Former President of Narconon Oklahoma Now Calls It "Watered-Down Version of Introductory Scientology"

LucasCatton.jpg
Lucas Catton
A week ago, we reported that a former "employee" at Scientology's flagship drug treatment center in Oklahoma -- Narconon Arrowhead -- told us that the controversial center was delivering Scientology training rather than drug education, and that its officials have been concerned for years that its state certification was "extremely vulnerable." (The center is currently under investigation by local and state agencies for four deaths that have occurred there, three since last October.)

We didn't name that source, but now, he's come forward on his own.

We can now say that it is a former president of Narconon Arrowhead, Lucas Catton, who spoke to us about the troubled facility's past, and about his involvement not only in promoting the place, but also helping to operate its deceptive Internet referral network.

We had promised to keep Catton's identity secret, but then yesterday, he decided to out himself publicly with a lengthy blog post explaining to his former friends in Scientology why he was driven out of the church. We spoke to him briefly this morning, and now we can report what else he told us.

It was Catton who explained to us that Scientology officials have spent considerable resources lobbying and schmoozing state officials, worried that they would take a hard look at Narconon Arrowhead's certification.

"When I left in 2006, they were eagerly trying to get some type of amicable relationship with the Department of Mental Health," he says.

Narconon's first facility in Oklahoma, at Chilocco, had fought with the state for years to get its certification and then, in 1992, had got around the state's objections by submitting approval from a private group, the Commission for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). Scientology closed that facility in 2001 and moved to its present location at the Arrowhead Lodge on the shores of Lake Eufaula in the eastern part of the state.

Catton became president of the facility in 2002. And he says he became aware that Gary Smith, the center's executive director, and other officials were very worried: in the time since Narconon had received the 1992 exemption, the law had changed, and if the state took a hard look at its certification, the place might not stay open, Catton says. He explains that when the state accepted the CARF approval, the state did so only to certify the initial part of Narconon's four-part program of treatment.

"They were worried that they had to get their entire program certified by the state, or get the law changed, or they would not be allowed to operate at all," he told me.

As for the program itself, it was Catton who confirmed to me that its "students" learn almost nothing about drug addiction or drug education. Instead, they are trained almost exactly the same way beginning Scientologists are.

"It is true that there's very little drug information. You do the training routines, the sauna program, learning improvement, the objectives. You learn about Scientology's ethics. About overts and withholds. You do 'conditions,' and then The Way to Happiness, and then you're done. You feel bright and polished, but there's no real addressing of what the real problem is for each person," he said, naming the various steps of early Scientology training, such as hourslong staring exercises and talking to inanimate objects such as ashtrays.

And on the blog post he published yesterday, Catton writes that Narconon, "needs to be fully transparent and call it what it really is, rather than pretending to be something it is not. It needs to be compliant with treatment center regulations or not call itself a treatment center, but cop to really being a watered-down version of introductory Scientology methods applied to substance abusers."

Catton left his role as president of Narconon Arrowhead in 2006, and declined when he was urged to return to the job by Rena Weinberg, president of the Association for Better Living and Education (ABLE), Scientology's division that runs Narconon.

Catton then spent the next five years operating dozens of highly profitable websites that refer people to Narconon centers.

The websites are designed to be as generic as possible, saying nothing about Scientology, and they are created to capture people searching online for information about rehab centers. Convincing people who call in for more information to send someone to a Narconon center then earns that referrer a commission, typically ten percent of the $30,000 Narconon centers charge.

"I had a couple of dozen websites, some people have many more than that," he says. "They're basically unbranded websites for attracting people looking for some kind of drug treatment help. We had people manning the phone lines. And the whole pitch was to get them over to Narconon."

He adds that he would help people find non-Scientology treatment programs as well. "Did I make most of my money for Narconon? Yes, of course I did."

And from his blog post: "I believe the most important part is for people to be fully informed about the decisions they make and that they find what is going to work for them, based on actual truths rather than misleading statements or false representations."

