New Professional Baseball Code of Conduct Makes Posting of Porn in Public Places Against the Rules

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Photo Credit: permanently scatterbrained via Compfight cc
Oh, behaaaave. "Personal touching" is getting a second look in the new guidelines.
Major League Baseball is coming out, swinging. The professional baseball league produced a new Code of Conduct to better guard against homophobia on the field and in locker rooms. The announcement was made yesterday in conjunction with the New York State Attorney General's office and the MLB Players Association. Among the more sensible rules stipulated: No more posting of porn in public places, and be careful who you play grab-ass with.

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Hey! We're Gay! We're Married! Let's Move to ... Virginia? (UPDATED)

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"Hey, sweetheart, let's move to Virginia and make a life for ourselves there free of intolerance and inequality," said no gay couple ever. Or at least, that's what an effete writer working for a New York publication long-entwined with the city's gay community might assume.

You see, there's an odd geography problem here that our Federalist system produces: Before yesterday's overturning of DOMA, that act's restrictions, coupled with the inconsistent patchwork of anti-discrimination laws state-to-state, would make any gay couple with a brain cell between them stay away from states that, shall we say, didn't have their best interests at heart.

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DAMN. IT'S GAY MARRIAGE, Y'ALL.

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The raucousness of this morning's overturning of DOMA died away quickly.
This morning, at just a touch past 10, the Supreme Court announced its long-awaited ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act, striking the law down in an uncharacteristically sweeping 5-4 ruling. In all the media analysis mumbo-jumbo since the case was argued back in February, the fundamentals of the case got all tangled up in conjecture and hypotheses about the court ruling this way or that.

See Also: Scenes of Jubilation at the Stonewall Inn as the Supreme Court Strikes Down DOMA

Well, no more need for guesswork: With the demise of DOMA, married gay couples in the states where it's legal (Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa, Vermont, New Hampshire, New York, Washington, Maine, Maryland, Rhode Island, Delaware, Minnesota, and D.C.) can now enjoy the over 1,000 federal rights and benefits attached to marriage. And here in New York, it means more than 10,000 couples living with skim-milk marriage can now get their cut of the fat.

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First-Ever Russian LGBT Float in NYC Pride? Big Whoop.

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In a bid for the title of Shittiest Legislative Body on Earth, the lower house of Russia's parliament unanimously passed legislation banning "homosexual propaganda," evidently to stop Russia's LGBT community from preaching the wonders of gayness to kids. And next week, for the first time ever, the New York City Pride march will feature a float representing New York's Russian-speaking community.

So we called Yelena Goltsman, the founder of Rusa LGBT, expecting all kinds of hoorays and hoorahs, bright tones and fiery rhetoric. What we got: Whoop dee-freakin'-doo.

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Should Owners Of New York Wedding Venues Be Allowed To Discriminate Against Penis-Free Couples?

Categories: gay people.
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www.jimmyfungus.com

We told you yesterday about an Upstate couple that was informed by the owners of a farm-wedding venue that they couldn't hold their wedding in their barn. The reason: the couple does not include a penis -- they're lesbians.

The couple -- Melisa Erwin and Jenny McCarthy -- has filed a discrimination claim against Liberty Ridge Farm in Schaghticoke (just north of Albany) and its owner, Robert Gifford, for his decision to not host same-sex weddings at his farm.

New York decided to recognize same-sex marriages more than a year ago. But there are no prior legal cases that set any sort of precedent about whether a private business can refuse to accommodate a couple based on sexual orientation.

In other words, this case could set the standard for aspects of New York's discrimination laws.

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