Michael Fairman Sues his Chiropractor -- in Part to Legitimize the Independent Scientology Movement?

MichaelFairmanKR.jpg
Michael Fairman, giving an interview to Mark Bunker for his documentary, Knowledge Report
We've said it before: Michael Fairman is one of our favorite former members of the Church of Scientology, and someone we've talked to quite a few times in recent months.

We were caught by surprise Sunday, however, when TMZ reported that Fairman, a familiar character actor and soap star, is suing his former chiropractor, claiming religious discrimination.

Earlier this year, Fairman announced that he had been excommunicated from the Church of Scientology. His chiropractor, an active Scientologist, then sent out a notice to Fairman and his wife that they were no longer welcome as patients. Fairman's lawsuit points to California law, which says that chiropractors are among the businesses that cannot discriminate on the basis of religion.

Fairman didn't return my phone call yesterday, which was a first -- but I've been told that on the advice of his attorney, he can't talk about the lawsuit.

I know enough about Fairman's back story, however, and about the former Scientology executive he mentions in the lawsuit -- Marty Rathbun -- to know that this lawsuit is about more than the pain and suffering of being rejected by a neighborhood spine twister.

It also appears to be about legitimizing the independent Scientology movement.

First, as to the merits of his lawsuit. I asked Scott Pilutik to look over Fairman's complaint and give me his thoughts. Pilutik is a Manhattan attorney who has watched Scientology closely for more than a decade, and who is often called upon to explain and interpret complex church legal cases for the Scientology-watching community at large.

He looked over the particulars of the complaint, which allege that since 2003, Fairman has been a patient of Charlene Thorburn and her business, Thorburn Chiropractic and Wellness Center in Burbank. Thorburn, the court document says, is an active Scientologist. Fairman himself has been a Scientologist since at least the early 1980s, and for a time was even the "face" of the religion, appearing on Scientology's promotional films and television commercials.

In April, Fairman revealed publicly that he'd been declared a "suppressive person" by the church -- excommunicated, in other words -- because he had been spending time with former top Scientology executive Marty Rathbun. He reveals in the complaint that it was in January that he "became concerned about the manner in which the doctrines of the Church of Scientology were being applied" when he sought out Rathbun.

Fairman was subsequently declared an SP even though he, his wife Joy Graysen Fairman, and his daughter Sky Fairman, were still continuing "to use many of the teachings" of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard.

With Fairman and his wife leaving the church, "family, friends, and business associates who are Scientologists disconnected from them."

Here at the Voice, we've written extensively about the way Scientologists who change their minds about the church are declared "suppressive," and then all church members of good standing are required to cut off all ties from them in what is called "disconnection" -- even if it means a mother turning her back on a son or daughter.

On October 1, Michael and Joy received a letter from Thorburn which said, "I will no longer be your treating Chiropractor effective 10 days from the date of this letter." (I called Thorburn's office yesterday and reached "Jobee," the receptionist mentioned in the complaint. She took my number, saying she'd have Thorburn call me back.)

The Fairmans had heard earlier from another Scientologist, their dermatologist, Lisa Benest, that she was dropping them as patients, and they believe Benest advised Thorburn to do the same. (I have not received confirmation but suspect that a similar lawsuit will be filed against Benest.)

Fairman had not seen Thorburn for an appointment since 2008, but according to the complaint Joy saw the chiropractor regularly. And after receiving the letter, she called the Thorburn clinic to ask why they were being dropped but got no reply from Thorburn. The Fairmans then requested that their medical records be sent to them, but have heard no response.

The Fairmans are suing for unspecified damages, saying that Thorburn clearly dropped them as clients for religious reasons, which is a violation of California Civil Code sections 51 and 52 (the Unruh Civil Rights Act).

