'Inside Scientology' Promises a Lot, And Delivers: David Miscavige Has Much to Worry About

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Next month, Janet Reitman's book Inside Scientology will hit bookshelves, and the world of Scientology-watching, and for Scientology itself, will never be the same.

Subtitled The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion, Reitman's book delivers all it promises, and it promises a lot.

"It has been my goal to write the first objective modern history of the Church of Scientology," Reitman proclaims in her introduction. "It is the goal of Inside Scientology to translate [L. Ron Hubbard's arcane] language and separate myth from fact."

That's a big project. And by the end of its 369 pages, you should be convinced that Reitman has not only made good on her goals, but has put together the most masterfully written, narratively rewarding, and thorough yarn about L. Ron Hubbard, David Miscavige, and Scientology and its strange past, present, and possible future.

JanetReitman.jpg
Janet Reitman
Having said that, this longtime Scientology-watcher must admit to some early misgivings with Ms. Reitman's hefty book. Just a few pages after promising to deliver so much, on page 3 of the advance copy Reitman got the year of L. Ron Hubbard's death wrong. (I was promised a final copy of the book, and chances are this error will be fixed.) And in the ensuing pages of Hubbard's early history, there were several glaring omissions that had me worried about her approach. How, I wondered, do you mention Hubbard's college career without pointing out that the self-proclaimed "nuclear physicist" had failed the only class in nuclear physics that he attempted? How also do you spend several pages recounting the infamous occult collaboration between Hubbard and Cal Tech rocket scientist Jack Parsons and leave out the best part, their kinky attempt to create a "moonchild?"

Gradually, however, it became clear that what Reitman had chosen to put in her book was building to the best overall narrative about Hubbard and his creation since such early pioneers as Russell Miller (Barefaced Messiah) and, in particular, Jon Atack's masterful account of the church's early years, A Piece of Blue Sky. Both books, especially Atack's, are not easy to find. Reitman's will be in bookstores all over the country.

That should present a serious problem for Scientology's current dictator, David Miscavige. He does not come off well in this book at all.

If Hubbard's final years turned him into a pathetic, secretive, paranoid germophobe who resembled an end-stage Howard Hughes, the science fiction writer was at least worldly enough to know how to bend his own rules rather than alienate loyal followers. Miscavige, on the other hand, comes off as a case of arrested development who is so dictatorial and unwavering, he's scared off legions of followers in what Reitman calls a "mass exodus."

Along the way, Reitman revisits many of the familiar milestones of Scientology's history, but has done such a good job with original research and interviewing eyewitnesses from every era of the organization's development that she can weave a page-turning narrative no matter how arcane the material.

Using the personal stories of recent defectors such as Jeff Hawkins, Marc Headley and his wife Claire -- all familiar to Voice readers -- and many others, older periods of the church's evolution are made new and exciting. Hawkins, for example. provides the personal touch that helps explain how Hubbard moved the central hub of his creation from a large manor in England to a ship that plied the Mediterranean and the Caribbean, and finally ended up taking over a town in Florida.

For me, the book really kicked into high gear with Reitman's thorough and gripping tale about how David Miscavige emerged as a gung-ho young member of the Sea Org and then engineered his way to the highest levels of the church, ultimately toppling Pat Broeker as Hubbard's assumed successor after Hubbard's death in 1986. I've never seen this history told so well and with such authority.

Equally brilliant, Reitman chooses to tell the next phase of Scientology's history through the eyes of Lisa McPherson.



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110 comments
subgenius
subgenius

It appears Natalie was arrested for DUI in April of 2010. Scientology works and it helps people. Oh, wait what.

Thesysdude
Thesysdude

Well, very interesting reading all these posts. Some areinsightful, some are not, and some are knee-jerk reactions that show noknowledge of the subject matter at all.