In his lengthy blog post, Catton explains how things began to sour for him. Like so many other church members, he was getting worn down by the constant fundraising that Scientology leader David Miscavige had committed the organization to.

Seeing the protests by Anonymous in 2008 was also a shock, he writes, and as we've seen numerous times before, a copy of Scientology's propaganda magazine, Freedom that trashed former church executives only made Catton more curious about what those former members were alleging -- that Miscavige had physically attacked his top employees and housed them in a bizarre office-prison at the International Base east of Los Angeles.

As more questions about Scientology came up in his mind, Catton writes that he wanted to talk to Rena Weinberg, who had previously showed so much confidence in him. But by then, 2010, she seemed to have vanished, and Catton only got excuses when he tried to get her on the phone.

"The problem was, nobody could tell me where she was. I asked people at Narconon, people at ABLE, even called her husband and the Vice President of the Church, yet either they didn't know or they wouldn't tell me. So I kept digging and reading more and more," he writes. Eventually, "I learned about 'The Hole' and that she had been held captive in there."

(We reported on Tuesday that three eyewitnesses place Rena Weinberg in Scientology's concentration camp -- "The Hole" -- from at least 2007 to just a few months ago.)

In his blog post, Catton describes the hellish mental warfare he went through as church officials threatened him with being "declared a suppressive person" -- Scientology jargon for excommunication -- and the threat of "disconnection." For Catton, that was very much a worry: his wife was pulling away from him, but he didn't want to lose contact with his young daughter. Although he and his wife share legal custody, Catton knew that the church could make it very difficult for him to see her.

And that's part of the reason he asked that I not name him last week, even though he has been "declared" by the church. As much as he wanted to tell what he knows, he didn't want to lose his relationship with his daughter.

Now, just a week later, he's decided to go public.

This morning, he told me that he wanted it to be clear from his writings that he does not see himself as an anti-Scientologist, but someone who sincerely wants to reach out to his former friends in the church. I'll give him the last word:

To all my former friends -- I wish you well and hope that things reform soon, for your sake, and for the well-being of others. Did you honestly believe that one day I was one of the most respected members of the Narconon network internally, and the next I'm some evil Suppressive Person? I wish you no harm and never have. If, one day, you decide you can be my friend again, I will be here.



See also:
"Tom Cruise worships David Miscavige like a god"
Scientology's president and the death of his son: our complete coverage
What Katie is saving Suri from: Scientology interrogation of kids
Scientology's new defections: Hubbard's granddaughter and Miscavige's dad
Scientology's disgrace: our open letter to Tom Cruise
Scientology crumbling: An entire mission defects as a group
Scientology leader David Miscavige's vanished wife: Where's Shelly?
Neil Gaiman, 7, Interviewed About Scientology by the BBC in 1968
The Master Screenplay: Scientology History from Several Different Eras
And a post that pulls together the best of our Scientology reporting

Please check out our Facebook author page for updates and schedules.


**********
Tony Ortega has been the editor in chief of the Village Voice since March, 2007. He started writing about Scientology in 1995. You can reach him by e-mail at tortega@villagevoice.com, and if you ask nicely he'll put you on his mailing list for notifications of new stories. You can also catch his alerts at Twitter (@VoiceTonyO), at his Facebook author page, on Pinterest, a Tumblr, and even this new Google Plus doohickey.

New readers might want to check out our primer, "What is Scientology?" Another good overview is our series from last summer, "Top 25 People Crippling Scientology." At the top of every story, you'll see the "Scientology" category which, if you click on it, will bring up all of our most recent stories.

As for hot subjects we've covered here, you may have heard about Debbie Cook, the former church official who rebelled and was sued by Scientology. You might have also heard about the Super Power Building, Scientology's "Mecca," whose secrets were revealed here. We also reported how Scientology spied on its own most precious object, Tom Cruise. (We wrote Tom an open letter that he has yet to respond to.) Have you seen a Scientology ad on TV lately? We debunked some of the claims in that 2-minute commercial you might have seen while watching Glee or American Idol.

