Scientology Auditing Kids: Proof From Church's Own School Website

Categories: Scientology

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For the last two weeks, we've been asked one thing more than any other: what was Suri facing as a six-year-old in Scientology if she hadn't been taken out of it by her mother, Katie Holmes? Does indoctrination in the church start at such a young age?

As we reported earlier, in 1961 Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard created a "security check" for children aged 6 to 12. This list of 99 questions was designed to be used to interrogate a child holding the sensors of an e-meter by an ethics officer outside of the presence of the child's parents. Claire Headley told us she was "sec checked" at only 7 years of age, and she knew of other kids who went through it as well.

If sec checking is the dark side of auditing, we wondered about auditing itself -- the counseling that Scientologists go through as they clear their minds of clutter in order to discover their true, immortal selves. How common is it for small children to go through auditing, we wondered, and we wanted to get evidence of it today, not from some policy Hubbard might have written years ago.

Well, we found an intriguing answer to that question, and from a pretty impeccable source -- a website from a Scientology-affiliated school.

The Mace-Kingsley Family Center in Clearwater, Florida was originally founded in Los Angeles in 1980 by two women, Debbi Mace and Carol Kingsley. It's been in Clearwater since 1989.

According to its website, the center "was founded on the concept that using L. Ron Hubbard's technology to work with children and families is the key to resolving difficulties and problems they may have."

The website features numerous articles about children and auditing. We were struck by the youth of the child in the photo that accompanied this headline...

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That story includes this paragraph...

So what then can you possibly audit with an infant, baby or child? There are many, many processes that help a being get oriented to the physical universe and become in better control of his body and environment. The results of this have been a happier child, who grows well with little illness and accidents.

Hey, that sounds fun.

Then there's this piece...

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Which includes this heartwarming anecdote...

Our 7 year old daughter did not want to learn to read...It had gotten so bad it looked like our 5 year old daughter would be reading before our 7 year old. Her postulate to stay young was so strong, even her teeth were coming in late - at about the same rate as her younger sister. We took her to Mace Kingsley and bought her some auditing. She went through her program and lo, and behold, we had a beginning reader on our hands.

And then we noticed the opening line to this piece...

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And if that weren't enough, on another part of the website we later ran into this bit of reality...

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We're not sure how infants hold the cans, but at least we know a toddler can get a head start on ridding himself of engrams at Mace-Kingsley.

So now we know: Suri is definitely old enough to get auditing and begin her indoctrination into the Scientology way of thinking and talking. Katie had plenty of reason to get out of there, if her goal was to keep Suri from getting too deep into Scientology's interrogation culture and mind-bending lingo.

A further note: Mention "Mace-Kingsley" to students of Scientology history, and they will wince. From 1987 to 2002, the Mace-Kingsley Ranch School was a notorious place that existed in California and later New Mexico where Scientology kids were sent and then complained about hardships and abuse, as Janet Reitman noted in her 2006 Rolling Stone article, "Inside Scientology," which led to her 2011 book of the same name.


Steven Hassan and Karen Pressley Break It Down

A few days ago we complained that Steven Hassan had been wasted by Piers Morgan, who put on a segment about Scientology so rushed, Hassan hardly got a chance to get going.

Thankfully, he's taped his own discussion of recent events with ex-Scientologist Karen Pressley, and their conversation is very watchable. They go into child sec checking and many more subjects. Enjoy.

Much more coming, so please check our Facebook author page for updates and schedules.


See also:
What Katie is saving Suri from: Scientology interrogation of kids
Scientology's new defections: Hubbard's granddaughter and Miscavige's dad
Scientology's disgrace: our open letter to Tom Cruise
Scientology crumbling: An entire mission defects as a group
Scientology leader David Miscavige's vanished wife: Where's Shelly?


**********
Tony Ortega has been the editor in chief of the Village Voice since March, 2007. He started writing about Scientology in 1995. You can reach him by e-mail at tortega@villagevoice.com, and if you ask nicely he'll put you on his mailing list for notifications of new stories. You can also catch his alerts at Twitter (@VoiceTonyO), at his Facebook author page, on Pinterest, a Tumblr, and even this new Google Plus doohickey.