As for myself, I got involved with Scientology in 1982. Iended up on staff in a Class V organization for all of about 8 months when Idecided something wasn't "quite right" - I couldn't put my finger onit at the time, but I had an uneasy feeling anyways and left. As it turned out,my gut was right - the shit hit the fan all over the place, from small missionsall the way up to International level. Those that were around at that timewould remember David Mayo getting declared - he was the Senior Case SupervisorInternational. This was a guy who had audited Hubbard himself, and HE gotdeclared! I don't know all the gory details of who got axed, but I do know alot of changes were made. I was "offlines" until 1986 when the shithit the fan again, this time in Portland - anyone remember that? I went backinto the org, and, I was on staff until 1995, working in the Technical Divisionas an Academy Supervisor. I had done auditor training up through Level III, andas a staff member, had done my admin training through to OEC Volume Zero,although I was working on my OEC Volume 4 (Technical Division), when mycontract expired. So I can safely say I do know something about the subject!

In 2005, I went to Los Angeles to get my CCRD (ClearCertainty Rundown).

After spending 4 weeks at the American Saint HillOrganization (ASHO), I had had enough and went home. Why? Because the Directorof Processing couldn't get her shit together enough to ensure I was gettingwhat I paid for, including the CCRD. Did anyone help me to resolve thiscock-up? What do you think? Even my local org left me high and dry.

If there was any one thing that decided for me that as anorganization Scientology was going to the dogs, it was that. So, I've been"offlines" since 2005, and it's highly unlikely that I'll ever goback until David Miscavige and his entire ilk are gone. As far as I amconcerned, David Miscavige is 100% responsible for the mess Scientology is in,and a total reorganization is needed to get things back in shape.

Does this mean I'm pro or anti-Scientology? Not necessarily.  I am somewhat trained both technically andadministratively. I can safely say what I do know of Scientology does work, butI cannot in good conscience support what I consider a failed organization.There are far too many staff that, while they may think they are doing theright thing, are in actual fact contributing to the mess by accepting andacting on “verbal data”, because they have not gone through enough training toknow the difference, and I have experienced too many instances of both org andSea Org staff displaying their ignorance of their own jobs.

Anyways, there’s my two cents worth, for whatever it may beworth.

Gary
Gary

Tony, you wrote "Equally brilliant, Reitman chooses to tell the next phase of Scientology's history through the eyes of Lisa McPherson." Are you kidding? Lisa McPherson was PSYCHOTIC (I knew her personally and can attest to it). Just look at the insane look in her eyes in the picture on here. LOL! 

MarkStark
MarkStark

I like this punchy segment from the Kirkus Book Review:

Reitman delves into the pop-psychology, positive-thinking origins of the cult in the early ’50s in the mind of science-fiction hack, truth-bender and would-be commodore of the planet L. Ron Hubbard. A complex, Ponzi-like structure of franchises and a catechism called the Bridge to Total Freedom requiring steep payment from pilgrims at every point along the way resulted in rapid financial growth. As the cult grew in size, its founder took to the sea, creating a society resembling a sci-fi dystopia, designed both to exalt himself and evade tax laws on the land. After Hubbard died an isolated and paranoid hermit, a young man named David Miscavige muscled his way to the top with the blunt aplomb of a Stalinist apparatchik, punctuating his ascendancy with consequent purges of perceived rivals. 

1abqdad
1abqdad

My background is in engineering research.  [I have 3 engineering degrees (ME/NE) including Stanford Grad school.  I graduated top in my class every time.] I became associated with Scientology when I was doing some research in So Cal and ran into some "celebs" who were deeply involved.  Their motivation was to get a "world class" scientist to validate their pseudo-science.  (They were convinced that Hubbard's toys were actually functional!)  They brought me some of his toys and books and assumed that they would get my approval with flying colors;  Nothing could be further from the truth.  First of all, Hubbard is the most dangerous type of pseudo-scientist.  He has just enough knowledge (And enough ability as a con man) to be dangerous!  Their famous "e meter" is actually what we would refer to as a "Voltmeter"; the "heart" of which is a simple galvanometer, which measures electric fields.  (An electric field in the presence of a magnetic field produces a force which moves the needle.  So, the e meter simply measures either small emf's, or voltages, or resistance depending upon the setting.)  Well, the surface of the body has varying emf's depending upon many factors including body chemistry, body chemicals (Cleaning, moisturizing, perfume, etc.), clothing, and climatic conditions.  So, their "e mater" is actually evaluating these random factors and has nothing to do with ones emotions, Karma, or whatever they claim it to be!  The existence of certain electronic devices can have a tremendous effect on the e meter!  Take in something with a HV transformer, and you can drive it wild!  (We were able to drive it crazy using a 9V battery and switching transistor!)  As a REAL engineer/scientist, I can assure you that ALL of the pseudo-science of Hubbard is pure nonsense!  There is NOT ONE ounce of credibility to their claims!  Sadly, they have been informed of their fraud by myself and others.  They claim to be "Checking it out", but that was 20 years ago, and I have never gotten a response to my conclusions.  (I am sure that it will come as a surprise, but after getting my report, my Scientology pals were no longer "pals"!)