Other stories have looked at Scientology's policy of "disconnection" that is tearing families apart. You may also have heard something about the Sea Org experiences of the Paris sisters, Valeska and Melissa, and their friend Ramana Dienes-Browning. We've also featured Paulette Cooper, who wrote about Scientology back in the day, and Janet Reitman, Hugh Urban, and the team at the Tampa Bay Times, who write about it today. And there's plenty more coming.


My Voice Nation Help
405 comments
luckygardengal
luckygardengal

@oper_clambake my husband was in #Narconon Arrowhead in '09 instinct told me he HAD to leave ASAP he literally walked out ( for miles)

eddieVroom
eddieVroom like.author.displayName 1 Like

You need to hear this:

 

http://youtu.be/pK1-UJxjaH8

 

Apparently the practice of leaking confidential PC Folder info in order to Dead Agent people made it to NarCONon as well. Also, bogus medical certifications, patients abandoned and sexually abused -- which by definition may be Statutory Rape as these people are technically psychiatric patients. And that's the tip of the iceberg.

kenneth2
kenneth2

Regarding Lucas's estranged wife: Cults are like drugs: One gets hooked and loses his/her judgment & self determinism. The cult member hopes and anticipates that perhaps the next auditing cycle will bring back those early highs that may have gotten him into the cult originally. But unlike the drug addict who at least knows that is impossible, the cult member, ever the junky, gets deeper and deeper, willing to pay higher sums for even more ludicrous "technologies".

defrockedbitterapost
defrockedbitterapost

"Catton then spent the next five years operating dozens of highly profitable websites that refer people to Narconon centers."

 

After reading the article, Catton should be in prison for his crimes against the citizens of our country. He knowingly committing fraud, the shitbag should be in prison.

ClamOnAHalfshell
ClamOnAHalfshell

 @defrockedbitterapost I don't think it's good policy to shoot the whistleblowers. There's a good reason that the people who sing like a bird get lesser jail time. Of course, nobody's getting jail time in this situation. And that is indeed a problem. 

JustCallMeMary
JustCallMeMary

 @defrockedbitterapost How do you know he 'knowingly committed fraud"?  That's quite a general statement. What specifics do you have from which website? I certainly would like to know. I don't know of any specific acts of fraud on his part. Do tell.

defrockedbitterapost
defrockedbitterapost

A "watered down version" of organized crime. Well, that should make all ofthe Scientology crime syndicate's victims -- those still unmaimed and those still alive, any way -- very happy.

 

Sherbet
Sherbet like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

Wait.  I just got here, but do I see a troll saying he/she knows more about Narconon than the Former President of Narc. Oklahoma?  Oh, that's right.  Lucas's account is filled with lies.  He knows nothing, and is lying about the rest.  Same old, same old.  No new routine from scn when somebody blows.

1subgenius
1subgenius

@Sherbet The saying "Don't feed the troll." should come to mind.

CanuckXenu
CanuckXenu like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @Sherbet

 Make some popcorn. Water the plants. Find a nice comfortable chair. Join us in the fun--you'll be here for a while.

 

We've hooked a live one this time.  Makes Marcotai look like an amateur.

deElizabethan
deElizabethan

 @chuckbeatty77  

I can't find the original post. But you talk about the A & E, mentioning it 6 times. Was this just for SO people or what. I never did it, read it or reviewed it and don't know what the heck people are talking about when they mentioned it.  Sooo, I just yawn away and imagine some steps for something. Can they be simply stated?

CanuckXenu
CanuckXenu like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

 @deElizabethan

 I think when a Sea Organism officially routes out, he has to undergo steps called

A-E before being "allowed out."  This makes the process much longer and more complicated than it need be.  Maybe an experienced ex can be more specific.

