Scientology Dodges a Bullet in Australia: Church Told to Pay Workers, Says "We'll Get Right On That" (UPDATED)

ScienoAustralia.jpg
UPDATE: After the jump, former Scientology spokesman Mike Rinder reacts to news of the surprising final ombudsman's report.

Scientology watchers in Australia are still absorbing a stunning case of bait-and-switch Down Under.

Earlier this week, a "draft" report by that country's "Fair Work Ombudsman" was leaked which seemed to indicate that Scientology was on the verge of a world of hurt: after interviewing eight witnesses who complained of working long hours for little pay, the labor agency seemed convinced that Scientology is falsely calling employees "volunteers" and might actually be violating the country's anti-slavery laws.

Tonight, however, the "final" report of the Ombudsman was released, and it reads nothing like that earlier draft.

None of the eight witnesses were working for the church recently enough for their claims to matter, and only two of the witnesses were working for other church entities that can be investigated. And even those witnesses, the report says, were working voluntarily.

The document urges Scientology to audit itself and make sure it is paying people properly. Australia's ABC reports that the church, not surprisingly, says it will do so.

It's currently 4 in the morning here in New York, so it will be some time before I can reach Mike Rinder and other sources for reaction to this news.

Online reactions are muted. Members of Anonymous initially greeted the final report with some elation...

Oh. My. God. It is a thing of beauty and freedom and justice.

But as they made their way through the lengthy document, it gradually began to dawn on some that the report was not what they had expected.

This isn't the huge, stake-thro-the-heart-of-the-Beast that we had hoped it would be

No, indeed. It isn't.

The report spends several pages establishing that Scientology's various entities are constitutional corporations under Australian law and are subject to the labor agency's jurisdiction.

But then it goes through the case of each witness, some of whom haven't worked for Scientology since the 1980s. One after another, they are simply dismissed as evidence that is too old to consider.

One witness did work from 1998 to 2008 -- but said that work was voluntary, and the Ombudsman doesn't disagree.

Another witness was only 14 when she signed a billion-year contract and joined the hardcore Sea Org, would work from 9 in the morning until 3 or 4 the next morning, and once worked 72 hours straight -- but still, considered this voluntary work.

All of the tough language of the draft report -- that the Ombudsman didn't buy the church's claims that this work was voluntary, and that anti-slavery laws might be violated -- has been stripped out.

Instead, the report concludes with weak recommendations that Scientology should get its own house in order. With such get-tough sounding headings as, "What the Church of Scientology and workers might do to reduce further complaints," the report goes on to recommend that Scientology hire an auditor.

It would be prudent for the Church of Scientology to proactively undertake this self audit process at the earliest opportunity.

Oh, we're certain David Miscavige will get on that, straight away.


UPDATE: I spoke with Mike Rinder about the surprising final report. He had this to say:

"I believe this is the effort to be abundantly cautious on the part of this Fair Work Ombudsman. Why they changed it so much was that they didn't feel they had a strong case to go with because of the witnesses that were available to them," he said. "And yet, because of the publicity around this investigation, there are a whole lot of other people coming forward now. And they may have the better circumstances the Ombudsman is looking for -- working for the church in the last six years and under certain contracts, etc."

I told Rinder that there were many moments in the document that seemed to hint as much -- that the Ombudsman will be interested in further investigation, but with better witnesses and data.

"I don't view this as the end, not as case closed, but as case opened," Rinder said.

He also pointed out that the disappointing final report won't stop a class action lawsuit, which was announced by an Australian law firm earlier in the week.



