Seven Movies Out This Weekend You Don't Know About But Should

Categories: Film and TV

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Each week new movies open in New York (and online) by the dozen. The Voice reviews all of 'em. Here are some you might not have heard about that got our critics excited, for better or worse:

Here's some rare good news: Two weeks in a row we've had first-rate horror flicks. Last week, Chuck Wilson touted writer/director Gerald Johnstone's Kiwi shut-in shears-and-teddy-bear freak-out Housebound, which is available on demand and totally worth your time if you're the kind of person intrigued by that description.

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Here's How Unbiased GamerGate Crusaders Would 'Review' Citizen Kane

Categories: Film and TV

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Someday soon, after the happy warriors of GamerGate have saved journalism, arts criticism will enter a golden new age of objectivity.

That's the vision laid out by Milo Yiannopoulos over at Breitbart.com, a website now dedicated to chumming the water for aggrieved gamer dudes as well as its usual Palinistas. Yiannopoulos dreams up a future where GamerGate -- which he defines as a "consumer revolt against shoddy ethics and bias in video-games journalism" -- has unlocked the rarest achievement of them all: "unbiased" coverage of games and game culture.

Of course, writing an "unbiased" review is as hard for a critic as it is for a GamerGater (or Breitbarter) to get through a day without feminists RUINING EVERYTHING.

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Film Podcast: Oscar Season Opens With Birdman and Listen Up Philip

Categories: Film and TV

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Photo: Alison Rosa
Michael Keaton and Edward Norton put up their dukes in Birdman.
It's awards season, and the hyped movies are starting to land in theaters. On this week's Voice Film Club podcast, we talk about Alejandro González Iñárritu's Birdman, starring Michael Keaton, and Alex Ross Perry's Listen Up Philip, and carve out some time to recommend Nothing Bad Can Happen and Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me. All four of those films have received high praise -- though some have been hit with some pretty damning criticism, including the characterization of Iñárritu as a "pretentious fraud," leveled by film critic Scott Tobias of The Dissolve. Amy Nicholson of LA Weekly, along with Alan Scherstuhl and Stephanie Zacharek of the Village Voice, dive into what stirs critics to use loaded words like those when reviewing a movie. Ahh, must be Oscar season.

Here are 6 Movies Opening This Weekend You Don't Know About But Should

Categories: Film and TV

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Each week new movies open in New York (and online) by the dozen. The Voice reviews all of 'em. Here's some you might not have heard about that got our critics excited, for better or worse:

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Film Podcast: Dear White People, Go See Dear White People

Categories: Film and TV

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Justin Simien's Dear White People.
With the news that Paul Feig is going to reboot Ghostbusters with an all-female cast, we wonder on this week's Voice Film Club podcast what it would be like if they re-did another '80s classic: Young Guns. We then move onto the latest Brad Pitt World War II movie, Fury, which is ultra violent. Amy Nicholson of LA Weekly says, "I like a war movie where they talk about how war is just really awful...this is a muddy in-the-trenches war movie." Joined, as always, by Alan Scherstuhl and Stephanie Zacharek of the Village Voice, the trio then pivot to Justin Simien's much-anticipated new film, Dear White People (be sure to read our interview with Simien), and then to post-apocalyptic western Young Ones, written and directed by Jake Paltrow.

Director of Panned '80s Graffiti Doc Stations of the Elevated Wonders Why We're So Into It Today

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Nobody thought a movie made entirely about graffiti-covered trains would be so compelling. But it was. Or so people think today. Stations of the Elevated, a 1980 documentary by cinematographer and School of Visual Arts professor Manfred Kirchheimer, has been getting the kind of recognition -- 24 years later -- that it never saw when the film was first released. During a sold-out screening at BAMcinemaFest, the theater still had a line around the block.

But why?

"I'm not altogether sure," Kirchheimer, now 83, tells the Voice. "There's a resurgence, but I don't know why. I'm just a filmmaker."

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The 10 Most Subversive Comics at New York Comic Con

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New York Comic Con kicked off on Thursday, attracting comics and pop-culture fanatics from around the globe to the Javits Center on the west side of Manhattan for celebrities and cosplay. Oh, and comics. Here's a selection of the 10 most subversive comics we spotted at NYCC.

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Six Movies Opening This Weekend You Don't Know About But Should

Categories: Film and TV

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Each week new movies open in New York (and online) by the dozen. The Voice reviews all of 'em. Here are some you might not have heard about that got our critics excited, for better or worse.

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The 20 Best Modern Vampire Movies, 1979 to the Present

Categories: Film and TV

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Our review of this week's Dracula Untold doesn't inspire much hope: "This Dracula Begins-style sword-and-fangs curio plays like someone said, 'What if we took a vampire flick but did a find-and-replace swapping out all that bare-neck sensuality for some video-game ass-kicking?' "

But for every genre-entry failure, there are numerous modern vampire movies that manage to plumb and toy with the creature's mythology in imaginative ways. The breadth of the directors featured here -- from French auteur Claire Denis to Germany's Werner Herzog to American mavericks Jim Jarmusch and Francis Ford Coppola -- speaks to the wide variety of voices that have tackled the genre with such ingenuity in recent decades. -- Danny King

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Film Podcast: Twin Peaks Returns, The Judge Disappoints, and Whiplash Drips With Jazz

Categories: Film and TV

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Photo by Daniel McFadden - © 2014 - Sony Pictures Classics
Miles Teller in Whiplash
Alan Scherstuhl and Stephanie Zacharek of the Village Voice, along with LA Weekly's Amy Nicholson, open this week's podcast with a brief discussion of Twin Peaks, which comes back to TV via a series on Showtime in 2016, and move on to The Judge, starring Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall, and then to Whiplash, starring Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons.

The gang also discuss the latest Left Behind movie, starring Nicolas Cage, before wrapping up with recommendations of the 1964 film Nothing But a Man and the documentaries Evolution of a Criminal and The Overnighters. It's all on this week's episode of the Voice Film Club podcast.

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