Scientology Never Forgets: A Telemarketing Holiday Miracle

Categories: Scientology

TelemarketingBozo.jpg
"I'm a little bit out of the loop on that."
Fellow Scientology watchers, for this holiday Sunday I have a little nugget I thought you might find interesting. I'll be curious to see, in the comments, how significant you find this item -- just a fun diversion, or maybe a bit more portentious?

Anyway, I'll stop messing around and get to the point: On Friday, I received an e-mail from a man who has asked that I not name him. I can tell you that he's 62 years old and an attorney.

When he was much younger, he spent a couple of years in Scientology -- as he says, "I grew up in the 1960s and a lot of people were trying weird things back then." After his brief time in the organization, he hasn't had anything to do with it for almost 40 years.

In that time, he's gone to college and then law school, and has moved at least ten times, including across the country.

So he was surprised when, a few days ago, Scientology called him up on his cell phone to tell him how they'd like to get him back into the fold by selling him some books.

Stunned that the church would track him down after so long, the man thought I'd like to know about it. And he gave me the number the church had called him from.

So Friday afternoon, I gave that number a call...

But first, a little more about my tipster. It was in Berkeley that he fell into Scientology in 1970, and then just a couple of years later got out -- but not before banking money towards future courses that he never started. After he left in 1972, he asked for a refund, and never got it.

All this time, he figured asking for that refund might have been why Scientology left him alone as he went on with his life.

"I figured I was an SP or something," he says, referring to the way Scientology declares some former members or other people it considers enemies "suppressive persons."

"Basically, they left me alone. Now, 40 years later -- I'm 62 now -- I get a call on my cell phone!"

He says it was a woman, and she identified herself as being with Scientology. "She was very nice and she said words to the effect that something really important had happened in the church in 2007. She verified that I was the guy they were looking for. I said I was. She explained that in 2007 they discovered that the tech authored by L. Ron Hubbard had been changed, and people were reading works that weren't actually from the source. 'We've corrected the problem,' she said. And she asked to send me a DVD."

She described it as a video which portrays someone who has been out of Scientology for 20 years deciding to come back in the fold. He let her know about his request for a refund, that he'd paid for 3 courses he hadn't started and had asked for his money back.

"I told her that and she was still interested in sending me the stuff," he says. He expects the DVD in the mail any day now, and he's promised to forward it to me for my perusal.

Now, a couple of additional things to consider: first, Scientology is notorious for hounding people about new products, courses, and about spending money. And we often hear about people who complain that they can never get themselves removed from a Scientology mailing list, even if they've had almost no involvement with the organization. But 40 years? This seemed like a remarkable case.

My tipster still had the 323 number (a Los Angeles area code) that he'd been called from. So on Friday afternoon, I rang it.

"Scientology information center," answered a woman with a British accent.

I said hello, and explained the situation -- that a friend of mine had been out of Scientology for four decades, but the church had tracked him down to tell him about a new set of books. I told her this must be a pretty special set of volumes.

"It is indeed," she responded. "And we are doing a whole evolution of digging through our old correspondence files and finding anyone who has ever had any contact with the church."

That must be a lot of work, I said.

"It sure is. Who is this?"

I told her my name, and that I was with the Voice. And I asked her what her name was. Sylvia, she told me.

"Let me put you on hold and get you to someone who can do a whole briefing for you," she said.

Um, OK. At this point, I figured that I'd be switched to a media desk or something -- which was fine with me. I've been trying to get Karin Pouw or someone over at Scientology's PR department to call me for months, but they never return my calls.

Soon enough, a young-sounding man with an American accent picked up. He asked me who I was. So I told him.

"What's The Village Voice?" he asked. I told him it was a newspaper.

"I'm a little bit out of the loop on that," he said.

I didn't take it personally. Sylvia had apparently just transferred me to another working drone in the book-pushing department, and I reminded myself what so many ex-Scientologists have told me: church members live in a bubble, working insane hours and keeping themselves cut off from media and other influences of the outside world. This guy was just doing his job, clearing the planet, and it's no wonder that he hadn't heard of my publication.

I asked the guy his name, and he told me it was Nick Christensen. He was even nice enough to spell it for me.

Nick helpfully asked me to go to the church's main website, Scientology.org, and under "Landmark Events" I'd find information about "The Golden Age of Knowledge for Eternity" -- and that would tell me about this super special new set of books they are pushing.

Isn't it a lot of work, I asked him, to track down people who haven't been in Scientology for 40 years, to tell them about these books?

"It is a lot of work," Nick answered. "But some people were driven away from the church because of errors in the material. We want to make sure they know those errors have been corrected."

I thanked him for his time, and ended the phone call.

I then called Chuck Beatty, a former member of Scientology's Sea Org and an expert on Hubbard policies. He laughed when I told him why I was calling, and immediately quoted from the "green volumes" that compile Hubbard's many rules and regulations.

"You never take a person out of central files," Beatty said. And Beatty being Beatty, he then ran down various exceptions to that rule. He went on to explain that at the American Saint Hill Organization -- also known as "Big Blue," the large Scientology building that was once the Cedars of Lebanon hospital in Los Angeles -- the church keeps a giant database of people who have ever had interaction with Scientology. "They have the most massive U.S. and North American central files," Beatty said. "They must have fired a mission to dig up current phone numbers."