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 5 Like

Remember when CCHR/Jan Eastgate took credit for shutting down Chelmsford in Australia? CCHR took action supposedley because 26 people died there over 2 decades. That equals an average of 1.3 deaths per year at Chelmsford.

 

NarCONon has had 3 deaths in less than a year. That's a 3X increase in the number of deaths that happened at Chelmsford.

 

Conclusion: If CCHR is really concerned with deaths that happen in these types of facilities, then CCHR should be working just as hard to SHUT NARCONON DOWN.

 

Instead the NarCONon spokesperson sends out an email essentially saying that three deaths in a year is really no big deal compared with other facilities. Oh yeah?

 

(cross-posted from xenu.net message board)

mimsey_borogrove
mimsey_borogrove like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 7 Like

Well, Lucas has assurred his declare. Too bad really. Had Hubbard decided to do a valid drug treatment program, he could have done so easily. He had the funds to pay for proper medical research, he had an orginization dedicated to catering to his wishes, he had a cadre of idealistic people who would want and support such a program. Yet he chose to put together a hodge podge of medical quackery, placebo effect / faith healing based drug rehab proceedure ( the Purification Rundown) and then market it in both Scientology and Narconon.  So, it is sad when good hearted people are collateral damage, but I applaud Lucas for taking a stand.  It is a tragedy when this organization betrays the good intentions of its folowers with deception stemming from it's founder's lack of morals.

 

Mimsey

ClamOnAHalfshell
ClamOnAHalfshell

 @mimsey_borogrove Hubbard could hardly have done anything less. His whole religion was based on the latest he pulled out of the air/ out of his head/ out of his posterior. The Purif emerged from the same tainted Source...from whence, your guess is as good as mine, but I'm thinking asspull.

meidaatit
meidaatit like.author.displayName 1 Like

I think the journalist is creating a case against Narconnon..without presenting the other side...by interviewing the many whose lives have turned around because of their particiaption in Narconnon.

ClamOnAHalfshell
ClamOnAHalfshell

 @meidaatit Dear OSAbot, I have news for you. When people die at a quack drug treatment program that turns out to be a front group for your darling $cientology, people are going to be upset. Meat bodies actually matter to non-Scientologists.

ClamOnAHalfshell
ClamOnAHalfshell

 @meidaatit Hey, buddy. My browser has a built-in spellchecker. Maybe you might want to try one? Also, way to misspell Narconon. It's spelled NarCONon. See? Easy. Well, easy for me. Did you go to one of those Delphi academies? Maybe you couldn't clay-model spelling. Gosh-darnit!

torymagoo44
torymagoo44 like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

 @meidaatit Unfortunately, meidaatit, both Narconon and $cientology survive BECAUSE of their endless, mostly phony "Success stories"  of people who wrother them while still "in". Talk with them when they're OUT. Ask them WHY do they HAVE to put we who did their programs and are out and speaking out...why do they HAVE to put us down? Can't you see...just a littttttttttle bit, how phony that really is? "ONLY look at *our* side, do NOT look at any other?" EVERY critic I know, every ex-Scio, Every Anonymous person can say "Look at BOTH sides, and make up your own minds". ONLY Scientology, and now Narconon have to say "ONLY look at our side" and try to slime we who are out and speaking about our experiences.

Here is the PRESIDENT OF NARCONON and what he said, just as a reminder or incase (which is often the case re people posting on the Net--you never even read it):

""It is true that there's very little drug information. You do the training routines, the sauna program, learning improvement, the objectives. You learn about Scientology's ethics. About overts and withholds. You do 'conditions,' and then The Way to Happiness, and then you're done. You feel bright and polished, but there's no real addressing of what the real problem is for each person,"

 

Should I remind you (supporting Narconon) of that again?

"....But there's no real addressing of what the real problem is for each person".