Concerning the money...I understand that the e meters, which members are supposed to buy at least two, cost $5,000+!  Well, I would love to get in on that business because a galvanometer costs less than $10 retail!  (Some are as little as $2 at Harbor Freight!)   Somebody is making a huge amount of money!!!  The bottom line is that Hubbard was a Sci Fi writer and learned how to use his con man skills to defraud people of their money!  The Scheme became more and more sophisticated as his bank account increased!  He just make it up as he went...kind of like creating sequels to a successful movie/story!  Sadly, he has destroyed countless lives as his greed became incresingly destructive/violent/evil!  At the end, he would do anything to protect his greedy empire!  (Dare I say organized crime family?)  I think that the mob would be in awe of his organization and their scare tactics!  Thankfully, there are honest, caring people that are willing to fight back and protect the vulnerable.  I just wonder if/when the media will ever garner the guts to reveal the horrible truth (And lies) that are associated with Scientology... (Movie time?)

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

Thanks for the heads up on this book. Having finished reading it, I must agree with you, that it's an excellent book and delivers!

Eric
Eric

The Church of Scientology is and remains a cult and there's no no two ways about it it. I haven't read Reitman's book yet, so I can't comment on its merits. But I shall read it in due course. As I do for every availablel literature on Scientology.

For those apologists out there,  and for the Scientologists posting comments on Tony Ortega's review here, I can only say this: There is no need for Mr Ortega to invite Scientologists to talk to him, the evidence stands quite clearly by itself.

Just consider, the adverse criticism is overwhelming. I'll cite a few available on the net if you just google around:

Russell Miller's Bare-Faced Messiah, Robert Kaufmannn's Inside Scientology; The Fable - Hollywood, Satanism, Scientology and Suicide; the writings of Stephen A. Kent, Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alberta; Secrets of Scientology pages by Dr David S Touretzky, Research Professor in the Computer Science Department and the Center for Neural Basis of Corgnition at Carnegie Mellon University (now, he is someone whom Scientology has unsuccessfully tried to shut up for ages);Laura Kay Fuller's essay, Scientology & Totalitarianism 1999;Ursula Caberta's Schwartzbuch Scientology;and to me the definitive treatise on Scientology, as well as the most condemning, dating from 2008: Frank Nordhausen & Liane von Billerbeck - Scientology - Wie der Sektenkonzern die Welt erobern will [roughly translated as "How the Cult Business Wants to Conquer the World] - no English translation so far but who knows...

My message to active Scientologists would be this: We're all mere humans, we all strive for a better world, so please get out of there as soon as you can. Just get up and leave.

 

Thetagal
Thetagal

Don't forget to read Amy Scobee's book, Abuse at the Top.  Somehow she missed making the list above, but her story is engaging, well-written and truthful.  Search out scobee publishing and you can find where to purchase.You can't help but love Scientologists...they a talented, resourceful and have excellent communication skills.  Amy started with the Church of Scientology when she was still a teanager, but her book shows a mastery of writing skills and clear presentation.

nate nielsen
nate nielsen

"A piece of blue sky" can be easily found in full text online. The articlse states it is "not easy to find" and it has been available in full, online for years. Check it out.  http://www.apologeticsindex.or...