I told Beatty what Christensen had told me, about errors found in Hubbard's writings being responsible for driving away people, and that fixing those errors would bring people back.

"That's an internally acceptable explanation to the staff," Beatty said.

He went on to explain how, under leader David Miscavige, there had been two major shake-ups involving Hubbard's "technology." In 1996, auditors were told that their training had been in error, and they would be spending tens of thousands of dollars to relearn things -- new materials Miscavige dubbed "The Golden Age of Tech." (This was in part what began Tory Christman's disillusionment with Scientology, as I wrote in 2001.)

Then, in 2007, Miscavige made another major announcement. Hubbard's books had also contained errors, and a new set of corrected works would be released, requiring all Scientologists to buy a whole new set of materials.

"That's when Miscavige said, 'Fuck Ron, this is what I'm doing," says Marty Rathbun, the former high-level executive who left Scientology in 2004 and has been leading a major effort to criticize Miscavige's leadership.

"People who are leaving and still consider themselves Scientologists are pointing to one of those two events," Rathbun said, referring to the 1996 and 2007 revisions by Miscavige.

A steady stream of longtime church members has been declaring themselves "independent Scientologists" at Rathbun's blog, and they repeatedly cite Miscavige's tinkering with Hubbard's works -- followed by demands for do-overs on expensive levels -- as the reason they finally decided to get out.

"It's over. The church is so dead it isn't even funny. Those guys, to be putting so much effort into something that has been so discredited, five years after that stupid release, it's pathetic" Rathbun says. "Those people should be trying to get new people into Scientology. I mean, they're trying to get people who were in while Hubbard was still around and they remember what it was like then, and they're telling them 'We changed things'? -- that makes them squirrels, you know what I mean?"

Rathbun calling Miscavige a squirrel -- for our longtime readers, that should produce a chuckle. For our newer readers, allow me to explain.

One of the bedrock principles of Scientology is that L. Ron Hubbard -- also referred to as "Source" by his adherents -- laid down such a powerful set of ideas, his words are sacrosanct, and his instructions must be followed to the letter. This is not a casual notion. Scientology has paid big money to store copies of Hubbard's words in underground vaults on stainless steel tablets encased in titanium capsules, to ensure that his ideas survive a nuclear holocaust. Even though Hubbard died in 1986, his lectures and policies and books cannot be altered, and anyone who tries to use his ideas or processes outside official Scientology is, in the words of the church, a "squirrel." There is hardly a worse thing a Scientologist can be called.

When Rathbun went public with his independence movement, official Scientology went after him with a goon squad that calls itself "Squirrel Busters" -- complete with T-shirts that feature a picture of Rathbun's head on the body of a squirrel.

But as Rathbun points out, it was Miscavige, in 1996 and 2007, who boldly announced that there were errors in Hubbard's materials, altered them, and then demanded that church members redo levels and buy new books -- at amazing prices.

I know Rathbun is a controversial figure and many critics and ex-Scientologists are angry that a man who was once Miscavige's main enforcer and chief fixer is now saying that he's saving L. Ron Hubbard from the church Hubbard once founded. But he has a point about the 1996 and 2007 revisions -- they do appear to be a major reason behind Scientology's struggle to hold on to longtime members today.

But the church does try. I mean, if they're hunting down people like my tipster, nearly 40 years after he told Scientology to take a flying leap, that suggests a certain level of desperation, doesn't it?

And that, my fellow Scientology watchers, is your holiday miracle. Look for #12 in our big countdown to pop up tomorrow morning at 9 am, and this promises to be a big week for news overseas.

Now, go to the beach or something.



The Top 25 People Crippling Scientology
#13: Janet Reitman (and other journalists)
#14: Tory Christman (and other noisy ex-Scientologists)
#15: Andreas Heldal-Lund (and other old time church critics)
#16: Marc and Claire Headley, escapees of the church's HQ
#17: Jefferson Hawkins, the man behind the TV volcano
#18: Amy Scobee, former Sea Org executive
#19: The Squirrel Busters (and the church's other thugs and goons)
#20: Trey Parker and Matt Stone (and other media figures)
#21: Kendrick Moxon, attorney for the church
#22: Jamie DeWolf (and other L. Ron Hubbard family members)
#23: Ken Dandar (and other attorneys who litigate against the church)
#24: David Touretzky (and other academics)
#25: Xenu, galactic overlord


tortega@villagevoice.com | @VoiceTonyO | Facebook: Tony Ortega

See all of our recent Scientology coverage at the Voice

Keep up on all of our New York news coverage at this blog, Runnin' Scared

Tony Ortega is the editor-in-chief of The Village Voice. Since 1995, he's been writing about Scientology at several publications. Among his other stories about L. Ron Hubbard's organization:

The Larry Wollersheim Saga -- Scientology Finally Pays For Its Fraud
The Tory Bezazian (Christman) Story -- How the Internet Saved A Scientologist From Herself
The Jason Beghe Defection -- A Scientology Celebrity Goes Rogue
The Robert Cipriano Case -- A Hellacious Example of Fair Game
The Paul Haggis Ultimatum -- The 'Crash' Director Tells Scientology to Shove It
The Marc Headley Escape -- 'Tom Cruise Told Me to Talk to a Bottle'
The Aaron Saxton Accusation -- Australia turns up the heat on Scientology
The Jefferson Hawkins Stipulation -- Scientology's former PR genius comes clean
The Daniel Montalvo Double-Cross -- Scientology lures a young defector into a trap
A Church Myth Debunked -- Scientology and Proposition 8
Daniel Montalvo Strikes Back -- Scientology Hit with Stunning Child-Labor Lawsuits
When Scientologists Attack -- The Marty Rathbun Intimidation
A Scientologist Excommunicated -- The Michael Fairman SP Declaration
The Richard Leiby Operation -- Investigating a reporter's divorce to shut him up
The Hugh Urban Investigation -- An academic takes a harsh look at Scientology's past
Giovanni Ribisi as David Koresh -- A precedent for a Scientology-Branch Davidian link
Janet Reitman's Inside Scientology -- A masterful telling of Scientology's history
The Western Spy Network Revealed? -- Marty Rathbun ups the ante on David Miscavige
Scientology's Enemies List -- Are You On It?
Inside Inside Scientology -- An interview with author Janet Reitman
Scientology and the Nation of Islam -- Holy Doctrinal Mashup, Batman!
Scientologists -- How Many of Them Are There, Anyway?
Roger Weller's Wild Ride -- Scientology When it was Hip
The Marc Headley Infiltration -- A Scientology Spying Operation Revealed
Placido Domingo Jr: Scientology's Retaliation is "Scary and Pathetic"
An Interview with Nancy Many, Former Scientology Spy
The Paulien Lombard Confession -- A Scientology Spy Comes Clean
The Deputy Benjamin Ring Hard Sell -- Scientology wants your 401K
The Top 25 People Crippling Scientology -- the whole series!
The Squirrel Busters Busted -- Unmasking the Scientology PI in Charge
Tommy Davis, Scientology spokesman, secretly recorded discussing 'disconnection'
Scientology internal document says its Office of Special Affairs will 'handle' the Village Voice


My Voice Nation Help
73 comments
Lkenter7
Lkenter7

One thing that bothers me about contacting people who may now be in their 60s or older is that older people are often more vulnerable due to lonliness, illness etc. Certainly Scientology would have no scruples against preying on the elderly.

Taj Mahal India
Taj Mahal India

Very nice post regarding Scientology Never Forgets: A Telemarketing Holiday Miracle

Roger
Roger

-By the way, I know that to some it may seem that Scientology or Dianetics is unscientific. I used to think that it wasn't, but what I've found out is that It simply offers ways to solve problems, just like math offers ways to build bridges, rockets, and buildings. The fact that you can't see or touch a number or a plus, minus, or division sign doesn't make math unscientific, but many people don't look at different science systems as simple ways to solve problems. That's all that Scientology or Dianetics is. You obviously can't touch knowledge, a memory, or your imagination, so, LRH just gave us the next best thing: symbols. He put these symbols into his own math problems which he figured out would bring about desirable effects in his patients. If I tell you that by giving me money, you will make me happy, you not being able to touch or see "happy" doesn't make the result any different. You will in fact be able to see the result, which is me smiling and thanking you sincerely. Even though your findings may not seem "scientific", you can make the equation Roger + Money = a happy man. This may or may not fit your idea of science, but if you get the same result time and again and you put together enough of these unvarying equations, you can consider that you've discovered your own science. I think that LRH just didn't really care about any authorities agreeing that he discovered a science and simply put it to use. I don't know the Church's affairs, but only wish to clear up why you'll run into information about Dianetics and Scientology being sciences or scientific. Say what you want about your bad experiences with people from the Church, lord knows I've had my share, But LRH was a goddam mathematician and a straight up scientist. You've got to think with the possibility that much of his material may have been altered and so this would naturally lead to the members using altered philosophies, etc. You've got to remember that LRH made many enemies in the medical, psychiatric, and governmental communities. Would you be happy if someone was taking your patients and fixing them up for less money and more permanently? Well, that's what LRH ran into. As a side note, the first publisher to print his book "Dianetics", Hermitage House, was a publisher of books on psychology. By the way, If you come accross any of his books printed before his death in '86, give them a try and see if you don't start feeling more active and alert and making people laugh more often.

Roger
Roger

Hi. This is a little off the topic, but I couldn’t help but notice that LRH wrote in 1965 that “1 has been done” in reference to “have the correct technology” in the KSW reference. An outpoint is that in the 1976 edition of handbook for preclears, Every axiom has after it a hyphen, whereas the new one has a colon. Also, many of the importances have been altered, such as by adding capitalizations, italics, and more divisions throughout the book. The reason that I bring this up is because If LRH wrote this tech and was such a mental expert, then he must have had his reasons for laying his work out the way that he did- and leaving it that way since 1951. I’m sure that there’s results possible with the new Handbook, but I myself went through it once or twice and didn’t get near the results that I’ve had from doing the ’76 edition up to only the third act. I actually display the tone antagonism, which I used to pretend, as well as my physical activity level and ability to hold my own viewpoint and communicate with others smoothly have already gone way up, and it’s only my third day. Here’s an Idea for anyone who’s having trouble understanding the concept of theta. In algebra, if you saw x, which represented space, you wouldn’t expect to be able to touch x, but you would expect to be able to use x to solve certain problems. Well, theta, the idea, is similar to x representing something. It is simply something which we haven’t been able to locate, but which LRH uses to represent the part of the organism which is ultimately in control, which we can’t touch or see, but which we can influence and rehabilitate, (or not). I’m sure there’s more to it than that, but I’m just kind of using that as a stable datum because the way one of my friends talks about it, you’d think that “theta” came in aerosol cans, but in fact, it’s as simple as LRH probably tried to locate the control center of men, but didn’t, but rather than give up there, he tried to influence it still and so came up with the word “theta”-from greek, of course, to be the “x” for this thing that he was rehabilitating, but couldn’t touch, see, etc. If anyone has additional material from LRH that you could direct us to, I know I’d be grateful.

