New Yorkers Are Now Experiencing Hurricane Regret

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It seems a particularly New York sort of reaction that, once you get worked up and worried enough about an oncoming storm to stand in line for several hours to buy some white bread and peanut butter and a bulk case of water, you will be, ultimately, disappointed when you don't actually have to use your supplies, or your go-bag, or your exit strategy. Like New Year's Eve or any highly anticipated night out (or in), Hurricane Irene was kind of...a let down. New Yorkers do not like to wait in line for let-downs! Or, as in the title of this New York Times article, "'Some Hurricane,' New Yorkers Grumble as Danger Passes." If we're going to "be in danger," we should be in danger! We paid for it!

Admittedly, this very blogger had been expecting at least some high winds, and a little bit of an actual reason, besides neuroses, to sleep on her couch instead of the bed next to the windows on Saturday night. At the very least, a frisson of horror-movie fear, perhaps, which would somehow be justification for standing in that 40-person-deep bodega line with an armful of Volvic, feeling like an ass. But, in the end, there was not.

Aside from subway and travel complications (and, anecdotally, city subways seem to be moving pretty well, though railways outside the city are still in major clean-up mode), and the flooding, messiness, power outages, and having to see a lot of people in wellies, we seem to be...pretty much...okay. Which is, in the words of some, LAME. Let us throw the blame upon Mayor Bloomberg, who, obviously, simply wanted to make himself look good after the blizzard mess in December/January of this year! We didn't need any of that white bread, after all! (But...did he not sort of, actually, succeed?)

Let's take a few steps back. People have died in this hurricane. While there was only one fatality in the New York City area, there have been a total of 24 people killed in 8 states throughout the U.S. And Irene, now a tropical storm, is still going, causing significant damage in the Catskills and Vermont before continuing on. Some 945,000 people throughout the state still don't have power. At the end of the day, Irene will have messed with a lot of people.

But she has passed our city, leaving us mostly dry and enjoying sunny, abnormally but pleasantly fall-ish weather, yet full of ennui over our lack of a real hurricane. Woe to us! Do New Yorkers not deserve the best in everything, including natural disasters?

But, really, can we just be happy that we're all pretty much okay, hope for the best for people who are still being affected, and wait it out until the next earth-rattling/nature-terrifying moment? Plus, you'll have all that water on hand already.

Fine, let's think of it this way: New York City scared that mother-fucking hurricane into submission.

[JDoll / @thisisjendoll]

Go to Runnin' Scared for all our latest news coverage.

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10 comments
Gary McAleer
Gary McAleer

Good piece by Jen—filled with some practical lessons. First, I'm reminded of the prophet Jonah who warned Nineveh of an imminent destruction; and when the destruction never came, Jonah was fiercely angry. The message of mercy had to cool him off. Then there's the "Cry Wolf" story. Better safe than sorry was the moral of that one. Lastly, I remember the fire drills in elementary school. Those rehearsals prepared us for the real thing should it occur. So with the swelling of uncertainty in every rank of our society, it seems patience in preparedness is the best option.

Cvan
Cvan

C'mon, he was playing CYA after the snowstorm.  It wasn't a hurricane anyway.  The headline should read "Tropical Storm Regret."

penelope83
penelope83

KATRINA....'nuff said.

Cvan
Cvan

Katrina was a Cat 3 Hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico.  The water's too cool up north by NYC for a storm to be that strong and that dangerous.  No comparison.  Sorry, but New Yorkers wimped out, led by the mayor.

Victorherbert
Victorherbert

The anticipation was such that, as I was getting off the train in N.J., I wished someone a "Happy Hurricane". 

bushwick12345
bushwick12345

totally agree. some areas in the city did have notable damage and a lot of areas not even very far from the city (NJ, westchester, long island) had extensive damage. people seem to be thinking that the whole storm was kind of nothing, but it actually really was, even if the evidence of it isn't right outside their bedroom window.

and i totally support your being neurotic and sleeping on the couch. i thought i was being silly moving my bed from in front of the window to a further corner of my room. and then...my ceiling by the window started leaking, so i was glad my silliness paid off. 

janelle
janelle

any new yorker who feels short-changed could volunteer their labor day weekend cleaning up (or some such effort) in NJ, upstate NY or anyplace else that experienced the hard-hitting hurricane they had so desperately wished for. 

Jodee Jingles
Jodee Jingles

ppl should be grateful that this was not a catastrophe and donate the water and food to ppl that lost there homes. OR safe it for this awful winter soon to come.

Libby Segal
Libby Segal

I LOVE THIS. I totally agree with you. we BEAT the hurricane. that's how we should be looking at it. I even commented on it in my own blog where I provide 5 ways to overcome the hurricane disappointment, if you are really truly disappointed: http://libsonthereel.blogspot....    Thanks for honoring honest perspective. It's like Irene blueballed all of New York City--but people it's not THAT bad. Seriously.

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