I asked Scott to assess the merits:

I think it's a real good discrimination complaint, and I'm glad to see it's been filed, as this sort of conduct has gone on for years without any penalty to the Scientologist discriminators. The California Civil Rights Act unambiguously makes all California "businesses" common carriers and prohibits them from discriminating on the basis of race/sex/religion/etc. Since Thorburn is a business and since the Fairmans allege discrimination as the basis for Thorburn's refusal to treat, I think it should survive a motion to dismiss. It's not a common discrimination complaint (for factual precedents I might look to lawsuits between warring Hasidic factions) but it appears to fulfill the criteria.

The most obvious legal question I can see is going to what basis Thorburn terminated its relationship with the Fairmans, as there's only circumstantial evidence offered up at this stage, but I imagine it's going to be very difficult for Thorburn to come up with a basis that doesn't reek of a post-hoc pretext to avoid the real reason, about which I have little difficultly assuming the Fairmans are right (is there really any doubt though? Again, this sort of discrimination has been going on for decades without reprisal).

Thorburn will be hard pressed to allege that the termination was due to some other basis because other Thorburn employees can be interviewed and it'll be near-impossible for them to get their pretext stories all straight. It also doesn't help Thorburn that the termination letter was sent to both Michael and Joy, meaning that the basis -- whatever they come up with -- would have to explain why she can't treat them both; it might be easier to come up with an explanation that Thorburn had, say, a personal falling out with one or the other.

The other way Thorburn's defense might go is to say, "Yeah, I discriminated but only because the First Amendment grants me the religious freedom to discriminate. Disconnection is an important Scientology doctrine and the law cannot force me to be exposed to suppressive persons because it would harm my case and threaten my eternity." Which isn't that unlike the argument relied upon by Christian pharmacists who refuse to prescribe the morning-after pill. The problem for Thorburn, if she chooses to go this route, is that the Fairmans aren't just SPs but also members of a protected religious class as Independent Scientologists. A judge will be wary of the case coming down to picking a winner between two religious groups; and especially if it means picking the one clearly violating the law.

For a long time I've promoted the idea of an Independent Scientologist suit against the IRS for disparately favoring Church of Scientology auditing deductions over Independent Scientologist auditing deductions (assuming the IRS rejected the latter), so I'm pleased to see the Fairmans take a similar route in alleging discrimination by a Church of Scientology member. Perhaps this will open the minds of other Independent Scientologists and prompt creative ways to legally redress the legal benefits uniquely and unfairly bestowed upon the Church of Scientology and its members only.

Well, that's a densely packed final paragraph from Scott, but we have, indeed, discussed this before -- the fact that members of the Church of Scientology enjoy special status with the federal government which allows them to deduct the cost of their auditing.

This was challenged by a Jewish couple who felt that they should be able to deduct the cost of religious schooling for their children under the same principle. Their case lasted 15 years, until the Supreme Court declined to hear it in 2009, preserving the special deduction only for Scientologists.

But if Scientologists enjoy special status, then why shouldn't that status also be enjoyed by independent Scientologists, who also ascribe to L. Ron Hubbard's ideas, do similar auditing, and would probably also like to deduct the cost of that auditing from their taxes? If a court agreed to that, it would give independent Scientologists a boost -- and nothing, seriously nothing, would irritate church leader David Miscavige more, we figure.

Now, Fairman has found a similar test in a simpler setting. Taking nothing away from his discrimination claim, which is pretty basic -- either Thorburn cut Fairman off because he was declared an SP or she didn't -- it's no accident, it seems to me, that Rathbun is mentioned in the lawsuit, as well as this line from page 9...

Defendants Thorburn Chiropractic and Dr. Thorburn unambiguously discriminated against Plaintiffs for the express reason that Plantiffs are members of a class of persons who practice their religion, including Scientology, but not Scientology as applied by the Church of Scientology -- and for that reason they are protected by the Unruh Civil Rights Act.

And there's another reason why I think the "independent" angle is, for the Fairmans, an important part of this case: just days before this lawsuit became public, Fairman made a very public (and oddly timed, I thought then) declaration that he was now definitely back with Rathbun in the "indie" scene after previously walking away from it.