The Top 25 People Crippling Scientology
#8: Mike Rinder
#9: Jason Beghe
#10: Lisa McPherson
#11: Nick Xenophon (and other public servants)
#12: Tommy Davis (and other hapless church executives)
#13: Janet Reitman (and other journalists)
#14: Tory Christman (and other noisy ex-Scientologists)
#15: Andreas Heldal-Lund (and other old time church critics)
#16: Marc and Claire Headley, escapees of the church's HQ
#17: Jefferson Hawkins, the man behind the TV volcano
#18: Amy Scobee, former Sea Org executive
#19: The Squirrel Busters (and the church's other thugs and goons)
#20: Trey Parker and Matt Stone (and other media figures)
#21: Kendrick Moxon, attorney for the church
#22: Jamie DeWolf (and other L. Ron Hubbard family members)
#23: Ken Dandar (and other attorneys who litigate against the church)
#24: David Touretzky (and other academics)
#25: Xenu, galactic overlord


tortega@villagevoice.com | @VoiceTonyO | Facebook: Tony Ortega

See all of our recent Scientology coverage at the Voice

Keep up on all of our New York news coverage at this blog, Runnin' Scared

Tony Ortega is the editor-in-chief of The Village Voice. Since 1995, he's been writing about Scientology at several publications. Among his other stories about L. Ron Hubbard's organization:

The Larry Wollersheim Saga -- Scientology Finally Pays For Its Fraud
The Tory Bezazian (Christman) Story -- How the Internet Saved A Scientologist From Herself
The Jason Beghe Defection -- A Scientology Celebrity Goes Rogue
The Robert Cipriano Case -- A Hellacious Example of Fair Game
The Paul Haggis Ultimatum -- The 'Crash' Director Tells Scientology to Shove It
The Marc Headley Escape -- 'Tom Cruise Told Me to Talk to a Bottle'
The Aaron Saxton Accusation -- Australia turns up the heat on Scientology
The Jefferson Hawkins Stipulation -- Scientology's former PR genius comes clean
The Daniel Montalvo Double-Cross -- Scientology lures a young defector into a trap
A Church Myth Debunked -- Scientology and Proposition 8
Daniel Montalvo Strikes Back -- Scientology Hit with Stunning Child-Labor Lawsuits
When Scientologists Attack -- The Marty Rathbun Intimidation
A Scientologist Excommunicated -- The Michael Fairman SP Declaration
The Richard Leiby Operation -- Investigating a reporter's divorce to shut him up
The Hugh Urban Investigation -- An academic takes a harsh look at Scientology's past
Giovanni Ribisi as David Koresh -- A precedent for a Scientology-Branch Davidian link
Janet Reitman's Inside Scientology -- A masterful telling of Scientology's history
The Western Spy Network Revealed? -- Marty Rathbun ups the ante on David Miscavige
Scientology's Enemies List -- Are You On It?
Inside Inside Scientology -- An interview with author Janet Reitman
Scientology and the Nation of Islam -- Holy Doctrinal Mashup, Batman!
Scientologists -- How Many of Them Are There, Anyway?
Roger Weller's Wild Ride -- Scientology When it was Hip
The Marc Headley Infiltration -- A Scientology Spying Operation Revealed
Placido Domingo Jr: Scientology's Retaliation is "Scary and Pathetic"
An Interview with Nancy Many, Former Scientology Spy
The Paulien Lombard Confession -- A Scientology Spy Comes Clean
The Deputy Benjamin Ring Hard Sell -- Scientology wants your 401K
The Top 25 People Crippling Scientology -- the whole series!
The Squirrel Busters Busted -- Unmasking the Scientology PI in Charge
Tommy Davis, Scientology spokesman, secretly recorded discussing 'disconnection'
Scientology internal document says its Office of Special Affairs will 'handle' the Village Voice



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66 comments
Tye Solaris
Tye Solaris

"The Document Urges Scientology to "Audit" itself"....?????

Seriously???

ROFL.... 

Mike
Mike

Also, I think it is interesting that that particular draft report was releashed in light of the pending class action suit (re: money grab).

Mike
Mike

The draft report never should have been released in the 1st place (I wonder why the press don't look into THAT breach of protocol).  There are many, many draft reports and most never get to see the light of day.  Sometimes reports are drafted to show extremes: "you guys take the 'pro'-side and you guys take the 'con'-side" then each report is cultivated into a final report - that way all aspects of the subject matter are being represented. Once again we have an example where accusations, hearsay, he-said-she-said intrigue, etc., make for lively internet forum fodder, but when faced with real world scrutiny fall well short of legitimacy.  Even though most accusations fall beyond the statute of limitations, if there were really serious I doubt that they would leave at "call the police".

