How Scientology Drives Your Local Librarian Nuts

Categories: Scientology

FrustratedLibrarian.jpg
[Credit: L.E. Baskow, Portland Tribune]
We've been hearing pretty regularly from librarians near and far who have had it with the aggressive tactics of Scientology.

You see, as we learned Sunday with a story about "study tech," Scientology is like an octopus that wants to get its tentacles into as many places as possible through front groups and supposedly "secular" entities. So Scientology pushes L. Ron Hubbard's study materials into unsuspecting school districts, recruits kids to stand up for uncontroversial "human rights," runs drug treatment centers with non-medical personnel and unscientific vitamins-and-sauna regimens, sends "volunteer ministers" to disaster sites to wave their hands over people claiming to heal them, and all of it with the real goal of burnishing the image of Scientology's founder L. Ron Hubbard, and, ultimately, Scientology itself.

But no one may be more fed up with Scientology's pushy Hubbard-PR than this country's librarians.

We hear from librarians from time to time about how Scientologists never take no for an answer and insist on sending them books they don't want. But recently, we heard from a Detroit-area librarian, Alan Naldrett, and felt compelled to share his story with you...

Scientology has a campaign to get their literature into libraries. Through Bridge Publications, they send out packages containing numerous Scientology materials, both books and DVDs. They then follow up with phone calls to see if the libraries received the items and shelved them. In our library the phone calls are usually forwarded to me, one of the reference librarians.

When I first talked to Bridge Publications I told them we were not interested in their books as they did not have scientific research available to verify their claims. Also, there was no peer review involved, that is, the books were not checked over by anyone qualified to verify the claims, such as a scientist or philosopher.

The employee assured me that there was research done by Mr. Hubbard and she would send it. What she sent me was testimonials to the scientific acumen of Mr. Hubbard, including the nuclear physicist bit. After I explained that this wasn't "research," and what I wanted to see was how many people were sampled in the surveys and how many were in the control group, and other examples of using a scientific method. I offered to e-mail her an example so she could see what most of the free world considers "research." I never heard from her again.

About every six months to a year, the whole process starts over. I did an e-mail search and there have been more than ten different people over the years calling and e-mailing trying to get their books into our library. One variation is to just promote L. Ron Hubbard's science fiction stories, with no mention of Scientology. The websites for this are quite folksy, kind of reminding me of sites that sell old radio shows...

GalaxyPress4.JPG

That website includes a bio of L. Ron Hubbard with no mention of Scientology or Dianetics whatsoever (they must not want to alienate the librarians and science-fiction fans).

No matter how many times we tell them to please don't send any more crap, they keep sending boxes of material.

Alan included a copy of a typical letter he received from Bridge Publications, Scientology's publishing arm...

Dear Librarian,

I work for a company and have a set of audio CDs that I would like to donate to your library. They are newly released and just becoming available to the bookstores. These come in individual plastic cases that are shelf-ready.

There are 26 individual lectures covering a variety of subjects such as: Family and Children, Money, Increasing Efficiency, Study and Education, the Mind, the Soul, Hope, Help and more.

I want to best facilitate your library's needs in accepting these donations and so would appreciate it if you'd spend a moment and write back to me on the following:

1. Would you want all 26 titles in one mailing (one small box)?
2. Would they be shelved by subject or by author?
3. Is there any other information you would need to accept these as part of your collection?

Thank you very much for your time.

Sincerely,
Denise Whitta
Research/Planning
Bridge Publications, Inc.

Alan also included the survey that he filled out and returned, with his responses in italics...

Dear Librarian,

In an effort to better understand how libraries catalog and select audio/visual materials for their collection, Bridge Publications would greatly appreciate the completion of the following short survey.

What are the key factors considered in evaluating audio-visual for selection and shelving?

We mainly have audiovisual for faculty only and don't need anything about Scientology, so please don't send anything.

Do you shelf all the AV material you acquire?

No, especially not the Scientology ones.

What audio/visual properties makes (sic) them undesirable to put on the shelving?

Ones with no scientific research or backing noted, with no peer review process (clear that if you're not sure what I mean) or ones from repressive organizations.

Does the packaging need any specific information?

It must not say Scientology or Dianetics.

Does your library acquire AV self- help material?

Yes, but only actual, peer-reviewed items.

Is their (sic, they didn't clear this word either) any cataloging information we can provide that might facilitate the shelving process?