SuzyQ
SuzyQ

I was tracked down after 29-years, two name changes (married then re-married), three moves including into a new state.  I think they are using Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, etc. to track folks down... can not confirm but seems possible.

I was so stunned & shocked that I just started screaming into the phone "how did you find me" - "leave me alone".  My poor, never been a scio-bot, husband was at my side trying to figure out what happened.  I hung up and was so upset, hubby ask if we should get a gun.  I told him no - but the calls continue UNTIL!

I offered to help the caller to "escape" from Scio-bot world.  I offered the assistance of "others" who would help her get in touch with family, a job, freedom.  She hung up ASAP & I have never received another call.

If I get another call I will be filing a police report & "taking steps to protect my interest".

scilonschools
scilonschools

I wonder how many Data protection laws the Cult breaks each day?

Dallas
Dallas

Nick Christensen, Brother to Erika Christensen (actress).  He works at Bridge Publications who is the Scn publishing branch responsible for producing and selling all these re-writes.

Jenny Blow
Jenny Blow

It's not just the 1996 and 2007 revisions. Hubbard started this game in 1970 with his KSW series, becaise as he explained, people had been altering his tech after 1966, bla-bla-bla. This became a regular excuse. 1978 was another year with a huge overhaul of tech, then 1987 because LRH had died and it was a program to review and publish everything he had written (completed in 1991 with an amnesty). But these things go on continually, there was also the year when the the arbitraries got removed for the OT levels (1998?). I'd say expect a new year of overhaul in about one decade from 2007.

Heather Grace
Heather Grace

This is how they can tell the ABC (Australian public radio) that there are a quarter of a million Aussie scientologists, when the 2006 census tallied the grand number of 2,513. In total.

As the Eagles sang, "You can check out, but you can never leave..."

NyHotAds
NyHotAds

Scientology, never read about. Very interesting, thank you.

Sid
Sid

Compare this desperation, this hounding of anyone who has ever gotten onto their database, with Tommy's assertion the other day that the church has grown more in the last 1 year than in the last 5 and more in the last 5 than the last 50.

In Tommy's view of the world, based on that truly epic exponential growth they must be literally turning them away at the church doors, they must be struggling to cope, it must be like the first hour of an "Everything Must Go Sale" when they open the doors!

So why do they sound so desperate for old members to return?

MarkStark
MarkStark

"People were driven away from the church because of the errors in the material."

That's going to be a big draw for people in their 60's. It's more likely they are building this "force" of seething seniors, by tormenting them with calls and junk mail.

They may as well tell them about the people who thought they were "clear" who really weren't, and they need a do-over, to become "clear-again" Scientologists. No wonder it didn't work the first time! There were errors in the materials.

The ultimate threat:

"Send in a thousand dollars or we'll call all your neighbors and tell them you are a Scientologist."  

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

From the Department of Documentation of Epic Failures or DO-DO-EF:

"Do not listen to show as its weird and has squirrel stuff on it"

I nominate this quotation for the serious consideration of the meme generation committee.

I just love the protective/paranoid/prissy/politically correct/scared tone of it, and the unintended suggestion that literal squirrel shit is being referred to.

Also, scientologists rejecting something for being "weird" is like weird cubed. The whole quote is like another version of "pay no attention to the man behind the curtain".

from:

http://forums.whyweprotest.net...

Jeffpat123
Jeffpat123

Hey Tony, Straighten up the picture of Hitler on your bedroom wall, put away the Mein Kamph novel;tell the terroist hate group Anonymous you will call them later, and go take a walk--a long walk!!"Hence today I believe that I am acting in accordance with the will of the Almighty Creator: 'by defending myself against the Jew, I am fighting for the work of the Lord." -Adolf Hitler (Mein Kampf)I think the above quote sums up Tony's sentiment for Scientology....

Sid
Sid

Hey Jeff

What's your sentiment for the Village Voice?

Is it " to dispose of them quietly andwithout sorrow." - L. Ron Hubbard, SCIENCE OFSURVIVAL, p. 170 ?

How about "The sudden and abrupt deletion ofall individuals occupying the lower bands of the Tone Scale from thesocial order would result in an almost instant rise in the culturaltone and would interrupt the dwindling spiral into which any societymay have entered." from the same book?