Marcotai
Marcotai

The Australian anti religious extremist senator is desperately try to find new apostates for his class action lawsuit because his 8 "witnesses' were found to be unreliable (liars).So far he has recruited NONE and he is trying to find out the whereabouts of his 'pupil" Mr Saxton, the guy who ran away with the senator's and anonymous' donated money.The senator need your help. Could you lie for money? If the answer is yes, please contact him.

Jaymaxx
Jaymaxx

§102.c Witness 7 Evidence:

"documents were signed by Witness 7 [... including] completion  of  a  tax  declaration form."

"promoted to the position of Director of Writing and Personnel"

"would  work  until  3.00am  or  4.00am  to  reach book  sales quotas"

"ability  to  leave  was  limited"

"Work  was  performed seven days each week"

"had no control over the hours they were directed to work"

"uncertain as to whether their status was voluntary or employment"

§102.e (p32) finding:"Based on the evidence disclosed in the course of the investigation the Fair Work Ombudsman has  determined  that,  on  balance,  Witness  7‟s  relationship  with  the Church   of   Scientology   was   voluntary   in   nature,   not   one   of   employment."

WTF?!?!?!?!?! 

Sense this not makes. 

Journalistic questioning called for.

I really try hard to avoid assuming hidden nefariousnesses, even with el Culto; but §102 looks like a Merlion [wiki it]: head and tail jammed together and people are supposed to just accept it as though its not obviously freaky and retarded....

scifibandit
scifibandit

Someone should write an article entitled,"Warning, Scientology Staff Not Entitled to Receive Pay: Sign Up at Your Own Risk"

red_zone
red_zone

Class Action Lawsuit coming up!

Even though it's not the smack-down, drag-em' out report we were all hoping for, it certainly has grabbed public attention.

Xenu
Xenu

This just puts the ball back into Xenophon's court.

No more charitable status, no more "volunteers."

mjm
mjm

Tony, can you possibly interview Senator Xenophon about this?

as for OSA troll Marcotai/Louanne, go back to the RPF hole you crawled from...

Marcotai
Marcotai

"Scientology Dodges a Bullet of Truth and Rationality in Australia: Church Told to Pay Workers, Says "We'll Get Right On That Like We Usually Did"

Senator Xenophon needs to stop "lying  for money"!

KeepOnLearning
KeepOnLearning

READ THIS CAREFULLY to see how the time and resources of the Australian court--and any other court that may accept such complaints--are irresponsibly wasted by any publicity-seekers bringing this or a similar lawsuit: 

* Mr. Hubbard's own writings--a terse, publicly mailed-out, recruitment letter in Hubbard's handwriting--tells applicants to expect "long hours and low pay." Could the Church have been more clear from the outset?

* All applicants were of legal age or had a parent or guardian oversee the process and give their permission. * All complainants read and understood the staff contract. 

* All knew they were signing up for a "life-mission" that required "long hours" and dedication. It was not for-profit employment.

* The view of each person signing the agreements was a true and heartfelt religious commitment at the time of agreement. In their hearts, they were taking religious vows, not a job. This legal principle has held up on other continents.

* Hubbard wrote at least three extremely clear policy letters--which must be studied in the first few  months--stating that individual pay is entirely dependent on organizational income. The percentages are likewise matters of policy all are required to read. 

* If applicants claim they had originally misunderstood the compensation, they yet continued to perform work and receive pay. Their first paychecks showed the pattern of compensation. At that juncture, they could have raised questions or backed out--especially if they were minors. Yet all continued for multiple years. 

This case has always been about a minor Australian politico, Independent Senator Nick Xenophon, trying to eke out donations and publicity. All other claims against the Church in this matter are equally money-motivated and self-serving by those who make them.

Carmen
Carmen

So the government is allowing the fox to continue eating the chickens. Good lard, depending upon this fudgy, slimy, lying entity to provide audits...honestly? REALLY?

Apparently this team learned nothing about the nature of Scientology if they expect to get honest results from this.

Idiots.

Old OT7
Old OT7

Big sigh...But, the report will just put off the inevitable crash that will come to the cult.  So we'll just carry on.