Just don't send any materials and that will help us by not having to throw them out again.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

We have had your books on the shelf, no one checks them out. We put them in our book sale, no one buys them. We put them in the free box, no one wants them. So we give them to recyclers who give the money to the disadvantaged. You could skip the middle man and directly donate to an anti-hunger organization not connected to Scientology since that's what we would do. Or just don't send any more materials.

Thank you for your time. It is greatly appreciated.

Nicole Shell
Research Officer
Bridge Publications

Alan says he gets other letters that promote Hubbard, each one focusing on a different area of his output.

Another librarian we know sent us this note about a similar campaign to get Hubbard's pulp fiction into a college library, and sent us a copy of the e-mail he was sent...

GalaxyPress1.JPG

Wrote the librarian, "This e-mail campaign is bothersome, since it paints librarians as witless accomplices in the campaign for global domination..."

Well, we've yet to meet a librarian who is witless. So maybe even more of them will think to answer Scientology's endless campaigns with smart-aleck responses like the ones Alan came up with.

We'd like to hear from other librarians about how they've handled similar entreaties from Bridge Publications or Galaxy Press. Let us know!


**********
Tony Ortega has been the editor in chief of the Village Voice since March, 2007. He started writing about Scientology in 1995. You can reach him by e-mail at tortega@villagevoice.com, and if you ask nicely he'll put you on his mailing list for notifications of new stories, which tend to come out each and every morning at 8 am, but can suddenly appear at any time of the day. You can also catch his alerts at Twitter (@VoiceTonyO), at his Facebook author page, and even this new Google Plus doohickey.

New readers might want to check out our primer, "What is Scientology?" Another good overview is our series from last summer, "Top 25 People Crippling Scientology." At the top of every story, you'll see the "Scientology" category which, if you click on it, will bring up all of our most recent stories. As for our regular features, on Thursdays we do a roundup of world press, on Fridays we visit L. Ron Hubbard on the yacht Apollo circa 1969-1971, on Saturdays we celebrate the week's best comments, and on Sundays we publish Scientology's wacky and tacky advertising mailers that people send us.

As for hot subjects we've covered here, you may have heard about Debbie Cook, the former church official who rebelled and is now being sued by Scientology. You might have also heard about the Super Power Building, Scientology's "Mecca," whose secrets were revealed here. We also reported how Scientology spied on its own most precious object, Tom Cruise. (We wrote Tom an open letter that he has yet to respond to.) Have you seen a Scientology ad on TV lately? We debunked some of the claims in that 2-minute commercial you might have seen while watching Glee or American Idol.

Other stories have looked at Scientology's policy of "disconnection" that is tearing families apart. You may also have heard something about the Sea Org experiences of the Paris sisters, Valeska and Melissa, and their friend Ramana Dienes-Browning. We've also featured Paulette Cooper, who wrote about Scientology back in the day, and Janet Reitman, Hugh Urban, and the team at the Tampa Bay Times, who write about it today. And there's plenty more coming.


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363 comments
Stoccolm
Stoccolm

 ONE IMPORTANT THING IS TO BE AWARE THAT SCINTOLOGY "sends "volunteer ministers" to disaster sites to wave their hands over people claiming to heal them, and all of it with the real goal of burnishing the image of Scientology's founder L. Ron Hubbard, and, ultimately, Scientology itself" ......  That's is why they use to dress yellow staff when they do such disaster helping. If you wanna help somebody you don't need that everybody can see your religion or setta...

ShellyMiscavige
ShellyMiscavige

They wear yellow because it is the color of a coward.

cultwatch
cultwatch

Check out this Baby Walker video, where they use one of their rugrats to solicit donations, for library books (that no-one wants)

www.scientology-london.Zcom/brum/babywalker/(replace Zcom with com)

Andrew0261W
Andrew0261W

We get 'em, too, 'round here in the boondocks of the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of the Commonwealth of Virginia...   We "catalog" 'em in "the [proverbial] circular file"!   What a waste!  I tried watching one myself: They're usually well-crafted, and try to be "o, so, common-sense."   But one was enough 4 me!   Thanks for the article!   Good to see I'm not alone!   Fortunately, I haven't gotten too many calls from them...  The few I got, I just dismissed on account of our collection development policy and limited budge!!!t 

media_lush
media_lush

I wonder if the cover of Battleship Earth shown here was any way something to do with John Travolta choosing to make that awful film of the same name....... just sayin'

Jgg
Jgg

  I did a little research at our library.  From 1995-2002, one Hubbard book (The Creation of Human Ability) was checked out 20 times.  Since 2002, however, that book plus 2 others have been signed out a total of 3 times.  It appears that the internet has power.