Presumably you agree that "Now, get this as a technical fact,not a hopeful idea. Every time we have investigated the backgroundof a critic of Scientology, we have found crimes for which thatperson or group could be imprisoned under existing law. We do notfind critics of Scientology who do not have criminal pasts."- L. Ron Hubbard, HubbardCommunications Office Bulletin, 5 November 1967, "Critics ofScientology"

MarcAbian
MarcAbian

You can tell right away that Jeffpat123 is a representative of the Scientology corporation working for it's "secret service" OSA branch, but not because he disagrees strongly with the article.  Rather, you can tell because he attacks the reporter instead of anything mentioned in the article, the attack is out of proportion to anything written in the article, he tries to draw the discussion and people's attention away from the contents of the article, and when challenged about this he will most likely continue posting personal attacks and never engage in a real discussion about the article.

Clarkle
Clarkle

I'd bet my last dollar that he hasn't read this article or any of the others.  More than likely he's been told not to read the article because it's full of "squirrel" material, and  I'd also bet that his post came from a script given to him by his higher ups.  How does it feel to be free, Jeff?

turntoleave
turntoleave

$cientology is the best modern day example of totalitarianism since naziism - but set in a modern corporate culture. Thankfully, the good will out and Scientology will die - starting with Australia, soon.

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

Here's some insightful info posted to the forums by OTBT from snippets of info others posted a while back about the mailing list. I was looking for any policies on ASK OFF, what was done with correspondence returned with a request to be taken off the mailing list when I came across it. ASK OFF used to mean something back in the old days in HCO but I guess one had to be privy to Div 2 Central Files to know the facts!

From the wwp thread" New COS Detective Hat; COS contacts ex Scientologist after 40 years"

"One of the first shockers for me when joining staff was to find out about the policy that states that someone is never taken off the mailing list even if they write in to ask to be removed this didn't seem right to me....Thats right. You get listed as Ask Off, but remain in the system. If declared, you get listed as SP, or deadfiled SP. No names get removed. There's no ability to remove names from the computer system. And the only way to get out of the old file CF system is if they lose your file, which can happen, LOL.I was one of a few SO staff who worked on the computerizationproject which consisted of entering to the mailing list the nameand address of *every* person who had:1) ever done a "course" service and/or received "auditing" in aScientology "org", "mission" or "field group"2) bought and/or read a book (usually _DMSMH_)3) asked for more information (either by written letter or by sending ina tear-out card inside a book)4) asked off the mailing list (called "ask off")5) been labelled "PTS", declared "SP", tabbed "dead file" ("DF"),"dropped the body" (tabbed "X"), "legal threat" (tabbed "L"), etc  "

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

Lucky me, I never did any of those things.

I know people who did, the stream of shit from Clearwater is just endless.

And now for something completely different: pictures of covers from FATE magazine, going back to 1948:

http://www.fatemagcollector.co...

Why? Because these covers go back to the inception of Scientology and demonstrate the mindset of the demo just waiting for Scientology to drop. And because some of those people who eagerly awaited the next issue of FATE wound up working for Scientology at sub-human wages for decade upon decade.

GarryS
GarryS

Tony.. Nick Christensen is a Sea Orger posted at Bridge Publications, as is his wife, Sylvia, whom you also spoke with. Nick is the brother of Scilon actress Erika Christensen.

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

Good digging! This should spice things up a bit, LOL.

Red_Zone
Red_Zone

One word came to mind as I started to read this article to describe what Scientology is doing when they track down ex members and send them a whole manner of their materials; 'stalk-a-grams'.

Because that is EXACTLY what they are. They are telling you they know where you live, they can find you at any time and they will KEEP sending you stuff and calling you until you cave.

It's a mental game; they want you to break down and buy what they're selling, in the faint hopes that they'll be left alone. But it never works that way, does it?

Endscientology
Endscientology

As there is a tendency for some Scientology arguments tend to buy into Godwin's Law, I'll be the one to 'go there' with this comment to Tony's blog about the desperate culties calling members they know are well past their prime market, the youthful, curiosity crowd.

Calling in older, non active old men/women into the orgs resembles the last days of WWII, when Germany drafted young boys and old men to protect Berlin.  This pathetic act of desperation was out of necessity due to shrinking forces and resources tied up on several foreign fronts.  We all know how well that worked out.

Time to call in Kitler and his LOL Cat army for reinforcements. 

Gary Lee-Nova
Gary Lee-Nova

Fascinating and astute observation!

And I fully agree with your assertion about the cult tactics being the actions of desperate entities.  Egyptian Pharaoh jokes aside, the degree of denial is increasing exponentially as the cult is slowly but surely swallowed and buried in the bogs and swamps of history.

Hunter S. Dogs
Hunter S. Dogs

I blew about 1973,

I still receive mail. It is sent to my mother's address. She lives in the same house all these years later. I visit her on Sundays. About two years ago I got a phone call, on Sunday, while visiting. Only the presence of my dear mother stopped me from overstepping the bounds of proper decorum with the brainwashed culties.

Concerning the mailing list-- another friend who blew suggested that the reason that I not only get mail but duplicate mail from a variety of sources is because to scratch me any list would reduce someone's stats. I am very happy that the money used to pay for 40 years of junk mail has more than equalled the money I spent on their poisonous "tech" all those years ago.

Sampson Simpson
Sampson Simpson

I am disturbed that the OSA handlers are not represented.  You people must not have been very nice to them.