Fairman had seemed like a pretty typical case: after coming out of the church, he was outraged at the way it is currently being run by leader David Miscavige, as you can see from an interview we did with him in April. Like others who have been leaving the church in droves in the last few years, he walked away from the organization but not the ideas in it. Such "independents" -- many of them rallying around Rathbun -- continue to audit and otherwise practice Scientology outside the official confines of Miscavige's organization.

And, like some others who come out as indies, Fairman then also gradually dropped Hubbard's ideas and put away Scientology itself.

Then, on Friday, at Rathbun's blog, Fairman published a statement, saying that he was back in the indie fold.

"I never wanted to look an e-meter in the face again because of what a drudge it had become," he writes, explaining that after initially enjoying his time with Rathbun last year, he had gradually put away Hubbard's technology. But then, recently, he decided to give it another shot, and planned another trip to see Rathbun.

"I decided on one more go-around with 'the Tech' and made plans for a trip to Texas," he writes. And now, he's back to the Hubbard way of thinking: "Those who disparage Hubbard's technology, for whatever reason, no longer have any significance for me."

Now that the lawsuit has been made public, the timing of Friday's statement makes a lot more sense.

Having declared that he's still an independent Scientologist, Fairman will ask a court to decide that David Miscavige's church cannot discriminate -- using its notorious disconnection policy -- against Scientologists who have left the official church.

And this could get very interesting.


Tony Ortega is the editor-in-chief of The Village Voice. Since 1995, he's been writing about Scientology at several publications.

tortega@villagevoice.com | @VoiceTonyO | Facebook: Tony Ortega

Keep up on all of our New York news coverage at this blog, Runnin' Scared


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114 comments
chiropractic marketing
chiropractic marketing

You should to accept their plan to be able to apperceive what you should expect. Keep in apperception that a Chiropractor does not amusement diseases and illnesses anatomize but about advice the accommodating by acceptable their physique attain and sustain a bigger and bigger bloom level.

chiropractor bethlehem
chiropractor bethlehem

All too often, the very people who suffer from headaches the most, know the least about treating them.  These at home tips should help the next time you find  yourself suffering from a headache.

chiropractor bethlehem
chiropractor bethlehem

All too often, the very people who suffer from headaches the most, know the least about treating them.  These at home tips should help the next time you find  yourself suffering from a headache.

OTVIIIisGrrr8!
OTVIIIisGrrr8!

We in RTC decline to comment on this utterly frivilous lawsuit. 

Jgg
Jgg

  The irony of the indie movement is that it does make Scientology seem like a real religion.

KeepOnLearning
KeepOnLearning

Oh, those litigious ex-Scientologists. They're at it again!

The reason the chiropractor notified Fairman of no further service was NOT BECAUSE Fairman  is no longer a Scientologist. 

It was because Fairman openly attacked the chiropractor's church! Who wants someone like that in their office? 

THAT is the reason his sleazy suit will fail. 

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

"I decided on one more go-around with 'the Tech' and made plans for a trip to Texas," he writes. And now, he's back to the Hubbard way of thinking: "Those who disparage Hubbard's technology, for whatever reason, no longer have any significance for me."

Yes, its called disconnection. Kind of hypocritical to be suing someone because they decided to have essentially the same lack of significance.

Strelnikov
Strelnikov

I've heard it takes twelve years to fully recover from Scientology, and until Mr. Fairman drops Scn, he will be lurching back and forth between the hard core and the agnostic. He needs to get out of the amusement park.

Speaking of Holy Rollers, the reason why I brought up those three pitiful examples of Christian Fundamentalism a few comments ago was to remind every one who participates here that the crazed, authoritarian, and sleazy lunacy which Tony Ortega reports on in this blog, also happens outside of the crumbling "empire" of Scientology. In fact, I would say it's slightly worse in Fundieland because those churches are given a pass because they are "real" form of religion while Scientology is percieved to be something wacky rich and famous people do. It also does not help that, unlike the Catholic Church and its priests, there is no system to monitor pastors. It's happened more than once that disgraced pastors have quit, moved to another state, then gone back into the ministry. Worse is if they can blackmail the victims into silence, and that's happened a lot as well. What these Protestant offshoots need is transparency, the same thing people are trying to bring to Scientology.