Andrew Porter
Andrew Porter

One of the best things about no longer publishing my magazine SCIENCE FICTION CHRONICLE (which ceased publication in 2006; I sold it in 2000)  is that I no longer had to be nice to, nor in fact interact in any way, with Bridge Publications or their minions. I also found a good way to get them to drop their proselytizing: just say "As a psychiatrist, ...". They will flee in terror.

B Tarkington
B Tarkington

If Scientologists seriously wanted to make their books and CDs freely available to the General Public, then there's a much more effective way to do it. Why go to all the trouble and expense of manufacturing and shipping bulky physical items to libraries that don't want them? Why not just post the same material online at an attractive website where it can be freely downloaded in seconds by any interested party?

I can easily read or search the Bhagavad-Gita at no cost, and at any time or place, using a 4G wireless internet connection (hat tip to the Hare Krishnas). The Gita is thousands of years old, and the most elaborate technology that it describes is the horsedrawn chariot, yet today it is readily available via the latest 21st Century dissemination tech.

So how come Scientology's tech is so primitive by comparison? Printing physical books and shipping them to libraries might have been the best way to make ideas freely available -- prior to the 20th Century.

MarkStark
MarkStark

 No one would read Hubbard's crap if it were free. Rich people think that the more they pay for courses and books, the more they must "work." Director/writer Paul Haggis was in this cult for over three decades and never read Dianetics, calling it "impenetrable."

They make a lot of money selling Hubbard's crappy books to people who walk into a brainwashing Org and think they have secrets. But that is nothing compared to what they sell to members. They wanted one wealthy member to buy 50 sets of The Basics at $3000/set. They also make members buy them for libraries, who throw them away.

They make a lot of money selling Hubbard's books each year, but not to the public.

However, you are perfectly right in thinking that if they really want to "save the planet," they should publish electronically. They used to claim costs of publication as the big reason they couldn't give Dianutty away. They want people to buy Dianutty, find it curious or puzzling, then come in for $300,000 worth of brainwashing.

Amazon was selling 2 to 3 copies of Dianutty a week.

If you're interested in learning about Hubbard's unbelievable life and how he started this fake religion to suck money out of the gullible, you can read Russell Miller's Barefaced Messiah. It is online free in a few different formats.

tpjil
tpjil

No matter how you feel about Scientology or how you personally assess the validity of its scientific merit, whatever happened to Freedom to Read? Remember this ..."It is in the public interest for publishers and librarians to make Available the widest diversity of views and expressions, including those that are unorthodox, unpopular, or considered dangerous by the majority" As far as I am concerned most libraries could add a title or two of this 'free" material and allow patrons to make up their own minds .

Alan Naldrett
Alan Naldrett

 As noted in the article, the "free" stuff was on the shelf first and NEVER got checked out. The Patrons Have Spoken!

California
California

What amazed me last year, when I called to many educational/academic libraries in California about another matter and got to chatting with the head researcher/head librarian about this phenomenon, was that every single institution told me that they get boxes of Scientology stuff, annually or more often.  The librarians/purchasing offices, etc.,  have told the sending party that they cannot accept the books and yet they keep on coming.  One exasperated librarian told me that although SCN has been told repeatedly that there is limited staff/limited shelf space (due to the economy and the cut-backs) and the priority goes to professors who request space for books that they recommend, they keep on sending the boxes.

"Don't they get it?" another one asked me.  I replied, "Nope, the staff people have to meet ridiculous quotas within impossible time-lines and you are listed, somewhere, as a happy purchaser who wants more books, is my best guess."

John Constantine
John Constantine

Neil Gaiman acts as a Scientology front group who tries to appear as a secular entity, while feeding millions into the cult. The Scientologists ran a scam through Gaiman to drain Minnesota libraries of their funds, alienating the local government which resulted in Matt Dean calling Gaiman out as a "Thieving Weasel."

Gaiman's fee went straight to Scientology. 

tpjil
tpjil

  And why do you care?   Your objection toGaiman's work seems to lead to the idea that librarians should be in therole of deciding what is good or bad for the patrons. Or said another waypatrons can’t figure things out for themselves; so we selectors of materialsneed to step in and protect them from this great Scientology conspiracy. I forone feel that each patron is more than empowered to make an informed decisionon what to take home and whether the material is of merit. The role theselector should play is to ensure that on any given topic there are a multitudeof viewpoints represented in the collection.