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

It's like Tourtettes—I cain't stop sayin' "En-toi-bo-lated", jes cain't. Skeers 'em off, lak usin' a flashlight on Racoons.

robert
robert

We offered them cake.  But I think they wanted toilet paper. :P

Ness
Ness

I have to confess I've been lurking about watching the comment board for a few weeks now...the level of intelligence of the commenters (with one exception ;) ) is incredible.  I aquired an interest in CO$ back when Anonymous first started protesting.  I've done the research, in fact keeping tabs on whats going on in the anti-sci world has become somewhat of a hobby.  I have to say, this blog rocks!  Tony's work is incredible...but the loyal folk who post on this site are just as great.  Keep up the good work guys!

Guest
Guest

Ness,

Great post!  Awesome to have you here!

Take care!

 

Joe_Lynn
Joe_Lynn

The 'Golden Age of Tech' (1996) and 'The Basics' release (2007) are both the direct result of Scientology having nothing new to sell and no new customers to sell the old crap to.  The end result of both has been to 'decertify' long-time Scientologists and force them to 'retrain', for auditors, and 'retread' for everyone else, all of the early 'courses', 'levels' and 'processes'.

Naturally, and even though the excuse is that the materials themselves were faulty, it's the *customer* who has to pay.  There is no warranty on faulty Scientology Services, because that's the only kind they have or will ever have.

And, while there are additional and more subtle purposes behind the 'rollouts', the common and primary one is the same; more money.  And, *that* is no different than it ever was in Scientology, including when L. Ron Hubbard ran things.

The only 'difference' is that, when Ron needed more cash from the mooches, he could just whip out a new revelation; a new 'level'; a new book, tape or lecture.  If you're looking for 'squirrels' in Scientology, you need to look to the 'basic basic' squrrel; L. Ron Hubbard.

And, although Miscavige has had some play with 'releasing' new and 'formerly lost' Hubbardspew, there's a limit on what he can get away with, especially since his dwindling market *is* long-term Scientologists, many of whom can actually remember the 'Old Days' far too well.

So, auditors need to be retrained (at their own expense); 'Clears' have to be told that they weren't really 'Clear' and do it all again.  OTs need to redo their OT levels in light of 'new data' and on and on and on.

And, *everybody* needs to do the 'Purif' over and over and over, because, well, you know how it is, somehow they've *all* been exposed to toxins, drugs or radiation yet *again* and despite the fact that the 'Purif' was supposed to make them immune once and for all.

The message here is;  'You're nobody.  We gave you your 'certs' and we can take them away. Pay up or get out (with all that entails).'

Has it gotten worse since Ron died?   It's certainly gotten more blatant, but, only because *there is nothing new to sell*.  Back in the day, Ron, the SuperSquirrel would just whip out some new miracle and demand that everyone buy. 

Marty's analysis, rationalization and timeline is so much bullshit.   He's careful to announce that 'anybody leaving Scientology now and still calling himself a Scientologist left because of 'bla bla'.'   And, yes, 'The Basics' and the 'Golden Age of Tech' are often in the mix in driving people 'off lines' and few Scientologists make an immediate break with the Cult.  Most fade away (carefully, so as to avoid being 'declared' and 'disconnected') and, still believing themselves to be 'Scientologists', get on with their lives, only slowy recovering and discovering that rather than 'scientologists', they're *human beings*.

And, the reasons they fade away are myriad.

So, whether discussing his upcoming 'European Salvation Tour' or how 'Freedom Magazine' has been destroyed and perverted by 'Miscavige' or the 'why' of Scientology's failure, Marty is full of shit, self serving, and deliberately dishonest.

I'll just close with a quote from 'Pooks', whose comment on Rathbun's 'Freedom Magazine' hooey is just as accurate and relevant to *any* information he's 'sourcing':------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Re: Marty on Freedum Magazine and coverage of The New Yorker debacleI'm going to post what I posted on WWP Marty is a lying piece of shit. Freedum Magazine has long been the PR tool of the cult to attack it's critics. They "exposed" Interpol's connection to Nazis because Interpol was "attacking" or investigating the cult. They "exposed" IRS abuses because the IRS wouldn't give them tax exemption. Freedum exposed or tried to clean up "rotten spots" as part of their PR Plans and Programs written by the GO and OSA. They were used as "PR Flanks" to attack those that Scn wanted attacked. Marty is a delusional kool aid drinker and should wake up or diaf."

Xenunymous
Xenunymous

This isn't anything very new, I received no phone calls from them for 20 years, then started getting them again a dozen or so years ago.  So did some other people I'd known who left around the same time.  It seemed that they had begun using "people finder" services to track down long gone exes such as myself.  At first it was only an occasional effort to get me to buy books with money I had left on account, but then when the Basics sets came out, it became relentless.  Some combination of enturbulating callers, moving, and housemates saying "wrong number" has bought me peace lately.  Those with less patience can get off the list by becoming Type C PTS: threatening to sue, attack or embarass the CoS.  This is not only the sole LRH-sanctioned method of getting off their mailing lists, but also has the added benefit of making your immediate family illegal PCs.  The CoS might choose to ignore their own policies, if they don't believe you'd do too much harm relative to however much money or slave labour they expect to squeeze out of your family members, so make sure it's a scary threat, and one you're willing to carry out.  Be ready to contact various government officials, and CC local media, national media, Caberta, Xenophon, etc.  Be ready to write 100 bad online reviews of CoS organizations and front groups, and picket/leaflet outside the local org.  You may or may not have missing relatives reappear, but you will very definitely be off their mailing list.