New readers might want to check out our primer, "What is Scientology?" Another good overview is our series from last summer, "Top 25 People Crippling Scientology." At the top of every story, you'll see the "Scientology" category which, if you click on it, will bring up all of our most recent stories.

As for hot subjects we've covered here, you may have heard about Debbie Cook, the former church official who rebelled and was sued by Scientology. You might have also heard about the Super Power Building, Scientology's "Mecca," whose secrets were revealed here. We also reported how Scientology spied on its own most precious object, Tom Cruise. (We wrote Tom an open letter that he has yet to respond to.) Have you seen a Scientology ad on TV lately? We debunked some of the claims in that 2-minute commercial you might have seen while watching Glee or American Idol.

Other stories have looked at Scientology's policy of "disconnection" that is tearing families apart. You may also have heard something about the Sea Org experiences of the Paris sisters, Valeska and Melissa, and their friend Ramana Dienes-Browning. We've also featured Paulette Cooper, who wrote about Scientology back in the day, and Janet Reitman, Hugh Urban, and the team at the Tampa Bay Times, who write about it today. And there's plenty more coming.


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20 comments
AussieCase
AussieCase

I was $cn staff for almost 2 years in the late 80's early 90's. I joined and I was sent to Florida to learn to audit, we trained from morning to night almost every day. I did not perform the children sec checks, but I have heard of it being done.

 

I would like to mention, there were two forms of confessionals (sec checks), normal ones and the "HCO Confessionals."  HCO, stands for Hubbard Communications Office, and somehow it encompasses the "ethics" arm. Before one starts an HCO confessional, the one says to the person being audited, "I am not auditing you." I would write "NAY" on the top of the fist page of notes that I took, afterwards I would proceed as normal.

 

Looking back this seems Orwellian, the point is that the confessions given in a sec check that begins with the phrase, "I am not auditing you." will be reported to an "ethics" officer. In addition to the standard notes, the auditor writes a report.

 

For almost year that I was in Florida, I hung out with auditor trainees, either form the sea org or other small organizations. The people I was friends with were all fairly new to this, myself included, and we had not done any OT levels. We would of course receive sec checks, and we would joke that we never get any "auditing."

 

After receiving a sec check, I would go to a section called "ethics" and review the reports, some times I would correct the reports if the auditor misheard or wrote them down incorrectly, and then I would be given a project to "make amends."

 

So does this stuff do anything? No. People buy in and want to feel good after paying thousands of dollars to talk an auditor for 12.5 hours, so they are happy initially. Ultimately they get annoyed when nothing long term happens, and then they need "repairs."

 

There is one scientific of Dianetics that I've heard of that essentially found it ineffective based on three specific measures. This study is archived on xenu.net.

 

How did I buy in to it? This is something I really would like to answer, I have read about thought reform by Robert Lifton and I think what I experienced is consistent with his eight criteria.

 

Am I more weak minded that most? Perhaps I am. I joined at a vulnerable time, in my late teens after having experienced the death of someone I was very close too.

 

Does $cn look through folders for material that is in normal confessionals or auditing?

As auditors we were taught to respect confidentiality, which is sensible. However there is one thing that happened. I was about to take a public person in for auditing at my local organization, but I could not find the folder. On a hunch, I broke the lock of the OSA office door. OSA is the office of special affairs, the $cn security and black PR wing. The folder was there on a desk. I did my auditing as I was suppose to, but I was fairly unhappy for the next bit. To me this was very wrong. Ultimately I was sent to ethics and I had to repair the lock.

 

I didn't stay around much longer after that.

John P.
John P.