KingDavidsB1tch
KingDavidsB1tch

LOL... too funny that the 15 year old slave girl can't even spell and doesn't know what research means.  I agree with the above, all except for the fiction.  I see nothing wrong with having his fiction in the library as there are some decent stories there (if you can put your bias aside you'd know that).

SP 'Onage
SP 'Onage

Half hour to go before Tony's blog on Debbie Cook. Haven't slept, trying to not...zZzZzZz

DodoTheLaser
DodoTheLaser

I might be entirely wrong, but it seems that most librarians are really annoyed at this point about any book that has L. Ron Hubbard name  on its cover. Them Librarians....

SP 'Onage
SP 'Onage

Have you viewed this YouTube video yet?

Scientology Library Dump-Unpacking The 9th Set Of Basics

These librarians are having a blast making fun of the scilon book shipment they received. lol

Unex Skcus
Unex Skcus

The Aussies are still busy. This time it's Channel Nine's 'A Current Affair' with a rehash of the Debbie Cook saga:

"Scientology head under fire"

http://aca.ninemsn.com.Xau/article/8427100/scientology-head-under-fire (remove X from Xau)

LightOfTruth123
LightOfTruth123

Ooh-la-la, I just watched the vid.

Looks like Debbie is ready to divulge all, especially with regard to "follow the money".

Unex Skcus
Unex Skcus

You are so right. "Follow the money ".

Easier to say than do, but Tony, if you start a section called "Co$ - Where Is The Money", your 'audience' here would be able to contribute many bits of the puzzle together. Newsworthy - I think so!

SP 'Onage
SP 'Onage

The Tampa Bay Times: Sweet!

Pinellas district officials sour on new charter for Life Force school

SP 'Onage
SP 'Onage

"Officials also questioned the oversight of the school's board of directors in ensuring the amended charter was upheld. Like Islam, most board members have yet to give their fingerprints for background screenings mandated by the state's Jessica Lunsford Act."

Cheezit, these shady crooks haven't given their fingerprints! Hiding something, maybe, Hanan Islam and cronies?

kirstieFATalley
kirstieFATalley

The Scientology cult followers also "remove" books they don't like from libraries. Former operatives have detailed how they were ordered to travel around and damage or steal certain books that expose Scientology abuses.  

Marcotai
Marcotai

That's not true!Anti-SCN books didn't even hit the shelves of one Anonymous cult member's kiosk, let alone hitting a bookstall or a library !

TRUTH
TRUTH

Wait a minute, all considerations of the validity and credibility of Hubbard aside, it's disturbing that this librarian would use the excuse that anything donated by the Church would have to be "peer reviewed" with "scientific research" and not be labeled "Dianetics" or "Scientology." That smacks of censorship.

Is this librarian seriously suggesting that the Christian Bible, Jewish Torah/Tanakh/Kabbalah, Muslim Quran, Buddhist and Hindu scriptures, Mormon texts, etc. all be checked for scientific accuracy and subjected to peer review?

There are about 21 Dianetics and Scientology books total that are part of the so-called Library Campaign. Each of those sets have been paid for in FULL ($450 or so) by individual Scientologists. 21 books don't take up much shelf space. Throw out the old editions of Hubbard's books and replace them with the new ones. Any library is already going to have books on a variety of subjects from religion to psychology and philosophy and on and on, so what's the big deal? Even if someone considers the Church to be an evil organization, I still don't see what the problem is.

What's next, librarians refusing to put books by Aleister Crowley and Anton LaVey on their shelves? Or refusing to carry Buddhist and Hindu texts because they are "pagan"? Or Mormon texts because they're also a brainwashing cult like Scientology? Where does it end? Do the public not have a right to free access to such material for their own perusal?

The more you censor something like Scientology, the more you add to its mystique and the idea that it is something special. If you allow people free access to Scientology materials, they will read it and get bored and move on. Guaranteed. You can get all this stuff on the Internet, but honestly, the average person will not bother taking the time to find this material online since unless you know a thing or two about torrents and file hosting sites, it's a hassle. Average person would go to a library. At least, I hope people still go to libraries!