Anyway, none of this is new, it's been going on since the late '90s.  It's undoubtedly a sign of desperation, but they've been desperate for a long time.

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

. . . ever since those one-eyed slugs showed up and attached themselves to my brain I've been, I've Been, I've been, eversince . . .

But seriously, I'll bet Miscavige will be a significant footnote as regards the Great Depression of 2013.

MarcAbian
MarcAbian

A more realistic scenario will be that in 100 years time Scientology will be forgotten, as will Tom Cruise.  Only a few history buffs will be curious enough to spend any time finding out about it.

kyote
kyote

I have to say that whenever I read about how they push books and dvds, or buy huge buildings and build expensive printing presses and film/video post-production facilities -- it's just further proof of how completely out of touch or out of date their (or Miscavige's) whole mindset or outlook is.  Or it's possibly evidence that CoS is actually a pyramid scheme or insular cult.  Because honestly, to be relevant nowadays, what the vast majority of companies, organizations, and even religions are doing to get their info out is to have podcasts, digital video or audio, smart phone "apps", Kindle or E books, etc.  Doesn't even the catholic church have an app these days?  I like paper books, I'm sure printed books will be around forever to some degree, but it's less and less possible to get people to buy "volume sets" of anything.  And DVDs will be gone like VHS tapes within a few years.  It's just embarrassing how their entire aesthetic, methods, and materials are still stuck in the '80s.  Not to mention all the wasted money.  I mean really, anyone can produce quality video, audio, and written content and get it out there to the world (even on iTunes or Amazon or personal website, whatever) with a small sparse office space and one iMac, a basic digital camera and microphone.  Sad.  Besides all the wasted resources (and absolutely yes, the un-ecological carbon footprint from producing DVDs and printing), from a marketing perspective, it's just so out of touch that it's glaring how unsuccessful they are and will be.  And yeah, their logo needs a serious modern update as well.  They aren't attracting any new people with their 1982 vibe.  Sorry.  Don't mean to be petty or attack anyone's personal tastes, but from a practical consumer standpoint, that's just reality.

robert
robert

But the problem is that they have to operate within LRH frameworks, and the importance of the book.  They are stuck in 1950s definitions and attitudes.

robinlandseadel
robinlandseadel

To speak of all the world's religions [save the "religion" of Scientology] as evil implants from a monster from deep space—this "mind" is not merely stuck in 50's definitions and attitudes. Scientology is stuck in Ed Wood's second re-write of his unfinished magnum opus "Commies From Space". As this was to be secretly funded as toilet supplies for "Operation Paperclip" Eddie was to have a whole $4 budget for this movie, a quantum leap upwards. When finally released as "Clambake Earth," it was felt that the Orgs timing might have been a little off.

Like, say 50 years off.

Scientology was created by a semi-smart scam artist, one who would grab at zombie-brained cultural shifts as they oozed by—most of the malgician's scrying via the latest issue of "FATE" magazine. "FATE" magazine—bet most of you out there in "Cultland" never heard of that little missive. "FATE" managed to compress all the various De-Brained flavours of Wacky Cults into a Reader's Digest sized monthly periodical. All your Area 51 and new improved Hypnosis techniques, early reports of LSD [sourced from MKULTRA?] and advertisements from the Rosecrucians. "A-a-a-and what about these photos of Aliens? Huh? You think they just make this stuff up?"

http://www.fatemagcollector.co...

Scientology—the religion of LRH just makin' shit up.

[O-o-o-o, evil cackle—could one of you anonymous out there in Netland, some Sub Genie cook up a 1948 FAKE magazine cover, featuring LRH?:

The Man Who Talks to little Dolls!

L. Ron Hubbard and the Little People!

The Clearwater Snakepit!

Katie Holmes—Goddess of Sex!]

Clarkle
Clarkle

I know this is a strectch, but couldn't you make a case against scientology for fraud?  If you purchased books and courses under the pretense that the tech is "perfect" and then told years later that it wasn't, it seems to me that they would, at a minimum, have to replace the books.  Wal-Mart wouldn't make me re-purchase a defective product, so I guess that would make them more ethical than Scientology, the Most Ethical People on the Planet. 

SFF
SFF

There is a big Scientology disclaimer at the beginning of a lot of books now indicating that there is no implied promise to actually cure or deliver anything.

If the FDA decides that they have jurisdiction over Scientology "therapy" that disclaimer isn't going to protect them but it might be enough so long as they have the religious cover.

Hunter S. Dogs
Hunter S. Dogs

It sound sort of like Toyota recalling a car because of bad breaking.

robert
robert

Well, this has certainly been pursued in France.  Not only with the most recent conviction in October 2009.  There have been several prior fraud convictions, including Hubbard's conviction in absentia for fraud in 1978.  

There are actually many possible criminal actions one could take and make stick.  But you need government with the will to do it.  We need our Xenophon here, and/or the finalization of the FBI's case.  But consider the many tentacles, levels and aspects of such a federal action. The effort would be of necessity massive if it were to be a truly finishing stroke.

Right now, it is the death of a thousand cuts.  But, a death all the same, however slow.  

MarkStark
MarkStark

The mailing list buildup could also be about the Super Powerz building. Forget about the typos in the Basic Books, they'll need to get everyone down to Clearwater for astronaut training. Mars needs moms.