 

HELLLLLLLLLLOOOOOOOOOOOO???? Knock Knock! Look, read, Listen ..LEARN BOTH SIDES!~Love to all here and Tony O of course :)Tory/Magoo

ashura
ashura like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @torymagoo44  @meidaatit 

 

Well said magoo. Success stories, i.e. anecdotes, simply don't cut it. If Narcanon/Scientology were on the level and as successful as they try to market themselves to be, they'd open their doors to my colleagues and I to come evaluate them. They'd allow for true empirical analysis. But they can't, and they won't because it would, as I suspect, allow for the truth to get out.

torymagoo44
torymagoo44

 @meidaatit PS: Correction: "who wrother=wrote

torymagoo44
torymagoo44 like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

 @meidaatit PSS: Out of this one sentence (and I remember the mind control VERY well) a member of $cientology will only see one thing out of this sentence: "You feel bright and polished, but there's no real addressing of what the real problem is for each person,"

They will see AND hear: "You feel bright and polished"...and THAT IS  ALL.

 

The "There's no real addressing of what the real problem is for each person" is handled with "They'll continue on the "Bridge" (in the "church" of $cientology) ....and THAT will Fix THAT.

 

NO IT WILL ******NOT****** and that is NOT

what you are selling. You ARE lying, saying a) You are a "Medical Detox" when you are NOT and b) That you are a drug rehabilitation program, when you have ZERO intention, really, of doing *that*.  Investigate this, pull any certifications they have and close this BS program down. It is time. One death is too many. 4? Come on!!!

Tory/Magoo---30 years 'in" $cientology, escaped out (literally) in 2000, have been speaking out, freely, for 12 years now. Oh yes, C of $ has done some very awful things to me...as they have to others. And WE stand here, proudly, :)

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @meidaatit When Scientologists like yourself start interviewing the many whose lives have turned around because they were helped by a psychologist, instead of bashing psychology, then you can talk. Until then, you are such a hypocrite. Scientology's CCHR tried to have Chelmsford closed because of a rate of 1.3 deaths per year. Yet NarCONon's spokespeople like yourself claim that 3 deaths in less than a year is no big deal. You're not a thinking person, you're just a spokes-hole who writes what you are told to write. Please do some actual research and start thinking for yourself. 

Jgg2012
Jgg2012

  I think Scientology confuses Big Pharma with psychs (and other medical pros).  Yes, Big Pharma would not like to see an alternative to drugs, such as hypnosis or natural supplements, because it is competition.   A doctor, however, would love to have as many treatment options as possible.  In the US, doctors cannot get commissions off of drugs they prescribe (they can in some other countries) so there is no reason why they would prescribe drugs if an alternative was better. 

CanuckXenu
CanuckXenu like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @Jgg2012

 It's all the drugs that are prescribed for psychiatric and psychological illnesses: that's why Big Pharma is part of the target.  Watch the CCHR propaganda on Ritalin and other ADHD drugs.  The CCHR claims Big Pharma killed Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson, through psych. drugs, anti-depressants, anti-anxiety drugs, etc.  All the enemy of the cult. 

 

The psychs write the prescriptions for psych. drugs.  

ashura
ashura like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @meidaatit 

 

I think that yours is always an excuse in defense of the unprovable. Narcanon's numbers are fudged. The program is Scientology by another name. Nothing more. It's unproven (and obviously dangerous) as a drug rehabilitation program. It's a money scheme.

 

Th

meidaatit
meidaatit

 @ashura

Do you know a drug rehab that has proven techniques. Tell me> Different things work for different folks and their level of commitment. Obviously Stacy was not committed she left the rehab and went home and than returned. She was on drugs when she returned to the drug rehab.  

ashura
ashura like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @meidaatit 

You make a good point. Different treatments can work for different people. This has been one of the ongoing debates in the drug rehab literature, amongst practitioners and researchers who evaluate such things (of which I am in the latter group).