But anyway, point is a public library has no right to act as a censor, except obviously when illegal material is involved. People have a right to free access to any material that is legally available. That's what the goddamn public libraries are there for and that's what local taxpayer money goes to support! I may not be interested in reading Magick In Theory and Practice, but sure as hell I want the right to read it if I so choose! And BTW Tony, the major Scientology orgs tend to carry Crowley's works in their Qual libraries since it is an LRH policy that Qual carry each and every book referenced by LRH in his lectures, books, policies, bulletins, etc. Any Scientologist who has done the PDC course will be at least a little bit familiar with Crowley, and those who have gotten through the Briefing Course are probably very familiar. I've never met anyone who was Class VI or above who wasn't intimately familiar with Crowley.

Getting back to the point, the worst part of libraries throwing these books out is the fact that a Scientologist was bilked out of hard earned money to pay for each set. I can understand if a library receives several sets and they only need one, so they get rid of the rest - that would be the Church's fault. But when a library has NO sets at all, why throw the books out like that? That's not right.

What I encourage people to do is to write to these ignorant librarians who are doing such things and explaining to them that if their library has no sets, to at least stock one. It's not going to kill or harm anyone. They're books! It's pretty pathetic that this library in Detroit has no problem with stocking Mein Kampf, but doesn't want any Hubbard writings at all! WTF? And even then I would not suggest that any library refuse to put Mein Kampf on its shelves, because people should have the right to read Hitler's insanity in order to understand how the hell the Holocaust could possibly have happened!

I swear, I don't know which is more insane, the anti-Scientology zealots, or the Scientology zealots! The two sides really make me sick. Scientology zealotry always made me sick, but I never expected those who opposed Scientology to start behaving like Scientologists!!!

LightOfTruth123
LightOfTruth123

"It's not going to kill or harm anyone."

Your thinking is flawed. What's the difference between Scientology and the others you've mentioned (Crowley, Mein Kampf, Anton LaVey).

Everyone knows Crowley was a satanist, everyone knows Hitler's ideas were insane, everyone knows LaVey was a satanist. In other words, you know what you're getting when you pick up the book.

Scientology, on the other hand, is dark masquerading as light. Scientology doesn't portray Hubbard as the satanist that he was. Youngsters get tricked into this deception, and then they re-emerge 30-40-something years later with harrowing stories about how they lost everything, their youth, their families, their money, their sanity.

No-one lives in an isolated bubble. If you know something is destructive, deceptive, and a scam, it's your duty to warn and/or shield others from it - ESPECIALLY inexperienced children who have not developed discernment yet.

This librarian did exactly what he was supposed to do as a human being, who is concerned about others.

Alan Naldrett
Alan Naldrett

Maybe the actual problem is of comprehension.  Perhaps you were given a Study Course that emphasized word by word knowledge as opposed to dealing with the whole paragraph. The Scientology books were given a chance, and just as in any library, when they weren't checked out FOR FIVE YEARS or actually,ever, they were replaced. If someone wants a Scientology book, or Mein Kampf we'll get it for them, it is a research topic. Some library will probably have it.  And we won't laugh at you until after you leave.

Nexi Bello
Nexi Bello

"And we won't laugh at you until after you leave."There are some comforting fundamental facts in life: after the rain comes the sun, doctors/dentists/librarians don't laugh about us after we leave (even less so while we are still there).

Xenu's advocate
Xenu's advocate

Unlike 'Ideal Orgs', libraries have neither a surplus of empty space nor an army of slave labour to stock and maintain them. A library must thus choose between which books to keep and which to discard. These books are chosen on the basis of a number of criterion including popularity and their importance within core designated fields. Now, 

(a)  As it turns out, the library had carried these books in the past and no one took them out. (b) COS is sending libraries books which claim to be works of non-fiction dealing with issues of science, philosophy, sociology, economics, education, etc. It is perfectly reasonable to expect such works to be peer reviewed. The parallels you attempt to draw to with other texts simply do not hold: (a) Popularity: Lavey and Crowley books tend to get taken out.(b) Importance to their designated field: Buddhism, Judaism and Islam of major world religions. (Scientology is not a major world religion, despite the greatly inflated claims of membership.) (c) Mein Kampf, while repulsive, is an important historical document that played a key role in the largest war of the 20th Century. The fact is that today the works of Hubbard are only of interest to a very select few, such as religious scholars, the handful of Scientologists who weren't already forced to buy these books and a few Scientology watchers. A public library that has to serve a broad public neither can nor should be expected to carry such esoteric works. Why would you even expect a library to carry what to most people amounts either outdated fifth-rate pulp fiction or supposed non-fiction, all of which is published by one man's own private vanity press?

hgc
hgc

Believe it or not, shelf space in a small library is precious. Twenty-one books is a BFD. You can't take up that much space all at once with absolute crap that no one other than those who already own their own copies want to read.

