Alexander Jentzsch's Death Under Investigation After Unusual Responses from Scientology In-Laws

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Alexander Jentzsch
On Friday, we learned that the coroner's investigation into Alexander Jentzsch's death had taken an unusual turn because of some unusual responses from the people who found his unresponsive body.

We kept quiet about that until this afternoon at the request of Karen de la Carriere, Alexander's mother, who was concerned about Scientology interference with the coroner's investigation.

But now, after RadarOnline wrote about the situation today, we're adding a little more detail about what we know.

Alexander Jentzsch, 27, had been staying at the home of his in-laws. LA Coroner Assistant Chief Ed Winter told Karen de la Carriere that on Monday, July 2, the in-laws had noticed Jentzsch still in bed at about 9 am when they left their house. Twelve hours later, when they returned, Jentzsch had not moved, but they did not check on him. The next morning, on July 3, when they saw that Jentzsch was still in the same position, the father-in-law checked on him and found him unresponsive.

At that point, Karen says Winter told her, the father-in-law then took a child to school and only after he returned and still found Jentzsch unresponsive did he call 9-1-1.

In addition, Karen says the coroner has complained to her that he is not getting cooperation from Jentzsch's wife. "Ed Winter told us that Alexander's wife is not returning his phone calls," she says.

RadarOnline reports that Winter said the LAPD is now getting involved to investigate the death.

"Why on earth would you take a child to school first?" De la Carriere says. "They told the coroner that Alexander had been excessively drinking alcohol and over-self-medicating. If they knew that he was self-medicating, then why didn't they do anything when he didn't move in his bed for 24 hours?"

A toxicology report on Alexander's condition will still take several more weeks, but on Friday Winter confirmed to me that he had concerns about the case, but he asked me not to write anything about it then. Now, he's telling RadarOnline that the LAPD is getting involved.

The death has cast a spotlight on Scientology because of the way Alexander and his two parents were handled by the church. Alexander had joined the Sea Org -- Scientology's hardcore elite that sign billion-year contracts -- at only 8 years of age. He had served in the Sea Org for 16 years.

His father is Heber Jentzsch, who has been the president of the Church of Scientology International since 1982. But in about 2004, Jentzsch had so fallen from favor by the church's ultimate ruler, David Miscavige, he was pulled from public view. Former executives say that they saw Heber in "The Hole," Scientology's bizarre office-prison at the International Base, and they believe he was there from about 2004 until today. We received a report that he was released from the base long enough to attend a memorial last week for Alexander.

De La Carriere was not invited to that service because she had been excommunicated by Scientology in 2010 for speaking publicly about Heber's treatment. (She put on a memorial service of her own on Friday.) As a result of that excommunication -- in church-speak she was "declared a suppressive person" -- her own son, Alexander, was forced to "disconnect" from her. She had had no contact with him during the last two years of his life, and then was prevented from seeing her son's body before it was cremated by Alexander's wife, who is a Scientologist.

We have made repeated attempts to get statements about Heber and Alexander Jentzsch from the church, but have received no replies.



See also:
What Katie is saving Suri from: Scientology interrogation of kids
Scientology's new defections: Hubbard's granddaughter and Miscavige's dad
Scientology's disgrace: our open letter to Tom Cruise
Scientology crumbling: An entire mission defects as a group
Scientology leader David Miscavige's vanished wife: Where's Shelly?

Please check out our Facebook author page for updates and schedules.



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Tony Ortega has been the editor in chief of the Village Voice since March, 2007. He started writing about Scientology in 1995. You can reach him by e-mail at tortega@villagevoice.com, and if you ask nicely he'll put you on his mailing list for notifications of new stories. You can also catch his alerts at Twitter (@VoiceTonyO), at his Facebook author page, on Pinterest, a Tumblr, and even this new Google Plus doohickey.

New readers might want to check out our primer, "What is Scientology?" Another good overview is our series from last summer, "Top 25 People Crippling Scientology." At the top of every story, you'll see the "Scientology" category which, if you click on it, will bring up all of our most recent stories.

