Stay Green, New York: Marijuana Arrests To Drop 20% In 2013

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You probably know the rules by now: in New York City, if you're caught in public view with pot, or in possession of 25 grams or more, you're getting a violation. Because of this (well, at least, partially), New Yorkers made up 99.2 percent (149,951) of the entire state's marijuana-related arrests (total: 155,048) last year. And, in 2012, getting thrown in the can for the reefer was still No. 1 in New York with the highest amount of arrests.

But lately, the external pressures placed on internal agencies by the incredibly high rates has become an engine for policy shifts. This is why Governor Cuomo continues to try to outlaw the public view provision in the criminal code last year. And why Bloomberg has opted out of the 'stay overnight in jail, be at court in the morning' situation for marijuana offenders. And why NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly has even told his officers to chill (brah) with the pot arrests.

Luckily, it looks like these efforts are actually showing real-time results.

According to data provided by the New York Post, marijuana arrests will fall 20 percent this year, continuing an overall downward slope that has characterized the sticky icky situation over the past few years. Since January, a little more than 10,000 New Yorkers have been accosted for pot charges - a number still outrageous but, compared to last year's numbers, a little less outrageous.

On a lighter note, a source told the Post that the NYPD are moving their attention over to what really matters: "let's just focus on pills and cocaine." You know, those drugs that actually do kill people, lead to terrible societal consequences, raise crime rates, yada, yada, yada. For the first time in seemingly forever, narcotics in New York are being weighed by that criteria.

Oh, to cap everything off: if Cuomo's attempt last year at nullifying the public view crackdowns had been passed, nearly 99% of the arrests in 2012 would not have happened. Talk about swift justice.

[jsurico15@gmail.com/@JohnSurico]


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3 comments
malcolmkyle16
malcolmkyle16

Prohibitionism is intensely, rabidly, frantically, frenetically, hysterically anti-freedom.

An important feature of prohibitionism (which it closely shares with fascism) is totalitarianism. That means:

A police state apparatus; widespread surveillance, arbitrary imprisonment or even murder of political opponents, mass-incarceration, torture, etc.

Like despicable, playground bullies, prohibitionists are vicious one moment, then full of self-pity the next. They whine and whinge like lying, spoilt brats, claiming they just want to "save the little children", but the moment they feel it safe to do so, they used brute force and savage brutality against those they claim to be defending.

Prohibitionists actually believe that they can transcend human nature and produce a better world. They allow only one doctrine, an impossible-to-obtain drug-free world. All forms of dissent, be they common-sense, scientific, constitutional, or democratic, are simply ignored, and their proponents vehemently persecuted.

During alcohol prohibition (1919-1933), all profits went to enrich thugs and criminals. While battling over turf, young men died every day on inner-city streets. A fortune was wasted on enforcement that could have been far more wisely allocated. On top of the budget-busting prosecution and incarceration costs, billions in taxes were lost. Finally, in 1929, the economy collapsed. Does that sound familiar?

FlyingTooLow
FlyingTooLow

All card-carrying members of the DEA need to read: Shoulda Robbed a Bank
Here is one of its reviews: 5.0 out of 5 stars... If David Sedaris had written 'Catcher in the Rye'..this would be it, June 30, 2012 Amazon Verified Purchase This review is from: Shoulda Robbed a Bank (Kindle Edition)

I have never smoked pot in my life...nor do I ever care to.
I read about this book in numerous Huffington Post comments. Thought I would read it because I know nothing about marijuana or the people involved with it. I am ecstatic that I did. Funny, Funny, Funny!!!
The chapters are like short stories. Stories about unloading boats with helicopters, close encounters with law enforcement, traveling through the jungles of South America. The chapter about the author's first time smoking marijuana made me feel like I was with him...coughing.
All of the characters were just a group of loveable, nice guys and girls. Not what I had been raised to believe...hysterical maniacs high on pot bent on death and mayhem. They were nothing like that.
If you have ever read any of David Sedaris' books, and like them...you will love Shoulda Robbed a Bank.
And the crazy things happening reminded me of Holden Caufield in 'Catcher in the Rye' and the way he staggered through life.
The way the words are put together are like nothing I have ever heard. I am sure I will use many of the sayings found in this book just to dazzle my friends. A terrific read. I love this book.

FlyingTooLow
FlyingTooLow

Law enforcement needs to re-direct its focus on crime...to those that are REAL crimes.

I was in Federal Prison for 5 years for a marijuana offense. No, it was not for simple possession. I was arrested aboard a Lockheed PV2 in Marianna, Florida...charged and convicted for conspiracy to import and distribute 12,000 pounds of marijuana.

As those 5 years rolled by, what I did see were armed bank robbers, coming and going...while I still sat there for marijuana. Most of the bank robbers only spent 17 to 24 months. But, I and my fellow 'drug offenders,'...we stayed for YEARS.

I wrote about the escapades that led to my incarceration.
I admit, I had a great time.
No one was injured, no one was killed, firearms were not involved...there were no victims.

We were Americans...doing what Americans do best...living free.

The book: Shoulda Robbed a Bank

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