You and I are cool.   I spent the time I did penning my reply because I was just so amused that I had for the first time acquired my very own "hater," hurling a personal insult my direction.  So I decided to have a little fun.  The crowd I run with here at Global Capitalism HQ are such that when you have been insulted, you know it, and you don't, as tough as you may be, forget it.  The stakes in my world are pretty high, and calling me a schmuck doesn't really move the needle. And the general tone in this forum is against personal labels...   I certainly don't feel like I was being attacked because "Ziontologist" told me he got some benefits out of Scientology.  I was simply laughing because his points were raised for the purpose of justifying the epithet, which was also amusing in that it was a) not terribly creative and b) not all that impactful.  He didn't rise to the level of reasoned discourse that would convince me that I'm a schmuck or worse.  (Incidentally, I do my best to admit publicly I'm wrong when other commenters here present evidence that I'm in error. I also write notes acknowledging respect of well-articulated opinions that I happen to disagree with).     Yes, my statement about auditing is an educated guess, since I've never been a Scientologist.  I try hard to be a skeptic, not a cynic.  While I am extremely doubtful that e-meter auditing can be effective in a wide variety of circumstances, I'm open to being convinced.  It sounds a little silly to believe that a flashing light as part of a therapy session can help cure deep cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, but that's exactly what EMDR therapy does, and it's a recognized valid technique when properly administered.   I definitely don't believe that auditing can deliver the super-power benefits that Hubbard claimed, and I also am struck by the lack of any sort of longitudinal study to identify claimed benefits for it as a technique and to verify that whatever benefits are claimed remain for a reasonable period of time.  Despite that, I remain willing to believe that there may be some circumstances where it can be helpful.  That's a lot more open minded than many on this board.  I respect the right of people to do auditing or any other thing they want and to claim that they subjectively "feel better."  I have done a lot of human potential things and felt better afterwards, to greater or lesser degree and to greater or lesser duration.  One such was those isolation tanks where you float in tepid salt water with no sound, light etc.  These were popular in the late 1970s and 1980s.  I "felt better" after the dozen times I did it but don't claim any permanent benefit on any specific area of my life.  If you feel that auditing makes you "feel better," knock yourself out.  I'm not going to try to tell you that you didn't really feel better after an hour "holding the cans."   But it is hard to equate subjectively "feel better" with verifiable "enables making significant and sustained behavioral changes" without external  evidence collected with an appropriate methodology.  So on the one hand, I'm still a little bit open to believing that there's some potential to auditing, but on the other, subjective "feel better" no matter how true it may be for you, is not enough to convince me of broad efficacy across a large population.  Regarding "You got defensive when he said, 'If it wasn't for the dreamers and visionaries, you would have nothing to exploit.'"  Not true.  I actually attacked, rather than rocking back on defense in response to a point he was able to raise that weakened my argument.   Incidentally, I reacted to this statement because I have lots of people traipse through my office trying to get me to invest in their companies.  All are optimists and dreamers.  I respect people who go out and start companies.  I'm still working for The Man.  But I spend a lot of time trying to separate out the once-in-a-generation ones that will create incredible wealth from those whose visions are not as comprehensive as the best in the game.  We invest in the best, respect and appreciate many that we don't invest in, and we heap scorn on the charlatans.   In meeting with hundreds of entrepreneurs over the years, it is a virtually infallible rule of thumb that the more that people try to convince me that they are visionaries and dreamers, the greater the odds they are charlatans (and usually unsophisticated ones at that).  That's certainly the case with Hubbard.  The true visionaries let their vision, the discussion of what they're doing to bring their vision about, and the track record thus far for getting the job done speak for itself.  In the time I've been looking at the cult, I've heard many statements of the general form that "If people truly understood the incredible genius shown by L. Ron Hubbard, they would eagerly embrace Scientology."  In other words, "we get no respect because people don't respect L. Ron Hubbard."  This statement is a way of responding to an attack on the specific statements and ideas that Hubbard created by tapping into an emotional "victim" response -- "they're picking on my religion."  Sarah Palin played this victim card ceaselessly in the 2008 campaign -- "I'm not stupid, it's the Liberal Media that are picking on me."   Re my comment that I'm smarter than Ziontologist, my statement was no worse than his calling me a schmuck.  I certainly don't equate income with smarts, and I certainly don't think innate intelligence matters that much in how much happiness people achieve in life.  He put intelligence into play.

Noah Miller
Noah Miller

At this level Auditing loses any definition at all. Talking in any way to someone is apparently auditing. Congrats you renamed a term in language. 

Gramps
Gramps

 So Gaiman stands with "groups he feels are being persecuted?" He thinks Scientology who interrogates people and throws them in camps is being persecuted? Gaiman’s two sisters, Claire Edwards and Lizzie Calciole are not just high-ranking Scientologists, they are the head of RECRUITING and the head of Wealden House, the Scientology stronghold in East Grinstead. These two cannot associate with Neil unless he is in good standing.