TheGuest
TheGuest

No procedures?  What the hell does that even mean?  There is an abundance of scientology policies and documents that are 100% clear cut with nomenclature like Employee. I say, Phoney Bulloney.

And by the way, this is another Charlie Sheen kind of winning for scientology.  This is yet another major world exposure in detail of their inhumane treatment of human beings, and yet again scientology admits it  it's A-OK because it was volunteers or ministers. 

For the few remaining scientologists who are supporting this organization,  it is impossible to say they didn't know.  They may not want to face it, but they know that the tech isn't working, otherwise, after 60 years why isn't the planet cleared, or at the very least,  why aren't these 12 million (lol) scientologists who are supposed to be so damn able after this tech, why can't they afford minimum wage and health care for their few thousand staff?   And why are there still so few staff and how can they possibly service millions?   There is no excuse any more scientologists.  You are enabling an abuser and supporting a human rights oppressor.

Let the Class Action Lawsuits begin.  When will the one  in the USA  start?

F_Randy_Hullabaloo
F_Randy_Hullabaloo

So, WTF happened? I don't think the CoS has the power to make the two versions so different. My guess is that there are other organizations that exploit volunteers which may have been threatened by draft... Too bad about this. I'm going out to kick a tree.

Sid
Sid

Gutted. Absolutely gutted. How the hell have they managed to get away with it? How have they managed to turn a highly-critical draft report into a small tap on the wrist?

Let's face it we know how they've done it, the same way they scare off every government organization: with an absolute deluge of serious-sounding legal threats and high-level influence.

This seems to be the second time that some major-sounding investigation has been leaked by excited critics, only to find that the Co$ has somehow derailed it.

The first was the FBI investigation that was revealed in the New Yorker article. At the time I winced when I read it because I'm sure the agents concerned did not want major publicity surrounding their investigation, and I did wonder whether the Church would up their efforts to get the investigation stopped.

We know the Co$ is capable of influence at the highest level so I think it would be best all-round if those who knew of any on-going investigations or the draft results of those investigations kept their mouths shut to give those investigations the best possible chance of concluding successfully.

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

Odd, off topic question—who owns/is behind the UK Daily Mail? Their coverage of the Suri Cruise and her entrance to the New Leadership Academy has a pro-Scientology skew:

"In her first few days, Suri has been introduced to the religion's founder, L. Ron Hubbard's ideas of affinity, reality and communication."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvs...

Mike
Mike

"So far he has recruited NONE and he is trying to find out the whereabouts of his 'pupil" Mr Saxton, the guy who ran away with the senator's and anonymous' donated money."

Is this really true?

SFF
SFF

Nice try. The report doesn't dispute any claims but disqualifies the witnesses because it was too long ago that they were employed or they were strangely considered to be volunteers.

Everything they alleged has been _confirmed_ by the CoS in other cases. They just claim they are allowed to treat workers that way because they are a religion.

Zero marks again, I'm afraid.

Perriclam
Perriclam

Thank you, scientology shill.

Funny how everyone who is against the human rights abuses of scientology is branded "anti-religious."  Another convenient lie from scientology. 

scifibandit
scifibandit

The evidence, sadly, is probably in the contract Number Seven signed. I believe every single staff contract for Orgs specifically states that the work is voluntary. Unfortunately, Number Seven was probably in a mental state of euphoria, and perhaps sleep deprivation, when he/she signed and perhaps didn't even read the clause. This is probably why he/she was confused as to his/her status. Once the contracts are signed, the org retains them... so he/she may not have had access to it to see what he/she has initially agreed to.

Moral of the story is: ALWAYS READ THE CONTRACT THOROUGHLY BEFORE SIGNING!  (And then make copies)

It is unfortunate that the law blurs the line between right and wrong behavior. It is certainly not right to treat the staff that way... I have witnessed people getting recruited for staff, and the recruiters paint a very different picture of what working for the org will be like for the recruit than what actually happens. When the new staff complain, the main defense the org uses is that they staffer is unhappy because he is not producing enough... hence, it's the staffer's fault that things are not what the recruiter said they would be.

