Most New Yorkers Like Bike Lanes, But Does Anyone Use Them?

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Despite some very bitter and ugly public battles, a majority of New Yorkers approve of bike lanes, according to a poll released this week. The Quinnipiac University poll found that 56 percent of city voters say bike lanes "are good because it's greener and healthier for people to ride." The biggest bike lane supporters are in Manhattan, with approval ranging from 62 to 35 percent. Only in Staten Island do voters demonize bikers, with up to 54 percent of voters agreeing that "the lanes are bad because it leaves less room for cars which increases traffic."

That doesn't bode well for bike-friendly Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan's plan to continue building a bike lane and greenway around the South and West Shores of Staten Island. In fact, some of the biggest political opposition to bike lanes has come from Staten Island pols, such as Councilman James Oddo, who successfully lobbied to kill the bike lane of the borough's Father Capodanno Boulevard last year.

Even though the city points to studies that say more people are biking than ever before (Check out the city's neat Sustainable Streets Index), New Yorkers told Quinnipiac that they just don't see that many cyclists around town. Almost half of city votes think bike lanes are not widely used, and 26 percent don't know if people use them.

Perhaps to curb criticism that she was biased toward bikers, Sadik-Khan's crew at the Transportation Department has recently created a series of "Don't be a Jerk" YouTube videos, in which celebs like chef Mario Batali gently scold cyclists for not following basic traffic rules (and for scaring the heck out of drivers).


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7 comments
emrickenoch
emrickenoch

Beach cruiser prices have escalated to an outrageous price these last few years and together the founders realized there had to be a way to make things more affordable.bike basket

emrickenoch
emrickenoch

Please note that your cruiser will not be apt to rust unless exposed to moisture for long periods of time.bike seats 

emrickenoch
emrickenoch

Looks aren't the only thing this cruiser has though. It wouldn't be a sixthreezero without the smooth cruise configuration, so you know it will not only look great, but it'll give yopu the smoothest and easiest ride possible California Bikes.beach bike 

Emrickenoch
Emrickenoch

This is a good idea that should be applied. It is often the same in many cities around the world. 

Pedal Pusher
Pedal Pusher

Communities only hurt themselves by opposing bike lanes. I ride around 50 miles every week commuting and exploring. Every exploratory ride I take is started by consulting Google Maps to see what neighborhoods have bike lanes. On those rides, I spend money at bodegas and restaurants and make notes of places to come back to. I also bring friends along!

In addition, it doesn't surprise me that New Yorkers would say they don't see many cyclists because most NYCers travel via subway. Head to the bike path by the West Side Highway and you will see plenty of bikers. We are here and we aren't going anywhere, so cyclophobic politicians need to stop fighting it!

A1773921
A1773921

I can't think of the last time I walked down a street and didn't see at least one bike, if not many. And that includes walking through the clusterfuck of trailers at the MIB3 campsite. True, a lot of them don't use the bike lanes, but when you consider the number of people walking in them, parking in them, biking the wrong way in them (I'm a cyclist...please stop biking the wrong way in the bike lane...), the bike lanes that were places in the pot-hole/man-hole/random-other-hole prone part of the street while the car area is freshly repaved, or the one on Lafayette where they built a construction area over the bike lane and didn't re-route it, it's not to surprising to see bikers in the street.

James Donohue
James Donohue

I live in Nassau county, but I have recently taken some bike rides on City Bike Lanes. 75th Avenue in Queens is a good example of a Bike Lane. Then there are Bike Paths in the parks, and a Bike Path links Alley Pond Park with Cunningham Park. There always seems to be a gap where Bike Lanes don't connect, and the cyclist is left to his own devices. A vote against Bike Lanes is a vote for Road Rage.

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