Occupy Wall Street Arrests in Foley Square; Greek PM to Resign; NYC Marathon

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"At least 20" marchers were arrested yesterday as Occupy Wall Street protesters took to Foley Square. The New York Times City Room blog says the marchers "split into two groups, with about 200 on the sidewalk outside the court buildings and a larger group across the street on a large pedestrian island." Police and protesters argued about the legality of arresting people on a public sidewalk, as the NYPD had encouraged demonstrators to stay on the sidewalk and avoid roadways during previous marches. [NYT]

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Republican Secret Camera Scam Artist Fools NPR, But Also Muslim-Hating Bloggers

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James O'Keefe, the same Republican operative/twerp/'investigative journalist' behind such secret stings as the undercover ACORN videos (yeah, the pimp costume guy) and the attempted tapping of U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu's phones went at it again today with a new video project. This time, O'Keefe got NPR executive Ron Schiller to say disparaging things about the Tea Party and Republicans by pretending to be from a group of radical Muslims with money to donate. But O'Keefe's latest stunt, in turn, got Republicans to speak badly of Muslims. Everyone wins! (Loses?) More inside Press Clips, our daily media round-up.

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Why Did Gawker Refuse to Run John Cook's New York Observer Article on Scientology?

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On Tuesday afternoon, the New York Observer, now under the editorship of founding Gawker editor Elizabeth Spiers, published a juicy feature about Scientology by current Gawker editor and investigative journalist John Cook. Atop the article is a purposefully placed Observer editor's note in italics that reads, "Gawker.com, where the author is employed as a staff writer, declined to publish this story." Right away, the note sparked the discussion it was likely meant to: Why didn't Gawker want a big, exclusive and original story, especially in light of its admitted struggles with a new redesign and stated thirst for unique and scandalous features? "I'm not quite certain," Cook told Runnin' Scared. There's more inside Press Clips, our daily media column.

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Blogging is Dead, Long Live Blogging

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As a blogger working on a blog -- blogging, really -- it only feels appropriate to devote today's media column, Press Clips, to "The End of Blogging" in this week's New York Observer. In the provocative, narrow and winding feature, the Observer sets out to prove -- well, what, really? The "nut graph," as newspapers call "the point, summed up neatly," reads: "Whatever blogs have become, there seems to be universal agreement that the format that made them ubiquitous--the reverse-chronological aggregation accompanied by commentary--is not long for this world, and Mr. Denton's scoop-friendly redesign would seem to be the best evidence of that." Like we said yesterday, Gawker Media is rolling out a redesign. Are redesigns, grouped with Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook, murderous?

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Gawker Media Rolling Out Redesign, The Daily Coming Tomorrow and NewsBeast Merged

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New Jalopnik, Gawker's Car Blog
Gawker, The Daily and NewsBeast, oh my. Three of the year's biggest media launches so far have landed, albeit in different stages, on or around February 1, 2011, making for some vaguely exciting times on the internet, if you're into that sort of thing. Taken together, the shifts indicate a committed move toward the web (which, duh) but also toward tablet readers specifically, as pictures are set to be bigger, and some even in 3D, while a historic newsweekly, treading water for years, pins its hopes to a young website, which inflates its readership numbers as one of those dreaded aggregators. But aside from What It All Means, how do the new or revamped publications look and work in practice? With Gawker we now know in part, with The Daily we'll know soon enough and the new Newsweek is at least setting itself up to succeed. More inside Press Clips, our daily media round-up.

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Gawker Launching New Blog in Response to Massive Gnosis Hack

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Thomas Plunkett, Gawker Media's chief technology officer, announced yesterday in a staff memo that the company will be launching "a public Gawker Tech & Product blog," which he called "a long time coming." Slated for early next week, the new blog "will communicate product information as well as product plans to our readers." Plunkett's extensive memo, published by Romenesko, provides an informative overview of the week since a group by name of Gnosis compromised huge amounts of Gawker's private data, including its source code, internal communications and commenter passwords and email addresses. Plunkett calls the site's response "inadequate" and writes that he and his team were "unprepared to handle this eventuality." Full text of the memo after the jump.

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Nick Denton Apologizes to "Peasants"; FBI to Investigate Massive Gawker Hack

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via Gawker.com/Denton
Gawker Media seems to be back to normal for the moment (Lady Gaga IS still on the lookout for that unruly disco stick), minus the bar at the top of the homepage that says "Important: Gawker Commenting Accounts Compromised, Change Your Passwords. (more info)" and a post entitled "Gawker Security Breach: We're Here to Help." In addition, Nick Denton was "hanging out in crosstalk" today to answer commenter questions.

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Gawker Hacked by Gnosis, Site in Chaos (UPDATED)

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A group calling themselves Gnosis have posted a torrent, which they claim includes all of Gawker Media's source code, along with the previously threatened list of commenter names, email addresses and passwords on The Pirate Bay. The torrent of information currently has zero "seeders," making it impossible to download. For now. (UPDATE: The information is out. A summary of the entire hack is at the bottom of this post.) The group has also posted to Gawker.com under the name of the site's weekend writer Adrien Chen (who says he has no access to Gawker's blogging system), linking to the hacked information. The full hacked Gawker post and a statement of purpose from Gnosis below! Expect the site to go down altogether at some point as Gawker's tech people struggle to win back power.


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Gawker Media Admits Massive Hack of Private User Information (UPDATED)

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Yesterday, we cataloged a series of strange tweets from Gawker Media' tech site Gizmodo, claiming to be from the amorphous, loosely 4chan-affiliated hacker group Anonymous. In the messages, the hacker claimed to have stolen 1.5 million email addresses and passwords from three Gawker Media sites including the flagship, Gizmodo and Lifehacker. The mystery tweeter also demanded support for WikiLeaks. Minutes later, the messages were deleted, the account password changed and the "hack" laughed off by Gizmodo. Scott Kidder, Gawker Media's director of editorial operations, insisted that there was "no evidence to suggest any Gawker user accounts were compromised, and passwords encrypted / not stored in plain text anyway." Today, the alleged hacker is back and threatening to spill the stolen information. Now, Gawker is confirming the hack, though the original evidence provided still seems questionable.

[UPDATE: 12/12/2010, 5:07 p.m.: It's all happening.]

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Anonymous Hacks Gawker Media Properties in Support of WikiLeaks?

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At 3:29 p.m. on Saturday, Gawker posted a one-line link to President Obama calling WikiLeaks "deplorable." Minutes later, someone purporting to be from the 4chan-affiliated hacker group Anonymous started tweeting from the Twitter account of Gawker Media's tech site Gizmodo, claiming to have stolen 1.5 million email addresses and passwords from Gawker.com, Gizmodo.com and Lifehacker.com. Three follow-up tweets came minutes after, one reading simply "#wikileaks" and another "SUPPORT WIKILEAKS." The third said, "I remember when Gawker.com told Anon that they were invincible and couldn't be hacked. Well, you were wrong :)" All have since been deleted. Screenshots and an update after the jump.

[UPDATE: 12/12/2010, 5:07 p.m.: It's all happening.]

[UPDATE, 12/12/2010, 4:30 p.m.: For more on the Gawker hack, click here.]

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