Mimsey Borogrove
Mimsey Borogrove

"Let's say Fairman loses. Is the cult really going to want to raise the public's awareness of this case? That if a member chooses to leave, all their professional associates will disconnect from them? I'm just trying to figure out how they could frame this to their advantage, should they win." How did they win by their Freedom Magazine article on Paul Haggis? They got to say"neener neener, you can't hurt me!" That is how the Church will respond, but the poor Chiros - they will be defending themselves, and possibly get token lowers unless they do a bunch more donos. Possibly they will get dumped by their insurance carriers, or have to pay higher rates.

They were fools to put their religous beliefs in front of common sense.

MarkStark
MarkStark

But Mim, Haggis leaving and speaking out was not a court case, and I'd call what they did in Freedumb "damage control" rather than a win. It was a huge flop. They were making utter fools out of themselves, and I'm not sure that it was successful inside the cult either. It just drew more attention to Paul Haggis, their star who defected over a year before.

On the other hand, what they did to TIME (The Behar article and ensuing litigation which scared off journalists for years), Wollersheim, and Lisa McPherson, were wins inside the cult. They made the very best they could out of potentially devastating situations. They were able to do this, partly because of not having the Internet.

With Lisa, they raised large amount of money for the cult defense. With Wollersheim, there were large Scilon rallies for justice, "not one thin dime for..."

This is a tiny case in comparison. But who knows. Because it involves a celebrity, it could have a bigger impact.

MarkStark
MarkStark

Let's say Fairman wins, which I hope he does. The Indie Scilons can then legitimize their movement, so that as more people leave the cult, ones who join the Indies can have a precedent for their cases, against Scilon employers for example, if their employer wants to fire them for being an SP.

In that way, people in the cult, who are afraid of leaving because they would leave a job they like with a Scilon employer, won't have to be as afraid.

Scilons can't do a Freedumb issue about everything. For example, I predict no issue about the SP Times series on regging. They do it enough as it is, without calling any further attention to it by mocking or defaming people who put their foot down, and said ENOUGH. Enough of getting regged and enough of regging others.

I wonder how much of the membership actually read Freedumb. By featuring stars like Haggis, or even Fairman in Freedumb the cult is risking a lot. Scilons look up to their celebrities. Just as teens drooled over Elvis, Scilons (of all ages) adore ALL their celebrities and rich people too.

While celebrities such as Christopher Reeve (and many others) tried the cult for a while, and never went back, they were ignored. Now, with Haggis, Beghe and any other celeb who associates with Marty, they don't ignore them anymore.

However, I don't think they are following Haggis. They can't risk creeping him out to the point he turns into a vocal activist. They'd like to push Beghe, so they could put him in jail, but he's onto them.

This particular story with Fairman, might make some of the Scichiros nervous. Not so much about their insurance rates, but about the possibility of having to disconnect from an SP, have it get in the papers, and having EVERYONE (all their other patients) read that their chiro Dr. Backcracker is a member of crazy cult.

MarkStark
MarkStark

I agree. Haggis wasn't a star in the cult community. I knew who he was, and was shocked to find out he was a Scilon. To them, he wasn't a star, because he was never cute or an actor, nor did he direct or write a blockbuster type of Hollywood film.

As far as his level of accomplishment, relative to the type of things Scientology would pretend to foster in a person, he was probably the most accomplished the cult has had in its history. If Jenna Elfman looked like Nancy Cartwright, she probably never would have gotten an acting role. In other words, Sciloontology has nothing to do with the looks of these actors.

Let's wait until Wright's book comes out though. If some ditz like Elfman left the cult, Wright NEVER would have written about it. He was fascinated, inspired, and perplexed by the idea of a writer/director like Haggis, for being in a space cult for decades. I felt the same.