Jefferson Hawkins
Jefferson Hawkins

Tony, I was just heading out to the river myself, but had a few comments. First, to a Scientologist, there is no such thing as an Ex-Scientologist. If you ever were a Scientologist, no matter how briefly - even if you just bought a book - you are always a Scientologist. You are just "inactive" for one reason or another - you had "misunderstoods" on Hubbard's materials, you "skipped a gradient," you "had an ARC Break," and so on. As Hubbard's materials can never be wrong, then "obviously" people only leave because they didn't get it. So there is a consistent and massive effort to "recover inactive Scientologists" by showing them how and why they "didn't get it." When I was part of Scientology's marketing department, we were constantly berated for all of these "inactive Scientologists" and tasked with coming up with more and more ways to "recover" them.

Secondly, their massive membership numbers - six million or 20 million or a gazillion - depend on counting all of these "inactive" Scientologists.

Third, as Hubbard's materials can never be wrong, they have to dream up reasons why people didn't get it. A favorite one is "there were errors in the books" or "there were errors in the materials." How Hubbard could have missed all of these supposed errors is never explained. They did this in 1991, when all of Hubbard's books were gone through and "corrected" so that they were "exactly as Hubbard intended." Scientologists were then told to discard their old "inaccurate" books and buy a whole new set of books. This was 1991. Then they did the exact same caper in 2007, again saying that the books all had errors, redoing them all, and forcing all Scientologists to buy all new books. That Scientologists fell for it TWICE shows the level of cult indoctrination - they believe anything they are told, even if it contradicts what they were told before.

All of these shenanigans speak of a high level of desperation in the Church. They are shrinking, losing members every day, and not bringing in new people (as the truth about the organization is all over the internet). Their only "expansion" is a massive real estate scam.

Karen de la Carriere
Karen de la Carriere

Jeff ~~Very good post.A real life example of what you state is a case of someone I took to Celebrity Center who had expressed some interest in doing a Purification Rundown way back in early 1990s.He really liked the idea of the exercise regime with vitamins and sauna.  He had a medical background.  No sooner had he paid some $1500 to do this when a bait and switch was done.  He was told he HAD to do a PTS/SP course,meaning he had to first  be schooled and educated on Suppressives before he would be permitted to do a Purification Rundown.He was out.He did not feel this was correct or fair.His money was refunded.BUT they would  NOT let him go.For YEARS he was deluged with PROMOTIONAL mail from various entities.  Flag Freewinds, AOLA, ASHO.  It would not stop.  He called and asked off, he even tried calling  the DO NOT call line to get off their computer generator lists.It continued inexorably.They would not let go of him even when he acted menacing.It was SPAM.  It was a waste of their dollars but they continued.He thought he could get rid of them by calling in a change of address.He called in a PO BOX #.That got entered in the system and sometimes he was deluged with the same promoto both addresses !Scroll forward a few years.He shut down the PO BOX and no longer pays for it.But the little mom and pop store with the PO BOX  still YEARS later and in PRESENT real time, still gets their Promo !He is now being threatened by the PO Box owners to pay up as the PO Box is still being used week in and week out YEARS after he shut the PO box down with weekly Church Promo soliciting $$$ for Basics, Books and courses.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Guest
Guest

....and Marty was the one who followed them home,on airports,do all dirty job,raid houses,he was just following LRH. and now he is nice......What if D.M. is last 5 years-nice?are OTV-VIIIs allowed to have plastic on face?Big hello from LRHs Bulgravia.

Guest
Guest

who is Karen and who are you?....And better stop attacking CULT-you must attack $cientology and LRH-that is root of all problems.And why didn t you react on Marty,like that,when he was attacking Tony?Big hello from LRHs Serbia.

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

Your comment is rude and off topic. Leave Karen alone.

Joe_Lynn
Joe_Lynn

"Secondly, their massive membership numbers - six million or 20 million or a gazillion - depend on counting all of these "inactive" Scientologists."

Except Jeff, there is no counting.  Never was.  The numbers Scientology gives for 'membership' are entirely vapor.  The numbers are whatever they *should* be.  If the last public statement said '6 million', well, this time it'd better be '8 million', since Scientology is the 'fastest growing religion'.

I think it was Mark Plummer who revealed that the 'CF' (Central Files) numbers were never much beyond 250,000, even counting people who had merely been so imprudent as to give the Cult their name and address when buying a book or taking a 'personality test'.

As to anyone who was ever a Scientologist *still* being a Scientologist, just 'ARCbroken' or 'suppressed', they also play the other side of the coin, as can be visible on Rathbun's blog.  There is no such thing as an 'ex' Scientologist because, *anyone who left never WAS a Scientologist*.  They may have been infiltrators, spies, plants etc., but, not Scientologists.

Scientologist is nothing if not versatile, except, it's not versatile at all, because *it's always the same bullshit*; just comes in different flavors depending on the market.

MarkStark
MarkStark

All these people on the mailing list are waiting to be "activated," kind of like "the largest independent relief force" no wait... the largest "humanitarian and aid" organization on Teegeeack. Scientology's Volunteer Ministers form a "virtual  army tens of thousands strong." Well, they got the "virtual" part right.

Maybe the cult should convert itself into a video game, so they could save the planet virtually. 

Now Trending

New York Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

Loading...