Mike
Mike

I've been hearing this crap for 10 years.  It appears to be the same ol' re-hash.  Haven't read the book and neither have 99% of you guys posting.  Any criminal activity would have come out during the Headley cases or would have been found by the 14 year, recently disbanded German Comission expressly formed to ban Scientology.  Nothing was found.  Nothing will be found (Funny, Ortega didn't do an article on the German Commission or the Headley rulings, that i am aware of, but he was quick to publish the Eastgate witch-hunt).  Now I am sure the Scientology is not perfect and I am sure that the occasional human foilble will occur and I am sure that some Scientologists do commit crimes --  but the Church is NOT a criminal organization.  There is just nothing out there to justify that type of classification, especially when you consider that the church has been investigated by the IRS, the FBI, various international court investigators and the aforementioned failed German Commission.  I am sure all of these august bodies have the same internet access as Tony Ortega and his gang.  I am sure that they have professional investigators that have experiencing solving crimes and investigating actual criminal enterprises.  I am not OSA and I am not a troll.

Dora N.
Dora N.

Tony, once again thank you for your brave and continuous coverage of this dangerous organization.  

Roberto
Roberto

Thanks once again Tony. I look forward to the book.

sizzle8
sizzle8

"Both books, especially Atack's, are not easy to find."Au contraire.  Just Google.  Downloadable versions are just a click away.

Fredric L. Rice
Fredric L. Rice

The irony is that the book is a bit out of date already. The Scientology crime boss in Australia who wanted to pretend she was the leader of the fake "human rights" fraud CCHR was indicted on accessory to rape of a minor. That won't be covered in the book and a great many other indictments and racketeering crimes against society will have been missed simply due to the time it takes to publish.

mirele
mirele

Tony,  thanks for this excellent review. It swayed me towards buying a hard copy of the book (supposedly I'll get it on Friday). I'm going to call it an early birthday present.

Untasered
Untasered

Judging solely by Reitman's earlier, clearly anti-Scientology, article, we can't call her a journalist.

To date, she has served more as an apologist for Scientology haters, and an opportunist upon their eagerness to buy and read whatever echoes their order of service.Journalists start with an open mind. They examine all sides even if it rankles.They report all sides even-handedly.They avoid emotionally charged words.They present the pros and cons with equal fervor, or lack thereof. You find in their writings positives and negatives. All sides get fair treatment in the title/headlineAll sides get equal "paragraph rank" in the article or chapters. To date (I repeat), Ms. Reitman can claim none of those characteristics in her earlier article. Judging by the vaguely insulting title of her imminent book, I conclude--even though she was insufficiently vicious for The Voice--that most of the above criteria will yet remain unsatisfied.Perhaps, someday, a book about Scientology will surprise us. 

Douwe Beerda
Douwe Beerda

It sounds interesting. Will it be just about the organisation though or will they also go into Scientology scripture and their technology? Because that is the reason most people have an interest in it. The 8 Dynamics of Survival. The ARC triangle and the KRC triangle, etc. Is she talking about the human betterment programs Scientology has helped set up such as http://www.humanrights.comhttp://www.thewaytohappiness.o... & http://www.drugfreeworld.org ? 

I`m asking because i myself have had and continue to have an interest in the religion. Not so much in the organisation but mostly in the scripture. If this book is only about debunking the organization and listing their wrongdoings, then I think it is a bit of an easy shot. It might be nice if people would write a similar book about christianity and islam over the past 60 years. Most people are very critical on scientology but don`t dare to stand up against these bigger religions that have been around a lot longer already. How about the sexual abuse of members of the catholic church all over the world. Or about the treatment of women and the hanging of gay people in name of Islam? But that takes courage doesn`t it. It seems to be easier to pick on the new religion on the block. Hell even budhism should have some dirt over the past 60 years if you look into it. I`m not trying to deny the wrongdoings and the mistakes of the organisation SCT but it will not explain why Scientology has actually managed to become the newest worldwide religion on this planet. I now it is easy to pick on the new kid but it might be a bit to onesided if you only do that.  

Pooch Bowen
Pooch Bowen

"... but has put together the most masterfully written, narratively rewarding, and thorough yarn about L. Ron Hubbard ..."

perhaps "yarn" wasn't your best choice of words to use to describe this piece of work, but if it was then i'll be spending my money elsewhere; i don't need to spend it on tall tales.

Gary Lee-Nova
Gary Lee-Nova

Good going, Gary. You are shoring up the reputation of your bogus "church" with more of the "Blame The Victim" tactic. 