As for hot subjects we've covered here, you may have heard about Debbie Cook, the former church official who rebelled and was sued by Scientology. You might have also heard about the Super Power Building, Scientology's "Mecca," whose secrets were revealed here. We also reported how Scientology spied on its own most precious object, Tom Cruise. (We wrote Tom an open letter that he has yet to respond to.) Have you seen a Scientology ad on TV lately? We debunked some of the claims in that 2-minute commercial you might have seen while watching Glee or American Idol.

Other stories have looked at Scientology's policy of "disconnection" that is tearing families apart. You may also have heard something about the Sea Org experiences of the Paris sisters, Valeska and Melissa, and their friend Ramana Dienes-Browning. We've also featured Paulette Cooper, who wrote about Scientology back in the day, and Janet Reitman, Hugh Urban, and the team at the Tampa Bay Times, who write about it today. And there's plenty more coming.

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26 comments
almchrl1
almchrl1

How can someone be put in 'the hole'?

Heber is still an American citizen.  When did he give up those rights?

ClamInAHalfshell
ClamInAHalfshell

 @almchrl1 When he became a $eaOrg $cibot.  He still has those rights.  He just hasn't asserted them in decades.

media_lush
media_lush

yeah, that tactic obviously worked great with Travolta

Propertmesh
Propertmesh

visit www.propertymwsh.com for all your real estate needs ,for buying,renting,selling a property and get best deal for your property in India.

MrX112233
MrX112233

Is there a possible connection between Alexander's death and the Tom and Katie split?  I know it sounds crazy, but just hear me out.   Suppose for a moment that Tom's alleged gay rumors are true.  Now suppose that DM thinks twice about strict enforcement of $cientology's anti-gay rules in Tom's case, being that he is one of the biggest movie stars in the world, the cult's most important ambassador, and DM's good friend.  The only real concern would be Tom's public reputation.  Now suppose they conclude that it is better to allow Tom a controlled outlet for his sexuality then keep him completely repressed to the point that he is jumping on couches, so they set out on "Mission Possible" to find him a secret lover.    As an added bonus, DM might even arrange a way to record the meetings as an insurance policy against Tom ever waking up and trying to defect. Now the church has piles of e-metered auditing records of every homosexual experience, thought and fantasy of its parishioners, so finding a list of potential candidates would be simple.    Of course it would have to be someone very high up in the secret hierarchy, like the son of a high-ranking church official.  And of course, to make it seem less plausible if the truth ever came out, the lover would have to have a wife. Now suppose Katie discovered that Tom and Alexander were lovers?  

SmallChange
SmallChange like.author.displayName 1 Like

Codswallop is a new one. I had to look that up.

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp

This sounds like a good reason for OSA to keep Alexander A) Under control B) Silent And possibly even a good reason for OSA to want him to die. There's your motive, from an organizational standpoint.

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

All we have to go by so far is this report in Tony's article: "Alexander Jentzsch, 27, had been staying at the home of his in-laws. LA Coroner Assistant Chief Ed Winter told Karen de la Carriere that on Monday, July 2, the in-laws had noticed Jentzsch still in bed at about 9 am when they left their house. Twelve hours later, when they returned, Jentzsch had not moved, but they did not check on him. The next morning, on July 3, when they saw that Jentzsch was still in the same position, the father-in-law checked on him and found him unresponsive. " It's possible he was already dead at 9 am the first morning that they saw him in bed, because 12 hours later he "hadn't moved". Then they went to bed and found him dead the next morning.  It's really unbelievable. These people obviously cared nothing for Alexander.

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

They might have done this if they had written Alexander off for some reason. If they don't like you for some reason, they will abandon you. If they want you to die, they will let you die. I strongly suspect Alexander was not conforming to their program. Read Nancy Many's book for more detail on how OSA treats non-conformists who are under their control. 

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

Dead bodies are not kept from cremation or burial in order to wait for toxicology results. All necessary fluid samples are withdrawn before cremation. There are only so may tests available at this time. Once you've got all the fluid samples, you no longer need the body. It would be wrong to store a dead body for the 6-8 weeks while waiting for the tox results, and not allow the burial or cremation to take place, especially when you no longer need the body to do the tests. The bulk of the investigation is done by the autopsy. The toxicology is the last thing that can be done to get evidence. From what I understand an autopsy was performed prior to cremation. 