Mimsey Borogrove
Mimsey Borogrove

You know, I don't think many Scios read the Freedom mag anyway. I was bringing the point up about Haggis to a Scio and her response was" He wasn't contributing to the IAS" See, my take on that response, is that they black PR'd him in the cult, so it didn't matter if he had a valid reason for writing the letter to Tommy, he was disaffected in her eyes.

The stars the Scios mainly like are Cruise, Kirsty, Travolta, Jenna, and the next tier is all of the B list stars and musicians.  I doubt they are aware of Haggis as a star despite of his acadamy awards.

I think Freedom is just David M.'s soapbox to mouth off at his detractors.  Calling people Kingpin, Adultress and the cartoon of Haggis catching flys etc. is just juveinile enough to fit his personality.

As to the lawsuit, my guess is they will settle. The insurance co won't want to pay for a battle they can't win. Better to cut their losses and run. If the Fairman's get the HIPAA stirred up, that could be expensive if there was a violation of patient / dr confidentiality. More likely, there was no discussion of their medical records - just a heads up from Lisa which won't stick.  A tempest in a tea pot...

Mimsey

MarkStark
MarkStark

What has made Tom Cruise so successful, and such a high level Novo-Peenie? What makes the muskrat guard his musk?

HE DOESN'T ALLOW SPs IN HIS VICINITY! SPs will steal your musk (theta).

A Scichiro who works on an SP like Fairman, could go from cracking a back, to breaking one, and she'd lose her musk. He's better off with a wogchiro, or a squirchiro, a being more at his tone level.

The tone level of the SP cannot be raised because he has stopped buying into the scam. This is the purest form of entheta, straight from the darkest jungle of the gorilla goals accompanying the Helatrobus Implant. Read a book!

MarkStark
MarkStark

Michael Fairman should sue for pain and suffrage -- the right to vote Marty Rathbun in as the new President and Chairman of the Board of Sciloontology.

Marty could ally with Rael and turn the Sea Org into the Sea Orgy. No prison camps! Unlimited masturbation rights! The word "back" dropped from the Sea Org motto.

All these ostentatious new buildings would be razed to the ground and auditing would be given in people's homes or rooms that could be rented by the hour, as Tennessee Williams would say.

No more taking out loans for donations or courses. You get regged down to your last penny and that's the limit. Hubbard would have wanted it that way.

Sid
Sid

Mark you are a genius. "The word "back" dropped from the Sea Org motto."

MarkStark
MarkStark

Thank you Sid. Now if Hollywood would come a callin'... A few times, I've run into people from high school, decades ago, who remember things I said. It's pretty funny.

Xenu
Xenu

That's all well and fine, so long as they don't publish any of the Touch Assist with Happy Ending™ technology, which is claimed as a trade secret of the Temple of Xenu (a Reform Church of Scientology).

Xenu
Xenu

Let the "I believe some of Hubbard" absurdities begin!

Ever since the IRS singled out Scientology for "most favored religion" status, I've wondered how long it could be before others started cashing in.  The Sklar case delayed things for quite a while, but now the floodgates are opening.

Let's suppose that, as hypothetical founder of a reformed Scientology church, I choose as my core belief Hubbard's statement, "If anything I tell you, or have ever told you, is discovered to differ from the individual observation, be it a good observation, then it isn’t true!  It doesn’t matter whether I said it was true or not.  Do you understand?” (lecture of 15 July '57).  That's a Hubbard teaching that I believe, and many could believe, although it leaves the door open for the rejection of any and all other Hubbard teachings.  Hubbard's writings and lectures were riddled enough with contradictions that anyone alive could surely seize on some statement or another and proclaim oneself a Reform Scientologist, presumably eligible for the the IRS' maximum bounty.  This puts the tax and judicial systems in the position of having to decide what is, and is not, Scientology.  The courts would hate that, and my guess is that they'd respond by nullifying Scientology's special exemptions.Now if you'll excuse me, I think I need to go dust off my minister's credentials.

Sid
Sid

 Yeah, at MY "First United Church of Independent Terminals" (FUCIT) I'm going to be supplying free electrical goods alongside my very brief online auditing sessions.