Gramps
Gramps

Gaiman is listed as a Cornerstone club member in 2009 for a donation of 35,000. He is also listed as a Patron of Scientology. Gaiman's ex-wife Mary Gaiman, who he co-owns The Blank Corp with gave half a million of Blank Corp money to build a Minneapolis Ideal Org in 2010. Amanda Palmer is from a Sea Org family, the Mockett's (Doug Mockett who supplies building material for Orgs and the Palmer's). Gaiman's denials are ludicrous.

OTVIIIisGrrr8!
OTVIIIisGrrr8!

 But the child did have a strong postulate to stay young. That is why her teeth were so late in coming in and why she did not want to learn how to read. All of this is quite self-evident.

OTVIIIisGrrr8!
OTVIIIisGrrr8!

Yes, you will be safe from Psych-Fracking if you are: 1. In an Ideal Org on course 2. Aboard The Freewinds on course 3. Watching any Tom Cruise movie While do accept credit card donations, we prefer trust deeds to homes that are paid for. dental gold, and large sums of untraceable cash.  Thank you.

IslandTME
IslandTME

I think their drug program attracts people that should be in therepy.  And the cutl helps play to the Narcicist in them.  They can blame everyone else for their failiers and themselves for their wins.  I think my already small minded brother really thinks he is going to get super humans powers and is already after a very short time in, believes he is smarther that everyone around him and that he is somehow in control of them because of his new found skills.  "These are not the Droids your looking for.  Move along." 

IslandTME
IslandTME

Speeking just as a "wog" or maybe even SP who's brother just got indoctronated.  I hope you keep speeking up.  You still have a chance to "SAVE" alot of people.  Help this story keep going!!!  I don't want my nieces and nephews going through that!

IslandTME
IslandTME

You're so right.  Most of the top people are way to narcicitic to kill themselves.  But it will be the people making $15 a day working 15 hour days that will suffer with those thoughts.

IslandTME
IslandTME

Even if you don't act, please keep writing about it.  I think the time has come for all Ex-$cis to speek.  The Cult can't sue the world!

Ron
Ron

Bob Adams used to be vice-president of Church of Scientology International, Heber's 2nd in command (as if either commanded anything).

Ron
Ron

Look on the bright side: it didn't enturbulate all over your leg.

still keyed out
still keyed out

ATTENTION:  PEOPLE OF EARTH Earthling scientists are now studying "exteriorization" in their laboratories. For a scientific account of exteriorization, or "out of body experiences," google this title: [  Real Out-of-Body Experiences By providing wrong but matching views and feelings, scientists mentally "teleport" people outside their own bodies  ] Sure beats yelling at an ashtray!

Ron
Ron

Here's another one. The Purification Rundown is very dangerous Scientology quackery, and to subject kids to it should be downright criminal. http://i.imgur.REMOVEcom/fT8Qd.jpg

Chee Chalker!!
Chee Chalker!!

Aside from the obvious propaganda in that statement - doesn't "Garrett" realize that Alex's mom, the "batstuffings crazy" woman was OT XII? What does that say about the blech (tech) if people who reach the highest levels are crazy?

Kate Bornstein
Kate Bornstein

John P told me you did this Are_sics. That is SO FUNNY and really sweet. Thank you, love you right back. xoxo your ever-lovin' leather auntie

dee
dee

you don't even have to use their jargon to be called out you just have to phrase things a certain way and they all jump on you thinking that your out to get them and all your doing is just getting interested in the story's and comments and actually did not no about what was happening to them it almost made me say f em till i sat down and thought about the abuse that some are still going through......smiling a big smile sven's way

California
California

The problem, of course, is not just with DM but with his loyal minions.  Jones had loyal people who had vowed to kill those on Jones's enemies list if anything happened to Jones (killed, arrested by CIA or others, kidnapped) and they attempted to do so after the murders in Jonestown.  The same was true for Synanon. I do not think that there is a place on Planet Earth where DM would be able to live quite comfortably..... maybe he is considering being shot into space to live on a satellite? 

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