SmallChange
SmallChange

Well we don't really know what they will uncover.

SmallChange
SmallChange

Off topic: Inside Tom Cruise's Private Pain "Tom is not ashamed of his beliefs," says the source, who knows the former couple, "and won’t hide them from his daughter." http://www.people Dot com/people/article/0,,20612724,00.html

SmallChange
SmallChange like.author.displayName 1 Like

It's strange because the Disqus system allows links on some sites and not others. I wonder if that is by design of the individual host sites?

P_krenik
P_krenik

This is getting a bit far out.  He wasn't fat way back in the late 40's and 50's.  He married again in 1952 or so, had another four children, and played it straight during that time.  No stepping out on Mary Sue.  So whatever he did when he was young, he shaped up with the rest of us who come to our senses as we age.

SmallChange
SmallChange

True. But so far there is no proof that Scientology is to blame. This is considered a local investigation where the guy's in laws acted suspicious about his death. Now you know, and I know, that they were Scientologists, and the speculation is that they were following Scientology protocol, but since they aren't cooperating, there is no link from A to B. There are no witnesses, at this point, to tie their actions to any Scientology practice, even if that had been the case.

SmallChange
SmallChange like.author.displayName 1 Like

I just looked it up. Apparently they can investigate if it is a capital case. Kidnapping alone is no longer a capital case. But if the death is deemed a homicide, especially something like a first degree murder, I believe that they can investigate, even if the kidnapping did not cross state lines. I have no idea whether the Lindbergh Law could or would apply here.

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

Most Americans treat their pets and even their farm animals with more care, compassion and dignity than these in-laws apparently treated Alexander. This whole thing illustrates the true colors of the Church of Scientology, especially when OSA gets involved. The in-laws would have been taking advice directly from OSA, wherever Alexander was concerned. Read Nancy Many's book, "My Billion Year Contract" for a complete blow-by-blow of OSA's methods. I hope law enforcement intervenes before the next unnecessary death happens. 

SmallChange
SmallChange like.author.displayName 1 Like

There are records for landlines. You just don't receive them in your bill.

dee
dee

I'm sitting here in Amazement at the fact all this abuse is condoned because the Great God L Ron Hubbard said So somewhere along the way, to someone who has just joined this wonderful world of TO and the BS of the church of Scientology it's overwhelming, 1) is anybody/ org  collecting the evidence of all the abuse.. if so where( i would send my donation and shake a banner)... if not why the hell not  2) i saw a photo somewhere over my travels on the net with a picture of the top members of the cos saying just where they are now and just how many of them had left the church or in the "hold" 3) no marriage in sea org 4) you have to ask to procreate and if not terminate or be kicked out of sea org (even the thugee cult was allowed to procreate) 5) child abuse/ sexual abuse of a minor  6) child slavery billion year contracts and all (is it not illegal for any minor to sign a contract like this) my daughter cant even get phone a contract at 17 in the UK  7) all the people willing to take a settlement/compensation/backhand, money and keep their mouths shut are just as bad or worse they condone it  8) all the people who still condone it and justify their actions of not saying anything as they do not wish to upset their own apple cart and or could be held accountable in a court of law  oh and the list can go on and on how can the people who keep there mouth shut look at themselves in the mirror sitting in silence ( all the time accepting it as long as it's not their family or them)  To Karen  my condolences on the loss of your son this road may be long and hard and sometimes you will feel like nothing you are doing or saying is working out as it should it took Doreen Lawrence nineteen years to get justice for her son But she got it in the end just keep fighting Karen even on the days especially on the days when you think it's going nowhere that no one is listening we are and we all think it's BS that the authorities are not doing all they can to close this business/cult/church down

lovestoread
lovestoread

 There have been quite a few posts suggesting pulling the in-laws phone records.  There may not be any phone records if they were using a landline in their own home.  A lot of folks still have landlines, especially older people.

ClamInAHalfshell
ClamInAHalfshell

lovestoread, Land-lines still have phone records. The phone company has to bill you somehow.

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