So, your tax free dollars could get you an iPad or a camera for very reasonable voluntary donations.

Tye Solaris
Tye Solaris

It was Bill Clinton that bestowed "most favored religion" status.

Strelnikov
Strelnikov

In America, this is how cults end: everybody sues each other, the organization implodes, and the guru tries to flee the country or can never come back. And even without the suit going to court, the threat alone can end the insanity; this is why Werner Erhart no longer runs his seminars and has retired from public life. 

However, I can name a number of fundamentalist Christian pastors who carried on the sleaze despite legal threats or public exposure: Jack Hyles, who made an employee's wife his mistress for ten years; the kooky John Todd, who made bizarre Satanic-conspiracy claims in the 1970s; and the ultrasleeze himself, Tony Alamo, who is in jail for having child brides, polygamy, and general rape.

a volunteer? yeah
a volunteer? yeah

The elephant in the room is "Why are these guys turning to and being practices other than dianetics and scientology. In dianetics statements are made that engrams cause all conditions but cancer and diabetes has not been researched yet. we have touch assists, nerve assists. OTs are supposed to be able to alter there skeletil and endocrine system. OT 5 - well one is enticed onto it with an LRHED which says cancer stems from 2D outnesses - soyou jump at it, then the allergy (asthma) rundown - i see people still with asthma - need more!!! and high level old OTs and Class 8s even who are bent over with arthritis. so the elephant in the room is - why are these guys relying on other practices, they should only be an adjunct - used per the OEC vol 5 references on medical liason officr. medical until the guy shows signs of getting well - then off it and onto auditing, if you can afford more than the CS53

MarkStark
MarkStark

The answer is pretty simple. None of that tech shit works, except on some simple things that probably would have gotten better without it.

However, the chiro-Scilon alliance is quite lucrative for both groups. The chiros get the Scilon patients, give kick-backs to the cult through WISE or other donations. As another poster mentioned, the healing power of a Sci-chiro is legendary.

They can combine the connectivity of the touch assist, with their preternatural OT powerz (brain beans, time shifts, telekinesis, money-sucking, chain smoking, projectile vomiting etc.), throw in massage and the usual manipulation and it is no longer regular chiropractic, it is Sciropractic.  It is magickal. Just ask any of the Fairmans. They can't live without their Sciropractor.

Imagine the Sciropractor's power to perform a time shift, and deluxate the patient to a time period before their back (or other spine-related parts and organs) became subluxed.

Have you ever seen Scilons hoisting huge trophies above their heads, things they get for screwing a record number of people out of their life savings, and other accomplishments? That takes a toll on the back.

Scilons LOVE Sciropractic, because unlike the tech, it really works sometimes. It's the future of Sciloontology I tell you!

bobx
bobx

It's sort of like the Vulcan nerve-pinch, but unfortunately, it can have the side-effect of turning into a Spock mind-meld, and that's the real reason the scripractor can't treat an SP anymore, he'll catch entheta.  Ooops, I revealed the secret to wogs who are not prepared, so now you'll probably die of pneumonia.  Oh well, that helps to clear the planet!

bobx
bobx

What do you mean, Star Trek was more realistic???  When they show shots of the Enterprise, it doesn't look much at all like a real DC-8!

MarkStark
MarkStark

I grew up reading Mad Magazine. They had a feature Spy vs. Spy. All of Mad was satire though. Sciloontology is "Mad" come to life, especially with the schism between the mother cult and squirrels. They have these Operations and Projects they are launching against the enemy. Squirrel Busters vs. Marty Rathbun and his unregulated emeter and cult-damaged followers. Marty vs. Miscavige.

Miscavige stunned them with his reverse-Dianetics brain beams and command intention super powerz. Marty Rathbun was in a frozen stupor, a Sea Org slave to his master Miscavige for decades, but is now unleashing REAL Hubbard OT super powerz FOR THE FIRST TIME, since Miscavige grabbed power.

Before Miscavige, everyone in Hubbard's time had super powerz, and incredible healing abilities. No abuse at all. Marty's followers have all had the Hubbard abuse engram removed from their reactive minds.