Every time someone from $cientology tries to excuse the cult for a hideous crime by blaming the victim, it makes the cult appear even more ridiculous. 

Protip: "ridiculous" is a bottomless pit. One can never appear too ridiculous.

I find it startling to realize how distorted your mind has become, how delusional your thinking has become, and how completely you fail to understand this. 

Those who blame victims are those who appear to be retarded. 

You appear to be extremely retarded and a very failed human being.

1abqdad
1abqdad

Mike - You could NOT be more wrong!  The pseudo-church has pulled every dirty trick in the book; including bugging the offices of the IRS, harassing IRS employees all the way to the top (Commissioner), stealing IRS documents, threatening IRS investigators and their families, etc.  I DO believe that these actions are criminal, but we all know that if you have enough money you can get away with murder!  They even record the "auditing" sessions to use against anyone who tries to leave!  (WITHOUT your knowledge - They have a recording of your darkest secrets and threaten to use them if you leave!)  This is a powerful, wealthy, evil organization!!!  Sadly, they have the influence and more importantly, the willingness to violate the law and destroy lives to maintain their evil empire!  I spoke with the "Captain" of their ship in 1990 while flying 1st class (Tampa-St Louis on TWA), and he was obviously VERY uncomfortable about things that were happening on the ship!   I think that he was close to deciding to leave the organization but was literally concerned for his LIFE if he left!  He believed that he would be killed if he revealed what he knew!  Look, the mobs have survived for decades without prosecution because money talks in this country!  (It can buy you the ability to violate laws and destroy lives if you have the lack of morals and have a willingness to preform the evil acts that are required...and these criminals have clearly demonstrated their willingness to do just that!!!)  This captain was literally in fear for his life...and for good reason!  To naively assume that the justice system or other government organizations can stop powerful/evil people is sheer folly!  If a person has the resources and is willing to threaten a government worker's family, they can get away with anything.  Scientology proved this by wearing down the IRS, and the public pays for that evil every day!

Sid
Sid

Mike

I believe you when you say you are not OSA and not a troll, because your post is very different from the usual OSA/troll postings. I'm sorry if people react to you badly when you post pro-Scientology messages, it's just that most people don't encounter "public" Scientologists on the Internet - it IS usually OSA.

I think you might want to think about why that is Mike? Why are Scientologists not allowed to view critical web sites or articles? Also, why does a religion have a department whose job it is to visit critical web sites and try and change the discussion or slur the source of the information?

You said you "haven't read the book and 99% of us have not either". Will you read the book Mike? Are you allowed to? I'm going to read the book Mike. And I'm a pretty good judge of intent. I will decide for myself whether I believe the author. You could do that too if you wanted to.

I wonder what stories you've been told about the various German investigations into Scientolgoy? Did you know they reported that "there is substantial evidence that the Scientology organization is involved in activities directed against the free democratic order" amongst many other findings? Scientology is monitored very closely in Germany Mike. Most democratic nations around the world have refused to award Scientology religious status. The US is one of the few countries that have.

Regarding the FBI, I suggest you wait and see.

With regard to bringing the organization of the CoS to justice it is very difficult. You must be aware of the fear that Scientologists have of leaving Scientology and speaking out. You must know of disconnection, and you MAY know about the "fair game" policies which are still active. You must also know the fear of being declared an SP.

Scientologists are in a difficult position in terms of reporting abuse WHILST they are in the Church. They are told the "wog" world is hostile, they are told they will lose their eternity, they know they face disconnection and possibly being declared. They are told to stick with Scn justice, not "wog" justice.

When they leave, most Scientologists stay under the radar whilst they decompress, and by the time they are ready to talk, it's usually quite some time after the incidents. Also, they know that if the police turn up to question anybody, they will have a hard time getting anybody to corroborate their evidence for the above reasons.

Did you know Mike that well over one thousand ex-Scientologists have now spoken out about the abuses and crimes they witnessed? If you do a search for "big list of exes" you will find this list, and links to each of their stories. Read those stories Mike, and then come back and tell me that this is all crap.