Hiro
Hiro

Well, I'm fairly certain they aren't gassing mobs of people in Germany anymore. 

But scientology is still abusing people, based on numerous recent news reports. 

So I think your argument is invalid. 

It is correct to throw out material that is designed to deceive and financially destroy the recipient.

 

DMSTCC
DMSTCC

Simple: Shelf and storage space is finite. Books that gather dust (have not beenchecked out for years) are expendable are discarded for recycle. 

Marcotai
Marcotai

Welcome in Tony's real word pal.:)

Hiro
Hiro

Generally it is best if you don't try to understand Hubbard.  He was insane. He invented words.  Your in a far better place to avoid his writing.  

MarkStark
MarkStark

 I agree. It is hard to differentiate both the good and bad effects he had on people's lives, if you delve too deeply trying to understand what he meant, in that mountain of shifting garbage that was his writing, or look too closely at his diagram for his de-insane-o-rizor stick...There are many brilliant thinkers in the world whose ideas are worthy of consideration and analysis, and to spend too much time trying to get inside the mind of someone like Hubbard, or Hitler for that matter. is just disturbing.

Instead, with Scientology, it is more revealing to think in terms of systems of control. Bait and switch. Carrot on a stick. Hypnosis. The Gradient. That way, you won't feel nutz yourself, trying to figure out the details, musing on ideas like, it was Ron's low-hangers that triggered this billion dollar mess or what about a man evolving from a clam could possibly make any sense to a sentient human being of reasonable intelligence.

Wishful and magickal thinkers meet Ron with all the answers, but some of the answers!

Hiro
Hiro

Edit: You're. 

Hatchune Shun
Hatchune Shun

I wish that theres a scientology book within reach, and laugh at its contents, then return it to the shelf.

When its for free, i'd pick it up, and substitute it as toilet paper.

Prolly a good use for near useless books. Lest each page is filled with dead alien lice.

Marcotai
Marcotai

Even the Encyclopedia Britannica would not enough for you as a toilet paper. 

Marcotai
Marcotai

It seems that my important post is deliberately being blurred by hate mongering.So here is it again:Actually the vast majority of librarians are very happy with those donations.Many of them were actually waiting for those materials because many people asked for them.Bridge Pubs and new Era Pubs. have thousands of letters of appreciation sent by librarians around the world.Tony, you may ask those Scientology publications companies copies of those letters so as to publish some of them in here...Well...only if you wish to be objective on your reporting.But that (objective journalism) is far from your agenda, isn't it? 

NCSP
NCSP

See my post above.  I also had an amusing email exchange with the head of acquisitions at my library and a friend who's a librarian at a school in another state. No one wants Scientology's garbage books. What's more, they find them *hilarious*.

You should have seen the hilarity that ensued when I ordered volumes from the "Ron Series" from Interlibrary Loan last year. (There are only a handful of copies in libraries nationwide.)  And the relief on the circulation librarians' faces when I assured them it was only for research and they could laugh without offending me!

Marcotai
Marcotai

Maybe you didn't realize that those librarians were laughing about YOU and not about LRH's books. Think again.

NCSP
NCSP

You're absolutely right: before they knew I wasn't a Scientologist, they were laughing at me for ordering such nonsense. I'm sure librarians on both ends of that transaction had a good chuckle that those ridiculous books were actually being requested!

Kira
Kira

Marcotai,

Perhaps you could create a consolidated website where those tens of thousands of loving letters from librarians could be displayed?  Then the public could go about the task of cross-checking to see if any of them are legitimate.  Hard to trust liars!!! LOL

 

SP 'Onage
SP 'Onage

Yeah. He needs to send dox to Tony or STFU.

Did anybody else read the new drama about Debbie Cook? The angry poodle is sooooo angry he now wants the names of all the people who donated to her defense fund.

Jgg
Jgg

  We don't hate people who express honest differences of opinion, or who are simply different (i.e. different race, religion, gender orientation, etc.)  We do hate people who use fraud and coercion to hurt others.

Hiro
Hiro

Teach us about ethics! 

Yes, we all want to learn about ethic from a scientologist!!!

LOL

Marcotai
Marcotai

Or...a more ethical website.

Hiro
Hiro

Maybe use a different browser

Marcotai
Marcotai

Tell me what you don't hate. please. 

SP 'Onage
SP 'Onage

Why is this posting as Getsmart? I have cleared cookies, reset, etc....wtf?

I hate DISQUS!

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