But I also know that Narcanon makes wild claims that it either cannot or refuses to back up with actual empirical evidence. But that is just one of the problems, the other is it is based upon Hubbard's discredited writings. So until such time that Narcanon actually opens itself up to outside, objective, empirical evaluation, one shouldn't be trying to claim this incredible success or that everyone else is so biased when scientology will not even provide verifiable data or outside evaluation.

 

I've been working with drug addicts, criminals,  politicians, and community leaders on this very issue for decades. I have a deep considered understanding of the literature, of which I have contributed multiple peer reviewed studies to top journals, to say with some confidence that the best drug rehabilitation efforts fail most of the time. It's the nature of drug addiction itself and the limits of human's ability to help others. I mean no offense to you, but if Narcanon were  aboveboard and truly confident in their numbers, they would welcome researchers and other interested outsiders to evaluate them in a in a hot minute. But since they won't even allow for the slightest bit of scrutiny, it speaks volumes as to what they might be hiding.

 

Anecdotal evidence of the type you suggest won't cut it as acceptable evidence.

 

 

exileandcunning
exileandcunning like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @meidaatit If narconon had had any medical staff, even a nurse, they could have saved Stacy's life.  Overdoses are easy to save.  And yes I have PERSONAL experience with this.  

 

Many rehabs have been studied by actual scientists and at least proven that their success rate is legitimate.  They don't quote success rates of 75%, but their actual success rate can be proven by an outside source.  

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @meidaatit  @ashura  Stop justifying why it was OKAY that NarCONon let Stacy die while she was in THEIR care. Stop making it "all Stacy's fault", especially when you do not have all the facts. Stop blaming the victim. It makes you look bad. 

JohnPCapitalist
JohnPCapitalist like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 4 Like

 @meidaatit Perhaps you could provide contact information for a representative sample of those whose lives have been turned around by Narconon, so that Tony Ortega could indeed interview them. In the list you provide, it would be particularly helpful if you would break out those who are now active members of the cult of Scientology versus those who have remained clean and sober solely as a result of Narconon and of no other drug treatment.  But, of course, the biggest number of people who have been through Narconon are those who had a relapse and knew that going back to Narconon would not help a bit. 

 

Nice to see that the OSA sock puppets are out in force, with generalities and banal arguments.  And typos, like misspelling "Narconnon."  

meidaatit
meidaatit

 @JohnPCapitalist

That is a privacy issue.

How do you know so much?

relapse is common in drug treatment otherwise the word would not exist. Sucess is not measured by whether the addict had a relapse but by the changes they have made in their life and the lengths of sobriety.  People who have attended any rehab have relapsed at times. That is why there are support groups for the addcit. It is usually a life long battle.

ClamOnAHalfshell
ClamOnAHalfshell

 @meidaatit  Your spelling is making my eyes bleed. Have mercy. Also, your argument is specious. NarCONon does not help addicts, it just indoctrinates them into $cientology. It's bogus drug treatment. It isn't drug treatment at all.

CanuckXenu
CanuckXenu like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

 @exileandcunning  @meidaatit

 Don't forget that 75% success-rate figure comes from the same people who claim they have "eight mililon members worldwide and are growing."

 

For such a statistic-obsessed organization they sure know how to ignore reality!

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @meidaatit  @JohnPCapitalist NarCONon does not fight drug addiction. NarCONon's entire program is all about delivering Scientology Purif and Scientology training to drug addicts. There is no addiction counseling in the NarCONon program, there is only Scientology. NarCONon's ONLY aim is to make Scientologists, and make more money for Scientology and Scientologists. Scientologists (erroneously) believe that if you give Scientology to a drug addict that he will magically quit drugs. LOL. That is why they have no stats. 

 

meidaatit- If YOU were to ACTUALLY start fighting drug addiction, you would not be supporting NarCONon but rather a treatment that has some proven stats in the area.   

CanuckXenu
CanuckXenu like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

 @JohnPCapitalist  @MrsVonTrapp

 You know what they say: "86 percent of statistics are made up on the spot..."