Joe Lynn
Joe Lynn

The biggest mistake the FBI made in 1977 was to *stop* digging following the raids that revealed the underpinnings of Operations 'Snow White' and 'Freakout' etc.   Then, as now, Scientology blamed 'rogue agents', 'infiltrators' etc. for the deliberate actions of a criminal organization operating on orders from L. Ron Hubbard himself.

That mistake cannot be allowed to happen again.  Now, more than any time since the 'founding' of Scientology in the '50s there is enough information and public awareness to support a *full* investigation of Scientology as a criminal conspiracy, because, the criminality of the Scientology 'Church' is the program of the 'Church' as laid out by L. Ron Hubbard himself.

Guest
Guest

"I am not OSA "

 Oh well, we almost believed you.

William Burke
William Burke

"recently disbanded German Comission expressly formed to ban Scientology.  Nothing was found."

LOL! You continue to try to convince yourself that "nothing was found".  What a laugh!  The German Commission found that the Church of Scientology was "ANTI-CONSTITUTIONAL" but was TOO SMALL to be a threat.  Yes, Scientology wants to destroy the German constitution and replace it with Scientology's own totalitarian rule, but is too small and weak to accomplish it.  So it IS under surveillance to ensure it never has a chance.

"Nothing was found"!  No, Mike.  A lot was found.  What you mean is "nothing was DONE" because your tiny, failing "church" is too small.

EyesOnYou
EyesOnYou

Just as major corporations have their $1000 an hour lawyers cleaning up and/or hiding their crimes, Scientology has bought and lawyered its way out of their own. In addition they have hired spies, intimidators and other trash to do their dirty work. Don't be so frapping naive, you're skimming along the surface. Get into the water and do some in depth research. And if you're not OSA or a troll, you will soon be recruited.

PamEllis
PamEllis

Yeah, if one is looking for Piece of Blue Sky...it is easy to find online and for free.

But a few books sitting in a library or bookstore might get views from people who didn't even know the book existed.

TonyOrtega
TonyOrtega

Well, now, this book goes from Hubbard's birth to events in 2010. Saying it doesn't have news from a few weeks ago is being a bit unfair, don't you think?

mirele
mirele

Fred, think  of it this way:  there'll be stuff for Reitman to put in an update for the paperback version in a year!

Beadweaver
Beadweaver

Please tell me - Why does the CO$ use the Christian Cross in its icon?  There is no correlation between the two.  This is very misleading.  Christians worship Jesus, hence the cross.  What do you Scilons worship?  Yourselves?  Please remove the Cross from your misleading org, it's insulting to genuine religions.

LIGHT
LIGHT

Reitman spent five years researching this book.  She was allowed unprecedented access to Scientology, by SCIENTOLOGISTS.  She reported ALL sides even-handedly.This book about Scientology will surprise YOU, if you're ALLOWED to read it.

And when you read it, you will leave Scientology.  And when you leave, you will find people on the other side- MILLIONS OF THEM- who will support your exodus and welcome you with LOVE.

Sid
Sid

I also think the Nazis have had a rum deal from the journalistic community.

Sure, they carried out the Holocaust.

Sure, they dragged most countries in the world into a global conflict which resulted in the deaths of 50 million+ people.

BUT, everyone always forgets the roads! The German road network was rubbish until the Nazis swept to power and built all the autobahns.

Everyone forgets that.

EyesOnYou
EyesOnYou

UntaseredJust like the "journalism" of the current issue of Freedom Magazine??? The hypocrisy oozes from your post

PamEllis
PamEllis

Can you print out or post a link to something Janet Reitman was incorrect about, or left out information regarding scientology?

Let me know when this book about scientology that you think will be truly fair comes out. One that examines ALL sides as you say.  Yet one you appear to think will still show scientology in a positive light.

janedarby
janedarby

Scientology rally cry "shoot the messenger" unless its Hubbard

sizzle8
sizzle8

In the face of overwhelming first hand evidence, when will Scientologists realize that their problems are internally created.

Guest
Guest

 Hi OSA "internet handler"! Why didn't you post as journalist in your post here like you were doing on those SP Times articles a few months back? Someone might have believed you, you OSA dudes really suck at guerilla marketing but someone might have bought it.

Fredric L. Rice
Fredric L. Rice

And by "anti-Scientology" this Scientology crook means "anti-organized crime."