TonyOrtega
TonyOrtega

I'm in touch with his people. Hoping to have an interview with him before too long.

Ron
Ron

He's trying, but Scientology's lying for money is complex.

F_Randy_Hullabaloo
F_Randy_Hullabaloo

Squeak!  I pressed you and that's the sound that came out.  Unless it was just gas -- I do smell a rotten egg: must be you.

SFF
SFF

Is Scientology trying to assert the practice of "lying for money" is a trade secret, or something? If not, why is it a problem if others do it to?

Not that you have the slightest bit of evidence that Senator Xenophon has a financial incentive here. If you did you would have produced it long ago.

Ron
Ron

"At that juncture, they could have raised questions or backed out--especially if they were minors."

You make it sound like a minor could just raise their hand and say "I want to go home", and it would all magically happen. It's more like a jail-break, crossing an unknown distance without cash or resources, and hopes that the minor's parents wouldn't be ordered to Disconnect afterward.

Matt Cramp
Matt Cramp

None of this makes any difference: in Australia, if you work, and if an organisation is issuing group certificates in your name you're working for them, then you are entitled to minimum wage, no matter how many letters L. Ron Hubbard wrote. The circumstances of the position don't matter; the unions pushed very hard to ensure that there was no way an employer could wriggle out of that obligation. Nothing exempts Scientology from that obligation so long as they have standards for their employees and issue group certificates, nor should they feel they have to if they're committed to acting in the best interests of their employees.

SFF
SFF

Your parents can't sell you in to slavery. In fact, you probably can't sell yourself into slavery either. Signing a piece of paper doesn't mean you no longer have rights.

Also, Hubbard policies do not trump labor laws.

The fact that the Church of Scientology in Oz is trying to claim people with employment contracts and mandatory full-time working hours are "volunteers" shows that they were deliberately trying to get around employment laws.

In the US they just claimed "ministerial exception" and have thus far gotten away with it (though the Supreme Court may soon change that), which is at least a more honest approach.

And your claim that they could easily have left if they decided they didn't like the working conditions -- even the Sea Org members -- is just dishonest. I assume at least part of your brain knows what the consequences for you would be if you just decided to leave.

But if you do decide, there are people here for you.

Marcotai
Marcotai

Well said. Somehow hate mongers can't understand it. They are just blind from their hatred.

scifibandit
scifibandit

Your bullet points are true. 

Sadly, some people sign and attest they fully understand what they are signing when they obviously don't.

I wish that practice would change, and all that time and money wouldn't be wasted.

William Lawd
William Lawd

"Let the Class Action Lawsuits begin.  When will the one  in the USA  start?"

No info, but if anything is ripe for a class action lawsuit it is Narconon. There is a large pool of potential complainants with causes of action that are identical and straightforward with few complexities, and involving individual refunds for fraudulent services of the relatively small of amount of $30,000.

The advantages of a Narconon class action lawsuit over against a class action for Sea org and staff underpayment of wages are considerable. 

Since Narconon is a front group that insists it operates as a secular 501(c)(3) non-profit without any control by the Church of Scientology it cannot resort to "ministerial exception" and the privileges and immunities attendant upon legal recognition as a religious organization.

The pool of Sea Org and staff victims is tiny compared to the numbers of non-Scientologist patients and their families who have funded Narconon treatment and even greater population of potential victims, namely all those who need and seek drug rehabilitation.

While a successful class action suit on wages and working conditions would be a severe financial blow, a successful Narconon suit would most likely mean the demise of Narconon and its future revenue streams. No one is going to pay for rehab that is clearly marked as a Scientology program.

Juries should have no problem arriving at the judgment that Narconon is fraudulently advertising totally bogus success rates and engaging in dangerous medical quackery with saunas, niacin overdosing, and seizure and withholding of physician-prescribed medications.

The key judgments to be made are that Narconon programs are 100% Scientology religious practice, that Narconon is under the complete control of the Church of Scientology, and that Narconon is a vehicle of Scientology religious proselytization. 