Star Trek is a good comparison too, although the "science" in Star Trek is probably more realistic and sophisticated than anything Hubbard imagined. This is factual.

SP 'Onage
SP 'Onage

I'm curious. Maybe Marty put Michael up to this? Was this lawsuit hatched at Casa blanca during Michael's holiday visit with Marty?

If Marty is one of the players that suggested this lawsuit? DM will be gunning extra hard at Michael using every dirty trick in the scilon handbook.

S. P.
S. P.

If the Fairmans are being discriminated against because they left the COS that is a case of religious discrimination. If the Fairmans are being discriminated because they left the COS and ALSO because they are independent Scientologists that is worse and a case of both positive and negative discrimination. 

Therefore if it is true that the Fairmans are independent Scientologists and their being independents is likely to be at least part of the reason they are being discriminated against it is necessary and prudent for the Fairmans to bring that fact up in the lawsuit.

The "Independent Scientologist" talk and the mention of Rathbun are thus fully explained, without resorting to the superfluous "legitimizing Scientology" explanation.

Torychristman
Torychristman

Way to go, Michael, and Tony for this article and info from Attorney Scott!

I have had Scientologists (from the "church" of $cientology) discriminate against me (refusing to serve me, refusing to give me a job) due to being an "SP". Is there a "Statute of Limitations" on Discrimination? This should be VERY interesting! I think he'll win, but at the worst, it shines the light on these phony "religious" (quack!) people, in disguise as "so nice"---when they actually are supporting a  "mafia-like organization". (Not my quote: Google Scientology+Judges and learn what THEY say about these creeps). To those still "in"? WtFU! Happy Holidays, Tony, all at the VV and to ALL speaking out :) Peace! Tory/Magoo

anon anon song
anon anon song

Imagine that, one little disconnection throws an entire religious tolerance argument tech out the window.

StabbyMcStoo
StabbyMcStoo

I agree.  This lolsuit will provide the critics with important ammo on the One Trick Pony response of "you are a religious bigot" argument coming from any screaming Scientologist.  If they love their religious freedom so much, why are they discriminating against someone for their own religious beliefs?

I believe that the tech itself is harmful, but I applaud this effort.  The best way to dismantle this destructive organization is by using Scientology's own best weapon, the legal system. 

MarkStark
MarkStark

It is still a Catch 22 though. Will it boil down to: Fairman was in the cult first? And he should abide by their "sacred" doctrine/policy of SPs and entheta?

The "religious discrimination" is just their PR, like they would claim that a person of any religion can be a Scilon and find their original faith strengthened by the "tools" and concepts they learn. As if it is edifying for a Christian to find out that Jesus is an implant.

Jgg
Jgg

  Remember, when you see someone who needs a chiropractor--it's not like anything else--you know you are the only person who can help them.

anon anon song
anon anon song

Hmm, scientology and chiropractors... homeopathy can't be far behind.

If I had Michael Fairman over for dinner, there'd be such an awkward silence.  

However, I am open to a friendly debate on humankind as simply materialized color operating on the 49th vibration. You would make that conclusion walking down the street or going to the store. *W-I-N-C*

John P.
John P.

This saturated energy is the basis of all creation. 

Loved Mighty Wind, thanks for finding a wonderfully appropriate comment in one of my favorite flicks.  

Pretty Little Robot
Pretty Little Robot

Nice. (I didn't want you to think your Mighty Wind reference went unnoticed and unappreciated.)

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

Few people love a lawsuit against any scientology entity better than me but I must say that the last thing we need is Scientology being "verified" by another court decree as being legitimate.

I guess Michael Fairman popped this lawsuit off while still in a big win from his recovery back to Independent Scientology with Marty. Lucky for Marty. Not so lucky for those who thought we had another fish out of the polluted water.

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

I just want to add that, yes, this discrimination is wrong; and that people should sue when it happens - especially those who are not part of the church anymore. Disconnection sucks and it a rightful target to attack the methods and sources of its implementation. However, anything that legitimizes Scientology as a religion, to me, is not helpful to the cause of trying to get its tax exemption recinded and the organization shut it down.

