stayed with cheating husband John for children's sake'

A perfect example of how the Daily News almost always lags behind the Post in tabloidian terms. The lede:

An anguished Elizabeth Edwards decided to stay with her cheating husband because she is dying and worried about their two young children, her closest friend says.

Only five tabloidian buzzers: "anguished," "cheating," "dying, "worried," and "closest friend." Yesterday, I noted eight in a Post Edwards lede.

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