Everyone gets proselytized for Scientolog. What is significant is that practicing Catholics and Evangelicals are now making proselytization a specific cause of action in their individual suits for refunds since many have asked for explicit assurance before rehab that Narconon patients are not subjected to proselytization.

It cannot be emphasized enough that the Church of Scientology has far greater contact with a far wider range of social actors and institutions through Narconon and its "social betterment and humanitarian" front groups of which Narconon, Applied Scholastics, The Way To Happiness, and Criminon, 

Once Narconon is exposed in court all front groups are exposed.

Another advantage is that Narconon's victims are ordinary non-Scientologist wogs so they don't have to fear losing family members through disconnection. Likewise there are so many of them an already OSA already stretched thin cannot fair game effectively any but a few of them. 

Activist efforts to engage the interest of class action trial lawyers would pay off handsomely imho.

Mattee_From_Oz
Mattee_From_Oz

Welcome to Australian political intervention....

Yet another promising opportunity to quash these venom-spewing cockroaches who pray on the rich and stupid.

Matt Cramp
Matt Cramp

I'm not shocked, but that's because I never expected a 'final' report from an Australian bureaucracy to contain the same strong language that turns up in a 'draft'. I don't think the CoS had to lean very hard on the Fair Work Ombudsman to have the language toned down.

However, this isn't over: the leaking of the draft report is somewhat unusual for Australia, which suggests that someone at the Fair Work Ombudsman is telling us how they really feel. It made the rounds of the TV stations, so it's likely that the Australian media are going to keep an eye on the story, and they're likely to work references to the draft report into any stories on the CoS for the next year.

So while this doesn't mean the end of Scientology in Australia, what it does mean is that Scientology, at least for a little while, are going to be tainted with the slavedriver label. And Senator Xenophon's special committee is still waiting in the wings.

MarkStark
MarkStark

It's discouraging. I haven't followed this story in detail, but saw the news story the other day and thought the law suit involved workers within the last 6 years and I guess that wasn't the case.

I keep thinking that if Kaja Ballo had been the daughter of an American senator instead of a Norwegian politician, Scientology would have undergone investigation on a number of fronts and be shut down by now.

Scientology has influence in high places, but come on politicians, all you have to do is read the Reitman book or look at the last issue of Freedumb to know there is something SEVERELY wrong with this organization having "religious" status. 

scifibandit
scifibandit

Very interesting observation. I guess it could sound very positive that she's learning such 'advanced' concepts as ARC, but it also states that she isn't learning maths and words like normal children. As a parent reading that, it would frighten me away from the school, not attract me. I would be afraid that they were trying to brainwash my child into perceiving the world through narrowed vision.

F_Randy_Hullabaloo
F_Randy_Hullabaloo

I was saddened to see the brainwashing, indoctrination program getting underway for the child. As far as ownership of the newspaper -- check what's called the "Masthead" for that information or go to a site called Wikipedia, which itself has a lot of good articles about the cult. Have fun.

KeepOnLearning
KeepOnLearning

Every elected politician feeds on donations with which to buy and persuade votes.

Go back to civics class.

KeepOnLearning
KeepOnLearning

You knowingly lie to readers by your smarmy misuse of the word "slavery."

Worse, your usage of "slavery" trivialises--and subtracts credibility from--the plights of tens of thousands of people today who truly DO work in slavery.

* Slaves don't sign on voluntarily; they are routinely drugged, mugged or dragooned into service.   Sea Org members join voluntarily, and are free to muster out after ethics checks. When they work hard to dodge those ethics checks, people logically get suspicious of thievery, misdirection of funds, and the like.

* Slaves are paid NOTHING.   Sea Org members are paid weekly based on the org's revenue and their contribution. When production is up, SO members get additional bonuses, rewards, awards, and treats of fully paid nights out to meals and movies.

* Slaves cannot leave premises.   Sea Org members own cars or cycles, come and go as they please, jog around towns, get time off, take out-of-town vacations. Many travel on org business and could just disappear if they chose.

* Slaves commonly work at illegal activities such as drug or sex trades.   Sea Org members are helping themselves and others break through emotional barriers and lead wholesome, high morality lives.