If these insane flying saucer criminals would rook and swindle money from their idiot followers and refrain from committing kidnappings, murder, black mail, extortion, espionage, and other RICO Predicate Acts against countries, the frothingly insane criminal cult would be ignored. Nobody would give a damn about the insane cult.

The fact that Scientology is organized crime and constitutes a fascist treason entity in every country the crime syndicate is still allowed to operate in is why exposing the crime syndicate is a Very Good Thing.

MarkStark
MarkStark

Maybe you should get Xenu to write a book. According to Hubbard, he's still in his mountain prison, held captive by an electro-magnetic force field. He's been there for 75 million years so by now he must have a lot of "cognitions" to write down. How about a little cred for Xenu?

Besides, all reporters are wogs and "merchants of chaos." The official cult version of Hubbard's life got canceled years ago because something called the truth and facts got in the way. There just wasn't any documentation for a credible Hubbugary to be cu-published.

Dianutty sold big sixty odd years ago. Now it is Janet's turn at writing a best seller. Why can't you be more supportive of talented writers? Janet has a Master's degree from Columbia U's School of Journalism. Do you think she'd be more of a writer if she flunked out of school like Hubbard, or dropped out of high school like Miscavige or claimed she's done a lot of out-of-body travel to Venus and Mars? Does she have to say she's from Jupiter to get your attention?

Kanonimus1
Kanonimus1

I believe that if you actually read the book, you will be surprised.

TonyOrtega
TonyOrtega

I know this is just a troll, but I will take the time to explain my use of the word "yarn."

In magazine (and book) journalism, a reporter might spent months, even years, doing the difficult work of digging up information and interviewing people -- resulting in a mountain of information. Then begins an entirely different process: turning all that information into a readable narrative. When a magazine journalist really nails it, his or her story is such a pleasure to read, you don't even notice that you're absorbing huge amounts of hard information. When that happens, among the magazine journalists I've known and admired, we pay that person the ultimate compliment: they've turned a mountain of data into a great yarn. Honestly, I know no higher praise among the journalists I know.

Does that help explain my use of the word?

Guest
Guest

We KNOW where you'll be spending your money!  As a scientologist, you have to pay to pray.  Most people get to do that for free.

Pooch Bowen
Pooch Bowen

you guys are too funny.  do you assume anyone critical of this review or of this book is a scientologist?  i loathe all cults, er, religions, equally.  but i also know that the meaning of the word "yarn" includes "implausible"; maybe the reviewer meant something else? 

Guest
Guest

 Hi OSA, you Scientologists should really read other stuff than L Ron's junk and broaden your mind.

Fredric L. Rice
Fredric L. Rice

Maybe you should crack open your Scientology dictionary and look up the word to clear that MU of yours, Mary.

PamEllis
PamEllis

Then I can assume you will not spend any money towards scientology and xenu tales either.

nate nielsen
nate nielsen

Yes, they are getting weaker by the minute. They pay random people to attend events, as to make attendance seem large. They are buying property but losing victims to extort in the "church" The public is finally learning what an abuive group they are.

I know from personal experience. THey control their clients through guilt, fear, and isolation.

Nathan Nielsen, Portland, OR 

Mike
Mike

Oh so that's how they do it.  For 14 years they managed to obfuscate the German government Commission with spies and intimidators.  The Headley cases were dismissed because they hired $1,000 an hour lawyers -- not because of any legal precedent or lack of evidence.  OK, now, I get it.  Next you're going to tell me they intimidated the IRS the same way!  Wow! They must be a powerful group, well no because: (1) their technology is a scam; (2) they are all liars and cheats; (3) they really only have a few thousand members (that's why they can afford all those high priced lawyers and "intimidators")  ...they go out commit crimes and then throw their money around...that is a great organizational model...I wonder how they have been able to survive for the last 60 years or so....the accusations flying around here really have no basis in logic...you know "eyesonyou" I don't blame you for not knowing about those types of cases since you only read what Ortega wants you to read or you only go to the "ihatescientology" web sites.  There is a whole world out there that, thankfully, actually looks at issues in an objective manner and operates on actual facts and documentation and not induendo, hearsay and out-of-context quotations...that is why the Headley's lost and the German Commission failed.