There are other lawsuits claiming discrimination against WISE companies which I think are much more important but I can appreciate what the Fairman family is trying to fight here. I just don't like that the outcome would further legitimize scientology as a religion.

MarkStark
MarkStark

Scientology gets a lot of mileage out one ruling, or one academic who wants to say they are a legitimate religion, or that the psychiatry is riddled with corruption and causes harm, or that all apostates lie.

Let's say Fairman loses. Is the cult really going to want to raise the public's awareness of this case? That if a member chooses to leave, all their professional associates will disconnect from them? I'm just trying to figure out how they could frame this to their advantage, should they win.

Even inside the cult, I don't see how they could use it very well. Too many people starting out, might be alarmed if they learned about such rulings.

Scientology's legitimacy is crumbling because of their behavior, and the "secrets" (that are no longer secret) that they withhold about basic doctrine (Xenu) simply to extract money from people. They still have billions of dollars to fool and entice people, and I just don't see how a case like this, brought against an individual, would help them, even if they win. The cult is headed into a lot of lose/lose situations, because of the web. Stories like Brian Culkin's. Stuff they got away with for years.

Tell us specifically the way they could use this, with their members or the public, to legitimize themselves. I can't think of any. You probably can because you understand this aspect better.

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

Either way this case goes, if a decision is made by the court on it instead of a jury making a decision after trial,  that decision sets precedent or validates other court decisions as noted by the court in its reasoning for its decision. Lawyers then use that decision in its arguements for decisions or cause of claims. Thats how the law works from my limited undertstanding of it.

sketto
sketto

So, let me get this straight. A bunch of former Scientologists who used to help disconnect families, put people in RPF prison and generally promote a seriously unhealthy way of treating other humans in this world are now suing current Scientologists who still practice all that? Do I have that right?

Here's hoping that they all litigate each other into oblivion.

Tye Solaris
Tye Solaris

Does anyone know what the Fairman's were paying this chiropractor..

I understand that it was likely billed to an insurance company, but I am wondering what the "rate" was.... hourly, procedure, session?

MarkStark
MarkStark

Theta-realignment - $240BT Cluster Re-Positioning - $185 Ea.(A Scientologist can have a lot of painful subluxing dead space alien clusters in the spinal region and only a Sci-chiro can relux them properly, for later removal at an Org.)

Jgg
Jgg

Theta-realignment - $240BT Cluster Re-Positioning - $185 Ea.Seeing scibots sue each other into oblivion--priceless.  There are some things money can't buy.  For everything else, there's Mastercard.

Tye Solaris
Tye Solaris

Funny...

I can recall how OT Chiro's were so important... because they were "Clears" & OT's ... so just by being in a closed room with them.... made you 'All Better'... 

Definitely, worth TWICE the price of a WOG Chiro.... maybe Three Times..

MarkStark
MarkStark

It is definitely a business, acting and social networking club.

Reminds me of an OT couple who got declared, only to come home and find their kitchen appliances would no longer work.They had a very upscale OT stainless steel subzero refrigerator. Had to replace it with a 1964 avocado green Kelvinator that sounded like a snowmobile. It was the only thing that would work for them, 'cause they were SPs.

They got the same appliance package Xenu uses in his mountain prison, everything mismatched and hauled out of a dump, not OT at all.

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

They should have included WISE in this lawsuit because WISE most certainly influenced this member to disconnect from SPs

Tye Solaris
Tye Solaris

Yep.... Cross Selling .... was and still is the order of day.

I know that Sci-Chiro's required their patients to come-in more frequently for treatments and procedures.... just another way to increase the cash flow...

It created quite a controversy amongst the wog chiro's AND the insurance companies.

MarkStark
MarkStark

Wouldn't surprise me at all. A Sci-accountant, now an ex, said he used to make $200/hour. In addition to fees, the Sci-chiro probably makes you donate to the WISE business fund or something.

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