 

This reminds me of all the quack miracle cancer cure clinics out there that promise "80% cure rate!"  One quack doctor is even more specific: he claims a "92.3% success rate."

 

I don't know any legitimate rehab that makes percent promises, and trumpets them in all their literature. 

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName 1 Like

 @meidaatit  @JohnPCapitalist It's really too bad you have absolutely no interest in actual facts/information. I guess if it were up to you, there'd be no free press and CoS would be in charge of writing all the news. Please read the U.S. Constitution. It's not about "bashing", it's about freedom of information, something you have no experience with as long as you are a Scientologist. 

JohnPCapitalist
JohnPCapitalist like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 5 Like

 @MrsVonTrapp  I would suggest that survey results from Procter & Gamble saying that 75% of housewives like Tide are far more credible than anything coming out of Narconon.  Early advertising reforms in the 1950s targeted consumer goods makers, almost certainly including P&G, for fabricating claims out of thin air.  If they said "new and improved," they had to be able to demonstrate that there were actual improvements in the product to justify the label, even if it was a stretch to show that the improvements were significant.  These days, folks like P&G are fairly conservative in what they say about their products compared to folks like Narconon, who blatantly make stuff up.  The only reason they get away with it is that they're small enough that they fly mostly under the radar unless there's a giant hullabaloo, like there is now. 

MrsVonTrapp
MrsVonTrapp like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 2 Like

 @meidaatit  @JohnPCapitalist NarCONon has no stats because they provide no actual data about their success rate that can be peer reviewed or otherwise substantiated by an unbiased, outside source. What they do is the same as TIDE manufacturer Proctor and Gamble saying in a commercial "75% of housewives like our product". It has no basis in fact, it's just something they made up for a commercial. When a drug rehab therapy is scrutinized by science, recipients take part in a study and their privacy is not violated, but those results are published for all to read. NarCONon has no published results, anywhere, otherwise miss tit here would link to it. But she can't, she can only repeat the exact same lines that all Scientologist-spokes-holes are currently repeating. 

 

Good luck handling the media shit-storm, OSA. You're utterly failing at it. 

exileandcunning
exileandcunning like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName like.author.displayName 4 Like

 @meidaatit Show one statistic that actually proves narconon works.  Not from Narconon's website, from an actual scientific journal.

 

And for your information, I am a recovering addict still struggling with addiction, so I am 100% interested in fighting drug addiction.  I have experience with rehab and I know that Narconon's program would NOT work for a real addict.  Sweating and vitamins are not why people do drugs... And nothing that Narconon says has ever been proved by real research (if it has, post a link to the research, we'd love to see it).  I've read so many articles by scientists that show the methods don't work.

 

The success rate itself is a complete lie.  Read this page: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Narconon/studies.htm

 

"When the actual figures gathered by Gerdman are considered, it is hardly surprising that Narconon has been so reluctant to publish the study. They show that:

61 individuals entered the programme, of whom

24 left during detoxification;

23 left during other stages;

14 completed the programme.

The overall completion rate was thus 23%."

 

23% is a big difference from 75%.  And that study is a study done BY NARCONON and quoted as 75% because they didn't take into account all the people who left, who definitely can't be called succeses.  And there are a lot more studies on that page, too.

 

This page is about how the methods used at Narconon -- sauna, vitamins, etc -- are actually dangerous to addicts: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Narconon/detox.htm

 

Why don't you do some actual research instead of just spouting propaganda?  

 

meidaatit
meidaatit

 @JohnPCapitalist

 You sound like you are more interested in bashing  Narconnon  than helping fight drug addcition. If all the energy on this site was spent trying to help addicts rather than judging an organization ,that helps addicts  and t is under investigation but not yet guilty maybe drug addicts would get help. You are not the judge and all the facts are not in. Stop bashing. Join the cause to help stop drug addiction.

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