Sarahj
Sarahj

Ah kids today.  Five minutes is too long right?

Just finished the  book (Kindle App).  Your review, Tony, is right on the money.  Many many movies could be made.  So much coverage, yet it doesn't skip on the sci crazy details, like Miscavige's dog and staff made to salute it.  This is a page turner, which surprised me, but seriously in depth, which I'd expected from this author. And yes,  David Miscavige does have much to worry about. Here's a mild exerpt:

"“DM idolized L. Ron Hubbard, the only boss he'd ever known; but unlike many seasoned Sea Org members who knew the Founder's propensity for changing his mind, Miscavige also took everything that Hubbard said literally. And what Hubbard was saying from his secret location was, by his second year in hiding, increasingly extreme. The Founder had returned to his original love, writing fiction, in seclusion, and was at work on the book that would become his opus: Battlefield Earth.* But he was also convinced that Suppressives had infiltrated the movement, particularly the Guardian's Office, and in missives signed only with an asterisk (in an effort to distance himself from Scientology management, Hubbard had adopted the asterisk as his "signature" on church documents) issued directives for his aides to spit on other staff members, strike those who seemed to oppose his wishes, or even send people to jail. While it would have been an act of sacrilege to disobey L. Ron Hubbard, "some of us would still not do the most awful things Hubbard talked about as they violated our sense of right and wrong just too much," said Brennan. "DM, on the other hand, would blindly, and violently, follow such orders."  from Janet Reitman's "Inside Scientology"    from Janet Reitman's "Inside Scientology"  

Tmb Stuff
Tmb Stuff

Excellent review. I want to read it. I've been there, done that and been down the food chain of the psyco one. We never got the truth! Just the PR BS!

Michael Setzer
Michael Setzer

     @ PamEllis, of course they can't or won't. This isn just a huge portion of Copy Pasta. Remember entheta and all that.

Fredric L. Rice
Fredric L. Rice

Scientology's remaining customers -- all 40,000 of them world wide -- are not allowed to read anything truthful about the criminal enterprise they're working for or giving money to. Can't have the rubes learn about Scientology, that would cause the money to stop flowing.

PamEllis
PamEllis

Most people who post on Tony's blog against scientology criticism or in support of scientology are in fact scientologists, and doing so as part of their job.  (Some might be trolls looking for laughs as well)

Don't over-think the word "yarn".One definition is :"a long and often involved story or account, usually telling of incredible or fantastic events"

When reading about Hubbard and scientology, it is very "incredible and fanatstic" (hard to believe), so the use of yarn is not really a stretch.

I also associate the word yarn with an enjoyable read.

LIGHT
LIGHT

Mike,

You are either stupid or a liar.  Take your pick.This book has been exhaustedly researched.Both sides are presented.If you are allowed to read it, like I am and have, you will clearly have another viewpoint than the ill-informed one you have been spoonfed.And then you will leave the "church."And there will be people on the outside, MILLIONS OF THEM, who will love you, without question, even though you made a horrible choice to join a "religion" that will only continue to brainwash you, take your money, and one day will tell you of YOUR non-existent "CRIMES" and send you to the RPF, where no one will find you.Where's Shelly?

William Burke
William Burke

"The Headley cases were dismissed because they hired $1,000 an hour lawyers -- not because of any legal precedent or lack of evidence.  OK, now, I get it."

No, the Headly cases were dismissed because the Church of Scientology is a cult.  Yes, they admitted IN COURT that they DO abuse their staff, they DO feed them table-scraps, they DO give them only 4 hours of sleep a night, they DO deny them any time off at all.  They admitted this in court, "But", they said, "we can DO that, we're a religious CULT."

And the judge had to agree.  Cults are allowed to abuse their staff.

What they admitted in court is NOT something you should be proud of -- going around bragging that "they got away with it!"

MarcAbian
MarcAbian

Hi there OSA.  How many points did you get for this reply to your message?How many points do you need so that you get to eat food other than rice and beans?How many points do you lose when I mention that Xenu is the cause of all body thetans?How many points do you lose when I mention that the Scientology corporation was convicted of crimes in France?

OSA: you lose.

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