* Slaves work in squalid conditions.   SO members are to bathe daily and dress neatly. They receive allowances for uniforms, and often work in buildings that are renovated every 10 to 20 years. Just look at the video of Scientology's new printing plant in City of Commerce, CA USA. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... 

* Slaves are physically beaten or tortured.   No SO member would dare do more than grab someone's shoulder to get his attention. I remind you that not one piece of physical evidence has ever been produced to support claims anyone was ever physically assaulted by any SO member.

* Slaves cannot leave servitude.   Sea Org members can muster out once they complete checks to ensure they are not leaving to dodge some theft, misuse of funds or other misdeed they may have perpetrated. Some do try to dodge that procedure and then rant about it. I know and am in touch with several ex-Scientologists and many ex-Sea Org members who roiuted out ethically.

There are real slaves in the world. Do not marginalise their awful plight by purposefully sloppy, prejudicial and misleading word usage. It's the first trick of any propagandist, and your team have been exposed employing it.

Xenu
Xenu

"Hate-monger" is a funny sort of term, isn't it?  You basically become one as soon as you use it.

hgc
hgc

Change the subject?  CheckAttack the attacker?  Check

TheGuest
TheGuest

Look at the history.  Each time sci was about to get hit,   a closed-door deal was made with a proviso of nondisclosure.  Just an educated guess.  So the deal would have to be they'll start paying minimum wage, I would think, which is what they said.  Of course, we all know that management will come up with other shell games and ways to get the money back from those still under their spell.

Then again,  there's nothing like holding cold cash in your hands while chained in the sweat of poverty.   It could break the chains clean through just long enough to Take a Walk, and forget to return. 

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

Right—yet another footbullet. 

I suppose the counter-spin is intended to be: "Look at these fabulous, wealthy, successful Scientologists and their extraordinarily fashionable daughter, doing cool normal family stuff at the New Leadership Academy! How exciting!"

But this is countering: "Scientology accused of Child Slavery." And  the over-promotion of "Suri Cruise—Child Fashion Plate" makes it all sound a bit sinister.

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

Yes, understood.

My thought is that Scientology's tactics are changing in the wake of so many leaving. There must have been a considerable exodus in 2008. What just happened in Australia sets bad precedent. However, the Cult's shield as a "Religion" is in place to assure that there will always be bad precedent as regards Scientology and the law. So when I see such things as the repetition of the same story of Suri Cruise having her first day at the New Leadership Academy and see postings such as the one at the Daily Mail, my mind goes conspiratorial on me. Particularly considering the general level of journalistic morality at UK's better known tabloids.

I wonder if this is someone's idea of counter-spin to the Ombudsman 's story in Australia?

SFF
SFF

Not all countries have institutionalized corruption to the extent the US has.

Besides, that generalization doesn't even remotely resemble evidence that he has received campaign contributions from specific groups who desire specific actions.

While Scientology may have declared war on psychiatry, most psychiatrists are unaware of this and are largely unimpeded by the CoS anyway.

Matt Cramp
Matt Cramp

Funny thing: one of Nick Xenophon's pet issues has been campaign finance. He's advocated for a bill that would ban all private donations, instead of merely requiring their disclosure. Political parties in Australia are mostly funded from the public purse, and there are strict rules governing what private donations can be accepted.

It's hard to imagine that Nick Xenophon is bought and paid for, considering his highly amusing habit of tilting at windmills.

Marcotai
Marcotai

Well...unfortunately  they exist. and of course in their own view whoever call them "hate mongers" is an hate monger.

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

You hang out with too many scientists. Just look at the tabloid rack on your way out of the grocery store, picture how many people will read that, compared to Scientific America.

Remember—the GOP [or their puppet masters] have managed to make evolution a wedge issue.

Yeah—Suri's lipstick and high heels matters more to your typical "US" fan than climate change.

scifibandit
scifibandit

LOL. Most people in the states find Suri-news distasteful and annoying. Only starstruck followers really care. Everyone with a mind of his own looks at that news and scoffs... or maybe I hang around too many scientists and have no idea how much 'the masses' are really influenced by a 5-year-old child, lol. 

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